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Blob
07-13-09, 14:27
I sprained my right wrist pretty bad last night and it got me thinking...with my strong hand in a splint for the better part of a week, there's no way I would be able to draw and operate my pistol from my normal IWB holster. Now we all know the importance of training with the weak hand (which I do) but who here has actually given thought to purchasing a weak side holster for use in the event that your strong hand should become temporarily unusable?

It is definitely something I'm going to be doing in the near future along with increasing my weak hand training by a good amount.

This also got me thinking about the benefit of carrying a safe action pistol, a Double Action with a decocker, or a revolver as there are no manual safeties to operate without shifting grip.

tylerw02
07-13-09, 14:45
This also got me thinking about the benefit of carrying a safe action pistol, a Double Action with a decocker, or a revolver as there are no manual safeties to operate without shifting grip.

This.

USMC03
07-13-09, 16:45
Carried a pistol on duty for 5 weeks, qualified with my duty pistol (not modified, had to do the same course as everyone else), and shot Larry Vickers 2 day pistol class with support hand only. The only part of Larry's pistol class that I did not do was type III malfunctions. I could have done them but I would have been a major safety violation to everyone else on the range.

My strong arm was in a sling after shoulder surgery.

And shooting wasn't the only thing I had to learn to do support hand only (brushing my teeth, dressing myself (think about trying to zip you your pants with only one hand), preparing and eating food, tying my shoes, wipping my ass, signing my name, etc.)

It's mindset. It was a major inconvience and took a lot of patients. You learn to adapt.

http://i278.photobucket.com/albums/kk99/USMC03_photos/Vickers%20Tactical%2008/e2e11bca.jpg

http://i278.photobucket.com/albums/kk99/USMC03_photos/Vickers%20Tactical%2008/730cb097.jpg


Edited to add: I borrowed a left handed holster from another Detective for the 5 weeks I was in the sling.

S/F,
Jeff

ToddG
07-13-09, 17:51
there's no way I would be able to draw and operate my pistol from my normal IWB holster.

While not what I'd recommend if you know your strong hand/arm will be out of commission, this is still something you need to consider. If you cannot draw from your normal carry rig unless your strong hand is free and mobile, what are you going to do if your invitation to a gunfight comes in the form of a bullet disabling your strong hand or harm?

Abraxas
07-13-09, 17:56
While not what I'd recommend if you know your strong hand/arm will be out of commission, this is still something you need to consider. If you cannot draw from your normal carry rig unless your strong hand is free and mobile, what are you going to do if your invitation to a gunfight comes in the form of a bullet disabling your strong hand or harm?

Are you still appendix carrying?

ToddG
07-13-09, 18:10
Are you still appendix carrying?

Indeed. It's been almost exactly one year since I switched.

Buckshot TX
07-13-09, 21:11
I keep weak hand rigs for my primary sidearms to cover longterm situations & I carry my BUG offside to deal w/ the immediate issue. Various A/C separations, breaks & cuts have taught me the hard way to be prepared for that situation.

Blob
07-13-09, 23:53
While not what I'd recommend if you know your strong hand/arm will be out of commission, this is still something you need to consider. If you cannot draw from your normal carry rig unless your strong hand is free and mobile, what are you going to do if your invitation to a gunfight comes in the form of a bullet disabling your strong hand or harm?

I can draw with my left hand from my right side if needed, but it's not ideal. You make an excellent point though and that is something I will incorporate into my training also.

Beat Trash
07-14-09, 09:12
Our department does a small bit of training on drawing the gun using the weak hand (should your strong hand become disabled). It can be done, but those with larger bellies, have more to contend with.

I once impaled my strong hand on a chain link fence (that the dope boys had bent the top part up). While I was restricted to administrative duties, I was still armed at work. Borrowed a left hand holster from a friend. I immediately went to the range to practice. Had to really concentrate on the basics.

I have to admit, shooting with the weak hand only is much easier than brushing your teeth with the weak hand only, or zipping up your pants... It's the little things in life we take for granite.

