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dorchester
08-08-09, 18:32
OK, the LCR has been out for a while now, and still no recall! At least not that I've heard. I recently handled an LCR and I have to say I was very impressed by the quality of the trigger pull, much better than on any J-frame I've used or owned. So the question is: do the LCR's reliably ignite and function as a defensive revolver should? I know it's ugly, but what else is there I don't know? Fragile? Sticky or slow to reload? Short life span? Just too damn ugly? Thanks for the input.

woodandsteel
08-08-09, 22:15
I don't know of anyone that owns one. Around here, the only Ruger LCRs that you can find, are the display models at the gunstore. They will let you hold one and examine it. Bought, if you want one, you need to order it.

My impression, from handling one, is that it doesn't really do any different than what the J Frames do. Although the LCR is 2 ounces lighter than the S&W 442.

As a disclaimer, I should not that the J Frame S&W is near and dear to my heart. The first handgun I ever bought for CCW was a S&W 36 Chief's Special. With that said, I do own, carry and love the Ruger LCP.

I don't think there should be any problems with the LCR. Even if there were to be problems, Ruger was very responsive to me with the LCP recall.

kmrtnsn
08-09-09, 02:28
I, for one am anxious to shoot it.

Business_Casual
08-09-09, 10:20
Would someone explain to me why you would practice with a 15 or 17 shot pistol, carry extra magazines and train with it; then turn around and carry a 5 or 6 shot revolver with a short barrel that has a completely different trigger, is difficult to reload and carry the reloads, as well as having completely different sights and ergonomics?

Why not just shove a compact model of your main gun in your pocket?

M_P

woodandsteel
08-09-09, 11:43
Would someone explain to me why you would practice with a 15 or 17 shot pistol, carry extra magazines and train with it; then turn around and carry a 5 or 6 shot revolver with a short barrel that has a completely different trigger, is difficult to reload and carry the reloads, as well as having completely different sights and ergonomics?

Why not just shove a compact model of your main gun in your pocket?

M_P

That is a valid question. Unfortunately I can not argue against it. All I can say is that when I bought my S&W 36, Glock had yet to introduce the Glock 26/27. Plus, I find that a S&W 442 or the Ruger LCP is easier to pocket carry.

In the summer time, I find myself becoming lazy and just stuffing the LCP in my front pants pocket. However, recently we had a bank robbery that happened locally. In the surveillance footage, you can see the robber pointing a full sized semi auto pistol at a customer. That, and the talk of the 25 year annivesary of the McDonalds shooting in San Ysidro, has me looking at carrying my Glock 23 more often. The compact .380 just doesn't seem to fill me with too much confidence.

For on duty, I still want a back up gun that I can easily get out of my left pocket. The Glock 27 is just too big for that.

Powder_Burn
08-09-09, 12:03
My impression, from handling one, is that it doesn't really do any different than what the J Frames do. Although the LCR is 2 ounces lighter than the S&W 442

The lighter weight in the LCR could be a negative. Just read a report of someone shooting 158gr Fiocchi in an LCR and the bullets jumped crimp and locked up the gun. I also experienced this same thing with a S&W 360PD until I switched from Cor-Bon to Gold Dots in the short barrel variety. Less weight could be a liability if coupled with the wrong ammo.

Mark/MO
08-09-09, 14:29
I recently had the opportunity to fire a variety of 38s, both standard velocity and +P, through one. I started out not wanting to like it, having owned and shot J frames for years. Besides, I personally find it ugly. I quickly had my opinion changed and experienced no problems with it. I really liked the trigger, it was superior to my Smith. It shot everything we fed it and reloaded the same as any revolver. The owner, a long-time friend, has shot a butt-load of rounds through it in a short time. He reports no problems. In fact he thinks so much of it that he's ordered another for his wife.

Of course it has the same shortcomings as any revolver does. Recoil was about the same as a 642, at least to me. Accuracy was also comparable. My opinion after playing with one for a few hours is it should be as good as a J frame. Time will tell as to its long term durability. I have doubts about most of Ruger's centerfire autoloading pistols but think their revolvers are fairly indestructible.

skyugo
08-09-09, 15:03
I recently had the opportunity to fire a variety of 38s, both standard velocity and +P, through one. I started out not wanting to like it, having owned and shot J frames for years. Besides, I personally find it ugly. I quickly had my opinion changed and experienced no problems with it. I really liked the trigger, it was superior to my Smith. It shot everything we fed it and reloaded the same as any revolver. The owner, a long-time friend, has shot a butt-load of rounds through it in a short time. He reports no problems. In fact he thinks so much of it that he's ordered another for his wife.

Of course it has the same shortcomings as any revolver does. Recoil was about the same as a 642, at least to me. Accuracy was also comparable. My opinion after playing with one for a few hours is it should be as good as a J frame. Time will tell as to its long term durability. I have doubts about most of Ruger's centerfire autoloading pistols but think their revolvers are fairly indestructible.

huh.... well that's a pretty good testimonial. i DO like ruger revolvers. had my eye on a 44 mag alaskan for awhile now :D
they're like 350 bucks right?

Mark/MO
08-09-09, 16:24
huh.... well that's a pretty good testimonial. i DO like ruger revolvers. had my eye on a 44 mag alaskan for awhile now :D
they're like 350 bucks right?

I think you're about right on the price. I didn't ask what he paid for it and it is the only one I've seen.

I know what you mean. I too have a fondness for their revolvers, owning more than a couple of them. A Single Six was my first handgun, bought with money I'd earned cutting wood over 30 years ago. I still have it.

kmrtnsn
08-09-09, 18:08
"Would someone explain to me why you would practice with a 15 or 17 shot pistol, carry extra magazines and train with it; then turn around and carry a 5 or 6 shot revolver with a short barrel that has a completely different trigger, is difficult to reload and carry the reloads, as well as having completely different sights and ergonomics?

Why not just shove a compact model of your main gun in your pocket?"

Some companies just don't make an adequate sub-compact pistol version of their mid and full size; SIG for instance. Some situations require the smallest and lightest possible concealment piece, ever see an aluminium/titanium auto?. Completely different trigger? I shoot DAK, LEM, and DAO so it isn't that much different to me. At the range a BUG is typically fired I am not worried about sights, I'm point shooting anything under 7 yards anyway. Speed strips are really easy to carry and load. As for ergonomics; practice.

As it stands, the LCR represents an inexpensive alternative to the 340PD as a BUG and I for one am anxious to try it out.

mourneblade
08-09-09, 22:21
I've been pleased with mine. Nice for the summer when my clothes don't allow for a heavier gun. I've fired 158gr round nose without any problems, really I've had no problems with the LCR at all. Normally I carry a HK P30, but the simplicity of the revolver has grown on me. The low ammo count is always in the back of my mind though.

markm
08-09-09, 22:33
Would someone explain to me why you would practice with a 15 or 17 shot pistol, carry extra magazines and train with it; then turn around and carry a 5 or 6 shot revolver with a short barrel that has a completely different trigger, is difficult to reload and carry the reloads, as well as having completely different sights and ergonomics?

Why not just shove a compact model of your main gun in your pocket?

M_P

For the same reason that people build turbo AR carbines and grab a friggin bird gun for home defense.... RETARDATION.

Zhurdan
08-11-09, 17:07
Would someone explain to me why you would practice with a 15 or 17 shot pistol, carry extra magazines and train with it; then turn around and carry a 5 or 6 shot revolver with a short barrel that has a completely different trigger, is difficult to reload and carry the reloads, as well as having completely different sights and ergonomics?

Why not just shove a compact model of your main gun in your pocket?

M_P

I'm interested in any info, because I'll be shoving the LCR into my wifes pocket, and she might not always be around when I need it. :D

I've been looking at one for my wife. I bought her a Sub-Compact XD 9mm that she shot really well, but she couldn't really manipulate the slide reliably enough. Yeah, it carried twice the rounds as the LCR does, but she didn't like to practice with it because she couldn't run the slide. My little single action .22 on the other hand, she loves to shoot, because she can manipulate the pistol all on her own, shooting at her own pace. Same goes for the LCR. She's handled it, pondered the purchase, but she wanted more info from people who've shot one.

