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View Full Version : M&P .40 not going to slide lock



gogetal3
06-28-09, 11:15
I've been training with my M&P .40 now since March when i purchased it. MRJ are the first 3 letters in the serial #. I'd say 7 out of 10 times upon the last round fired the gun does not go to slide lock. I have a habit of putting slight pressure on the release with my thumb because thats where my grip is. Both right and left handed shooting. But it's the slightest of pressure. I've done a few tests with this grip, shot 2 rounds and slide lock when I'm not putting accidental pressure on the release. However when I'm under the clock and running the stages in comps and training I don't have the time to stop and think about my grip, it's all muscle memory. Besides this adds at least a second to my time to rack the slide after reloading. Other firearms I've trained with don't have this issue. I've checked the mags to see if they aren't engaging the slide lock effeciently when both the slide was off and on. I didn't notice an issue. I also do not load them to capacity. they are 15 round mags usually loaded to 13+1. Any input would be greatly appreciated. Does anyone who has a M&P have similar issues? Any recomendations on changing the mag springs or the slide lock spring? Thank you

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ygbsm
06-28-09, 11:20
Does it lock back when the blaster is empty? Try locking the slide back on an empty mag with your finger completely off the slide lock.

Robb Jensen
06-28-09, 11:33
I usually end up holding it down during shooting too. I have to consciously keep my support hand off of the slide lock as well as my shooting hand thumb.

The test to make sure it's not the gun is to load 1 round per mag and shoot it one handed left and right being sure to keep your thumb off the slide stop lever, it should go to slide lock.

gogetal3
06-28-09, 11:33
It locks no problem like that. I've tried slowly and with force to simulate a rapid lock with the mag empty. Which is why I'm leaning toward my thumb slightly and I do me ever so slightly touching the slide lock. But opinions are welcome thanks

RogerinTPA
06-28-09, 11:35
Does it lock back when the blaster is empty? Try locking the slide back on an empty mag with your finger completely off the slide lock.

That would be my advice. I had the same issue with my first M&P. You may not notice it, but during recoil, that slight pressure may be enough to inadvertently engage the slide lock. My thumb was slightly engaging the release because of my grip. I moved the thumb slightly left, and the problem went away.

gogetal3
06-28-09, 11:35
I usually end up holding it down during shooting too. I have to consciously keep my support hand off of the slide lock as well as my shooting hand thumb.

The test to make sure it's not the gun is to load 1 round per mag and shoot it one handed left and right being sure to keep your thumb off the slide stop lever, it should go to slide lock.

Is there a stronger mag spring I could install to eliminate that chance?

Robb Jensen
06-28-09, 11:42
Is there a stronger mag spring I could install to eliminate that chance?


I use in all my mags (17 round and 22 round) the Speed Shooters Specialties extra power mag springs and I still end up most of the time keeping it from slide lock. I shoot USPSA so most of the time it doesn't matter because I don't have to go to slide lock (I do a reload before going to slide lock). For IDPA I have a different slide stop where I've removed the lever of the left side of the gun and I just sling shot the slide after a reload.

John_Wayne777
06-28-09, 11:53
Have you tried playing with different grip panels? A different sized grip insert might alter your grip enough so that you no longer put pressure on the slide release.

ToddG
06-28-09, 13:17
Have you tried playing with different grip panels? A different sized grip insert might alter your grip enough so that you no longer put pressure on the slide release.

This would be my advice, as well.

If the gun is functioning properly (mechanically) then you can either change the way you handle the gun, change the shape of the gun, or change guns.

gogetal3
06-28-09, 18:16
I have tried all the grip panels. However my hands are large and the biggest grip offers the best trigger reach and control while comfortablly retaining the firearm in my hand.

ClosetCaseNerd
06-29-09, 06:39
I had this issue as well, I called S&W and asked if they had any of the old style slide releases** (the original did not have the bump or swell on it that is now standard on the M&P, it was slab sided). They did, but instead of them sending it to me to install like I wanted, I had to send the gun in to have this part changed. Free of charge of course, but annoying as its a 10 minute job.

I relented, sent the gun in, and now have no issues.

Hope this helps.

**Edit - Whoops! Edited to fix, thanks guys.

decodeddiesel
06-30-09, 15:40
Glad your problem was fixed, but this thread is about slide locks, not magazine catches.

Robb Jensen
06-30-09, 15:52
Glad your problem was fixed, but this thread is about slide locks, not magazine catches.

I'm pretty sure he meant slide catch and not mag catch judging by his description.

decodeddiesel
06-30-09, 16:09
I'm pretty sure he meant slide catch and not mag catch judging by his description.

Oh...sorry about that then. I wasn't sure if he meant the mag catch or the slide catch.

ToddG
06-30-09, 16:13
Oh...sorry about that then. I wasn't sure if he meant the mag catch or the slide catch.

Glad your problem was fixed, but this thread is about slide locks not misunderstandings.

(sorry, couldn't resist :cool:)

decodeddiesel
06-30-09, 17:07
To add content to the thread I am having a similar issue with my P99, however I have never had it with my M&P.