Skintop911
07-14-09, 10:47
Semantics Alert: I've always preferred to call it my "support" side rather than weak. It is indeed my support side, but it doesn't have to be weak.

Mindset thing, I guess.

FromMyColdDeadHand
07-14-09, 13:23
Dumb idea of the day? Get a sling that is big and thick enough to secure your holster in and conceal it? Kind of a reverse draw and not the most efficient motion, but I would think you could keep it from sweeping yourself as you drew. How would people feel about carrying with a handgun, in a holster, pointed towards the right?

HowardCohodas
07-14-09, 13:29
I am nearly ambidextrous. I just don't write well with my left hand. Actually, my writing is not that good with my right hand either. ;)

From the SmartCarry it is "relatively" easy to draw left handed from a right-handed configuration. However, part of my "plan b" is that I carry my BUG in my left hand front pocket. I dry-fire both my primary and BUG two-handed and one-handed, right and left. I live fire both handguns in all three modes. I want as much redundancy as I can build into the system so that I have the best possible chance of prevailing.

czydj
07-14-09, 15:47
While not what I'd recommend if you know your strong hand/arm will be out of commission, this is still something you need to consider. If you cannot draw from your normal carry rig unless your strong hand is free and mobile, what are you going to do if your invitation to a gunfight comes in the form of a bullet disabling your strong hand or harm?

This scenario shoots a big hole in my strong side, pocket carry...

FVC3
07-14-09, 16:20
[QUOTE=Blob;409722]I sprained my right wrist pretty bad last night and it got me thinking...with my strong hand in a splint for the better part of a week, there's no way I would be able to draw and operate my pistol from my normal IWB holster. Now we all know the importance of training with the weak hand (which I do) but who here has actually given thought to purchasing a weak side holster for use in the event that your strong hand should become temporarily unusable?
[QUOTE]

How can you practice support hand presentations without a support side holster? I've got one for every gun I carry regularly - except the few BUGs I pocket carry.

Blob
07-14-09, 22:23
[QUOTE=Blob;409722]I sprained my right wrist pretty bad last night and it got me thinking...with my strong hand in a splint for the better part of a week, there's no way I would be able to draw and operate my pistol from my normal IWB holster. Now we all know the importance of training with the weak hand (which I do) but who here has actually given thought to purchasing a weak side holster for use in the event that your strong hand should become temporarily unusable?
[QUOTE]

How can you practice support hand presentations without a support side holster? I've got one for every gun I carry regularly - except the few BUGs I pocket carry.

See the part in red ;)

FVC3
07-15-09, 07:43
[QUOTE=FVC3;410477][QUOTE=Blob;409722]I sprained my right wrist pretty bad last night and it got me thinking...with my strong hand in a splint for the better part of a week, there's no way I would be able to draw and operate my pistol from my normal IWB holster. Now we all know the importance of training with the weak hand (which I do) but who here has actually given thought to purchasing a weak side holster for use in the event that your strong hand should become temporarily unusable?


See the part in red ;)

Um, yeah... I saw that. I also saw where you said you trained support side - training that would require a support-side holster, ay wot?

Oddly, you asked who among us had actually given thought to buying a support side holster. I answered. I also make sure I can access and run my gun with only my support hand, in case I don't get to make that decision at my leisure.

Blob
07-15-09, 17:25
[QUOTE=Blob;410642][QUOTE=FVC3;410477]

Um, yeah... I saw that. I also saw where you said you trained support side - training that would require a support-side holster, ay wot?

Oddly, you asked who among us had actually given thought to buying a support side holster. I answered. I also make sure I can access and run my gun with only my support hand, in case I don't get to make that decision at my leisure.

Gotcha. I train with my support hand in case it gets injured in the fight, and I can draw my gun from my strong side with my support hand albeit not in the most efficient manner. My point was that if something happened to your strong hand BEFORE a fight, why not give yourself as many advantages as you can by transitioning your holster to your support side for the easiest access to your sidearm?

I've only been carrying for a little over a year so this is something that has not occurred to me until now, and I thought I'd give other relatively inexperienced CCWers an opportunity to consider something that they may not have thought of otherwise.