If someone doesn't practice with their weapon, they might as well leave it at home... which she did with the XD, so there's some value to the conversation.

DBR
08-11-09, 23:19
Zhurdan:

The best way I have seen to teach a person to operate a semiauto slide they have trouble with:

1) Hold the gun against the body at the bottom of the rib cage with a normal strong hand grip (finger outside the trigger guard, along the frame).
2) Grip the slide overhand with the weak hand (thumb pointing toward the back of the slide) with the whole hand.
3) Cock the slide by pushing forward with the strong hand while holding the weak hand against the body.

If you haven't had your wife try this maybe it will help.

Zhurdan
08-12-09, 01:56
Zhurdan:

The best way I have seen to teach a person to operate a semiauto slide they have trouble with:

1) Hold the gun against the body at the bottom of the rib cage with a normal strong hand grip (finger outside the trigger guard, along the frame).
2) Grip the slide overhand with the weak hand (thumb pointing toward the back of the slide) with the whole hand.
3) Cock the slide by pushing forward with the strong hand while holding the weak hand against the body.

If you haven't had your wife try this maybe it will help.


DBR,
Thanks for the notion, but I've tried everything you've said and more. The point is, she doesn't "want" to do those things. The one thing I've found is that she likes to shoot my revolvers. She "feels" more comfortable with them, therefore, I'm going to work with her strengths. Some might say to force her to work with a certain system, but in order to get someone comfortable with a system, they have to want to work with it. She's comfortable with revolvers, so that's the direction I'm going to work. She's not afraid of guns, just that she wouldn't be able to make it function when she needs to. That's the sole reason behind working towards a revolver. She's a damn good shot, she knows how to handle firearms, but if she won't dedicate the time to learning a system for whatever reason, she won't practice... therefore, I'm trying to find her a system she's comfortable with. Now, before anyone says it, she WANTS to carry. We had an unfortunate incident where the county attorney made some threats against his ex-wife and my wife during their divorce. Since then, we've worked on many different things from hand on hand classes to pepper sprays to stun guns. All of which took, but she wants to find something more. The BG has kind of gone by the way side, but she still recognizes the need for defensive arms. I bought her the XD because it's what "felt good" in her hands. She's kind of small, so sheer strength isn't going to do it. I'd rather have her carry a pistol with 5 rounds that she's comfortable with than carry a 10 round pistol she won't practice with. It's a mental thing for her. Like I mentioned earlier, she'll shoot the shit out of my revolvers from .22 to 45LC, because she knows how to handle them, but she abhores my autos. I appreciate the thought though. Thanks.

Zhur

xray 99
08-12-09, 10:47
For the same reason that people build turbo AR carbines and grab a friggin bird gun for home defense.... RETARDATION.

My bobbed hammer M37 is lighter and more compact than the Glock 26. When hiking, I appreciate that. Maybe I'm compromising firepower but that does not mean I'm....mentally challenged. My friends yell at me for using the word retarded.

Falboy
08-13-09, 11:18
You can't fire a small auto from your pocket more than once, if at all. I know it's not ideal, but sometimes the situation may call for it. I think Mark should maybe be a little more polite. "If you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything." I mainly use 1911s and SIGs, but the little Ruger has it's place. If you're not smart enough to tell the difference between a 1911 and a DAO snubby in your hand, maybe you shouldn't carry a gun anyhow. You don't try to hammer with a screwdriver just because that's what's in your hand, do you? I mean that as respectfully as possible.:D Practice is the difference....... LCRs are a backorder situation as of now, my Dad has one on order for me.

C4IGrant
08-13-09, 14:18
OK, the LCR has been out for a while now, and still no recall! At least not that I've heard. I recently handled an LCR and I have to say I was very impressed by the quality of the trigger pull, much better than on any J-frame I've used or owned. So the question is: do the LCR's reliably ignite and function as a defensive revolver should? I know it's ugly, but what else is there I don't know? Fragile? Sticky or slow to reload? Short life span? Just too damn ugly? Thanks for the input.

