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Jason0311
01-31-12, 23:56
Maybe this is the right forum for my question, if not let me know.

Can the Coleman Camp Fuel be used in old time lanterns? Im assuming kerosene can be. Whats a good source for kerosene?
I usually use whatever "oil lamp fuel" I can find at Wally World and am just wondering what other options I have.

Belmont31R
02-01-12, 00:04
A bit of a tag but Ill be willing to throw this out there. If you burn any type of fuel INSIDE your house have the proper detectors going. Always hear a few stories every year about people burning shit in their house and the family is found dead from poisoning.

Jason0311
02-01-12, 00:54
Yeah me too. But if it has come to the point where Im using oil burning lamps for light my windows will be open for ventilation.

PA PATRIOT
02-01-12, 06:55
Whats a good source for kerosene?

I have seen kerosene sold at gas stations in my area.

Inkslinger
02-01-12, 16:02
Delete

Just a Jarhead
02-01-12, 16:54
Maybe this is the right forum for my question, if not let me know.

Can the Coleman Camp Fuel be used in old time lanterns? Im assuming kerosene can be. Whats a good source for kerosene?
I usually use whatever "oil lamp fuel" I can find at Wally World and am just wondering what other options I have.

I thought Coleman fuel was white gas??? Extremely combustible and never to be used in an oil lantern??? Only in pressurized lanterns. Someone correct me if I'm wrong cause this is serious shit if someone uses it in an oil lantern. Major kaboom. This stuff should never be used indoors.

Get K-1 kerosene from Ace or other hardware stores sold in gallon aluminum cans. Much much cleaner than than k-2 your standard kerosene. K-1 grade is low-sulfur kerosene, with a maximum sulfur content of 0.04 percent by weight, and the latter can contain up to 0.30 percent sulfur. The sulfur content is important because the sulfur in the fuel forms some pretty nasty pollutants when the fuel is burned. Keeping the sulfur content as low as it is in k-1 kerosene allows the fuel to be burned without a flue to remove the exhaust products from the room (such as in a kerosene space heater). K-2 kerosene must/should be burned only in appliances with a flue. It's some dirty stuff. With k-1 you really don't even need to crack a window.

In my oil lamps (high end Aladdin lamps) I use & have stored Aladdin lamp oil, Ultra Pure Lamp Oil by Lamplighter Farms and K-1. All work great.

Inkslinger
02-01-12, 17:55
I thought Coleman fuel was white gas??? Extremely combustible and never to be used in an oil lantern??? Only in pressurized lanterns. Someone correct me if I'm wrong cause this is serious shit if someone uses it in an oil lantern. Major kaboom. This stuff should never be used indoors.

Get K-1 kerosene from Ace or other hardware stores sold in gallon aluminum cans. Much much cleaner than than k-2 your standard kerosene. K-1 grade is low-sulfur kerosene, with a maximum sulfur content of 0.04 percent by weight, and the latter can contain up to 0.30 percent sulfur. The sulfur content is important because the sulfur in the fuel forms some pretty nasty pollutants when the fuel is burned. Keeping the sulfur content as low as it is in k-1 kerosene allows the fuel to be burned without a flue to remove the exhaust products from the room (such as in a kerosene space heater). K-2 kerosene must/should be burned only in appliances with a flue. It's some dirty stuff. With k-1 you really don't even need to crack a window.

In my oil lamps (high end Aladdin lamps) I use & have stored Aladdin lamp oil, Ultra Pure Lamp Oil by Lamplighter Farms and K-1. All work great.

Correct, Coleman fuel should not be used in an oil lamp. Sorry my comment was based on some misinformation.

SteveL
02-01-12, 18:57
I have seen kerosene sold at gas stations in my area.

I used to see it around at gas stations where I live, but I haven't noticed it available anywhere for quite some time.

Dirk Williams
02-01-12, 21:18
#2 Heating oil is a grade of kerosene, and can be used in lamps if needed. We have about 50/60gallons for our lamps it's K1 grade in 2 1/2 gallon plastic jugs.

Im told at least on the west coast that a 50 gallon barrel of #2 can be purchased at reasonable rates, say 2.50 2.60 a gallon. We have a huge tank on the side of the house, it has dyed diesel in it. It can also be used in a pinch. Venting the residence is key.

We get mushroom pickers every year Most are Mong's, a couple die most every year from failing to vent their tents the right way.

Dirk

Jason0311
02-01-12, 23:06
Thanks for all the info guys. I wasn't sure on the Coleman fuel and wanted to get some more input on it. So diesel fuel can be used in these type lamps if need be? Makes since I guess. I'll look around at hardware stores and what not for kerosene.

cinco
02-05-12, 12:47
More than you wanted to know about lantern fuel:p

From here http://www.lanternnet.com/faqs.htm



QUESTION 3: What type of fuel can I use in a tubular lantern?
ANSWER: Standard Lamp Oil, Synthetic Kerosene, or Kerosene Substitute are recommended for use indoors. Clear K-1 Kerosene with a flash point of 124 to 150 degrees is recommended for outside use.

The approved fuels for indoor or outdoor use in Tubular Lanterns and Flat Wick Oil Lamps are:
1. Lamplight Farms® Clear Medallion Brand Lamp Oil, (#60020, #60003 aka #6300, #60005 aka #6400, and #6700 Only ) Flash Point: 145 Degrees Fahrenheit
2. W.M. Barr & Co. Klean-Heat® Kerosene Substitute (#GKKH99991, 128oz, sold by Home Depot SKU #391-171) Flash Point: 145 Degrees Fahrenheit
3. