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Pappabear
07-11-09, 23:39
I have noticed when slamming my mags in the HK45 it auto releases the slide. Built this way by design? I expect it is but did not know? If it is, what other pistols are built this way. I can slip them in easy and drop the slide with my thumb if I desire, fyi. Thank you experts in advance.

d90king
07-11-09, 23:42
My P30 and others I have shot also do it. I don't however think it is part of the design though... Could be wrong but I doubt it.

CarbonCycles
07-11-09, 23:43
Mine does the same thing when I over-lube (i.e., not paying attention and being sloppy). Pretty much every HK I've known and even my Glock will do it if given enough force.

dobe
07-11-09, 23:43
Don't believe it was in the design, and you may not be able to count on it every time. My HK45 and my P30 both will do this. If I lean the handgun to the right while slamming the mag., I've noticed that it almost always releases the slide.

ToddG
07-12-09, 00:33
Check your manual. I don't have a HK45 manual but I'm willing to bet, like most HK manuals, it says something like this:


WARNING: Forcefully inserting a loaded magazine into many pistols may cause the
pistolís slide to close, chambering a cartridge and making the pistol ready to fire.
When inserting a magazine, always be sure the P Series is pointed in a safe direc-
tion with your fingers off the trigger and outside the trigger guard. Failure to do so
could cause you to unintentionally fire the pistol, resulting in serious injury or death.


Ordinarily, I recommend against doing this purposely for two reasons:
On occasion, the slide will go forward without stripping the top round from the magazine. Now you've essentially induced a stoppage.
More often, the slide fails to go forward because something (angle, force, etc.) isn't quite right. The shooter drives the gun forward thinking it's in battery and when it fails to fire, he falls into a diagnostic mode trying to get it working.

Having said that, it's worth noting that at least one major federal LE agency issuing P-series HK's actually teaches its personnel that this auto-forward technique is a viable reload method.

NinjaMedic
07-12-09, 04:58
Is this maybe a result of the very large and long (comparatively) slide release?

d90king
07-12-09, 08:56
Is this maybe a result of the very large and long (comparatively) slide release?


That was my thought also, especially since the right side seems looser than it should be. I have learned to just deal with it....

I do think that the slide stops on this pistol (P30) is its weakest link. I had to learn an entirely new grip to shoot it properly (not that its a bad thing to learn).

Greg Bell
07-12-09, 10:00
All poly handguns do this to my knowledge. Some people reload this way on purpose (although I don't think it is a great idea).

Pappabear
07-12-09, 11:16
My Springfield 1911 TRP does not do it, and my XD's do not do it. It seems like a good design feature as long as it functions well. It has functioned perfectly when doing it. No jams or issues. I am going to check the manual and see if it references it.

Greg, if it functions well, why do you not like the concept?

dobe
07-12-09, 11:30
I think the problem is that you cannot depend upon it working every time. Therefore, if you are expecting it to happen and it doesn't, you will be delayed in chambering a round.

I personally do not feel there is a problem with the slide not picking up a round. The slide is already as far back as it would be if you were to manually release the slide. Because the slide is locked to the rear, the same amount of force is being transfered It should always chambers as well as manually releasing, when it actually releases.

The problem still exist in that it may not release as expected when you need it most.

kmrtnsn
07-12-09, 11:39
The Beretta 92/96 were the worst I've ever seen for being able to induce this phenomena. I can do it with either of my P229's, as Todd says, "given enough force". This is not unique to polymer framed pistols.

woodandsteel
07-12-09, 11:44
All poly handguns do this to my knowledge. Some people reload this way on purpose (although I don't think it is a great idea).

We were taught that the Glocks would do this in the academy. And, most of the time, it does work. But, you and the others are correct that this is not a reliable way to reload. It tends to cause a tiny bit of confusion when you slam a mag into the gun and it fails to send the slide forward.

Savior 6
07-13-09, 01:54
Could this "slam" feature be simply because one's finger or thumb is already on the slide catch/release during the realod process? I am a lefty and have noticed that this has happened quite a few times with my HKs (trigger finger indexes on/near the slide catch), but has not with my Glocks or Sigs, as my finger or thumb are nowhere near the slide catch/release on those two models.

tpd223
07-13-09, 05:00
"Could this "slam" feature be simply because one's finger or thumb is already on the slide catch/release during the realod process?"

No. I see it all the time, it's the magazine being slammed into the mag well forcefully that causes it.

HK45
07-13-09, 13:08
Most pistols I have owned do this including some 1911's. I find it to be unsafe and annoying.

NCPatrolAR
07-13-09, 13:31
Most pistols I have owned do this including some 1911's. I find it to be unsafe and annoying.

why do you feel it is unsafe?

zchen
07-13-09, 18:36
doesn't the STI/SVI 2011s do this as part of design?

loupav
07-13-09, 21:11
I think P9's did this as well. (as part of the design?)

N.Franklin
07-16-09, 22:46
Ive done the same thing with numerous Berettas and Sigs, its not part of the design of the gun to do so. I dont try to do it on purpose but when it does happen (only when Im being timed on the reload) I try to run with it without racking the slide like Im used to and losing a round.

Savior 6
07-18-09, 06:48
I think P9's did this as well. (as part of the design?)

The P9s has a specific lever for this located on the left side below the trigger finger. Same lever as the cocking/decocking lever.

I don't see any pistol that has this as an actual "feature", merely just being a side-effect.

I also have to resubmit the idea that this happens due to the placement of firers thumb or trigger finger placement. Being that when a person is preparing to reload he/she automatically moves his/her thumb (right handers) or trigger finger (left handers) on an index point which rides the "release" making it more "sensitive" to releasing the slide.