First thing, the 380Auto sucks ass. Second thing, you can get a trigger job on a revolver.

With that said, I would carry one of the fantastic autoloaders out there like the G26 or M&P Compact's. Very reliable and much better caliber offerings.



C4

Falboy
08-13-09, 15:54
Update: my LCR is in St. Louis, waiting to be shipped to my Dad, I'l wring her out next week and give my observations.

montanadave
08-13-09, 18:37
I put seventy five rounds through a new LCR yesterday and was pleased with the way it handled. Smooth trigger, very manageable recoil and reasonably accurate for a gun this size. Several other fellows at the range also tried it out and commented that it was as smooth (and accurate) as their S&W snubs while being substantially lighter.

It will likely end up in my wife's purse as she has rheumatoid arthritis and can have difficulty working the slide on a semi. For the niche market it is intended for, the LCR seems to be a pretty decent fit.

dorchester
08-15-09, 07:54
The pluses and very real minuses of a snubby are well known to most of us. I actually own 2 M&P compacts and they are fantastic. Carrying one in a pocket holster is not in my comfort zone however; for myself, I want a real holster and a clean draw for any gun with such a short/light trigger pull. There was a certain NFL player who probably wishes he hadn't stuck a Glock in his pocket (I'm just sayin... ). Some things only a snubby can do and for those there's the J frame Smiths and maybe the LCR. I don't want to encourage subject drift, just find out if this is a cheaper and perhaps even a better snubby then the market standard. Sadly, my two experiences with improving the trigger pull on a J frame were 1) underwhelming and expensive or 2) a much too weak trigger return action. I know the LCR is ugly and I honestly think that and a prudent desire not to jump on the latest fad is some of the resistance to it. So... does it work well for what it is?

Stan_TheGunNut
08-15-09, 22:04
A friend of mine bought an LCR and we took it to the range and tried it out. The trigger was very good as was accuracy. Recoil seemed a bit stouter (similar but not quite as bad as shooting 357 out of one of the S&W scandium revolvers) than my Smith & Wesson 38Spcl snubby, but the Ruger is lighter and more controllable than the 357 Smith snubbies. It feels to me like the area behind the trigger should be relieved a little more to allow for a different grip.

That's my impression after only about 15 rounds.

cens
08-29-09, 21:07
I have about 650 rounds through my LCR, mostly 158gr .38sp. practice rounds but also some +P hollow points that I got just to test recoil with +P ammo. No functional issues with the gun so far. I seems to be holding up well, although the breech face has some dings on it. The trigger is great and the gun is more accurate than a tiny, light revolver has any right to be. Recoil is light with regular .38sp loads but fairly brisk with the +P ammo -- similar in feel to 125gr .357 rounds through my SP101 snubby. Overall I'm pleased with it.

For those who wonder why someone would carry a revolver rather than a SA handgun, maybe it is because some folks are just more comfortable relying on a revolver. Do you really need a better reason than that?

subzero
08-29-09, 21:27
Several other fellows at the range also tried it out and commented that it was as smooth (and accurate) as their S&W snubs while being substantially lighter.

The LCR weighs 13.5 oz, a 642 is 15oz. An ounce and a half is substantial?

FWIW, the LCRs I've fingered have had MUCH better triggers out of the box than 642s or 442s. I'd put them on par with a slicked up 642 trigger any day.

brushy bill
12-12-09, 21:37
Would someone explain to me why you would practice with a 15 or 17 shot pistol, carry extra magazines and train with it; then turn around and carry a 5 or 6 shot revolver with a short barrel that has a completely different trigger, is difficult to reload and carry the reloads, as well as having completely different sights and ergonomics?

Why not just shove a compact model of your main gun in your pocket?

M_P

Maybe they don't carry a 15 to 17 shot pistol to begin with.
Maybe they use a larger revolver.
Maybe they are concerned with reliability of smaller semi-autos (esp with the smaller 1911s).
I can think of lots of other reasons. Important thing is they are comfortable with what they carry and it will work when needed.