I have been trying to force a grip change in order to avoid hitting the slide catch, but I find it is not a natural positioning for my thumbs and frequently my thumb reverts back to the position where it contacts the slide catch during recoil. I find it add time in my draw stroke as I draw, bring the pistol to my support hand, ENSURE MY THUMB IS NOT ****ED UP, then drive the pistol to the target.

ClosetCaseNerd
07-01-09, 01:59
What I was trying to say is maybe your thing-ah-mah-jig, on your mammer-jammer, is all caddywhompus. :D

Anyway, as described in my EDITED post lol, the slab sided slide release/lock/catch/terminology of the day fixed my issue, and now that I think of it I did this in conjunction with taking the next size up grip insert and having Dan Burwell shave it down to be less bulbous and more similar in profile to the medium, so that it only added length to the grip and not width. This was awesome and made the pistol handle a lot better for me.

decodeddiesel
07-01-09, 09:17
...the slab sided slide release/lock/catch/terminology of the day fixed my issue, and now that I think of it I did this in conjunction with taking the next size up grip insert and having Dan Burwell shave it down to be less bulbous and more similar in profile to the medium, so that it only added length to the grip and not width. This was awesome and made the pistol handle a lot better for me.

Awesome! Glad to see a few minor modifications made such a difference.

ToddG
07-01-09, 10:42
I have been trying to force a grip change in order to avoid hitting the slide catch, but I find it is not a natural positioning for my thumbs and frequently my thumb reverts back to the position where it contacts the slide catch during recoil. I find it add time in my draw stroke as I draw, bring the pistol to my support hand, ENSURE MY THUMB IS NOT ****ED UP, then drive the pistol to the target.

There is really no solution to this other than practice, I'm afraid, unless you want to go the route of physically modifying the gun.

A very good approach is to establish your proper grip, shoot, and then very slowly & mechanically bring the gun backwards through your draw stroke routine until the gun is in the holster. Then very slowly do a draw, shoot, and go backwards slowly again. Remember, you are essentially re-learning how to grip a pistol.

The key is to go slowly. Most people want to practice and incorporate changes at full speed, but it just doesn't work that way. If I put you in a right-hand drive car, you couldn't go around a track as fast as you can in a left-hand drive car. You'd need to get used to the car a bit first. Same same.

decodeddiesel
07-01-09, 11:26
There is really no solution to this other than practice, I'm afraid, unless you want to go the route of physically modifying the gun.

A very good approach is to establish your proper grip, shoot, and then very slowly & mechanically bring the gun backwards through your draw stroke routine until the gun is in the holster. Then very slowly do a draw, shoot, and go backwards slowly again. Remember, you are essentially re-learning how to grip a pistol.

The key is to go slowly. Most people want to practice and incorporate changes at full speed, but it just doesn't work that way. If I put you in a right-hand drive car, you couldn't go around a track as fast as you can in a left-hand drive car. You'd need to get used to the car a bit first. Same same.

Good post Todd, thanks for the advise.

I really like the idea of going backwards through the draw stroke. I will slow it way down until I work my way through the problem.

Have you seen any issues like this with the P30? I was looking at the slide catch on one at a fun shop here and it seems very similar in shape and placement to the P99. Was there a grip re-adjustment going from the M&P to the P30?

ToddG
07-01-09, 12:53
When I first looked at the P30, before even getting the test gun, that was a major concern for me. In fact, gotm4, Failure2Stop, and I played with one at Virginia Arms (dry fire) for a bit.

What has worked for me is using the largest of the left grip panels, which helps both give me more purchase on the gun (more friction = less muzzle flip) and keeps my hands & fingers away from the lever enough to prevent non-slidelock.

decodeddiesel
07-01-09, 13:29
Just to further add to the discussion, this is one of the reason why I really like the thumb safety on my M&P. If I properly ride the safety while firing it completely moves my thumb away from the slide catch, and serves the purpose of forcing a very high hold on the pistol.

gogetal3
07-03-09, 14:59
There is really no solution to this other than practice, I'm afraid, unless you want to go the route of physically modifying the gun.

A very good approach is to establish your proper grip, shoot, and then very slowly & mechanically bring the gun backwards through your draw stroke routine until the gun is in the holster. Then very slowly do a draw, shoot, and go backwards slowly again. Remember, you are essentially re-learning how to grip a pistol.

The key is to go slowly. Most people want to practice and incorporate changes at full speed, but it just doesn't work that way. If I put you in a right-hand drive car, you couldn't go around a track as fast as you can in a left-hand drive car. You'd need to get used to the car a bit first. Same same.

Agreed, I get plenty of trigger time, and dry fire time as well. I was just wondering if anyone had a solution other than that or even if anyone had similar issues, and it infact wasn't the pistol in question. Thanks for the input everyone

ToddG
07-03-09, 17:19
The more common issue with the M&P is a slide stop lever which is too difficult to depress.

Depending on when your gun was manufactured, though, there was a running change about a year ago (very rough timeline) to a stronger spring.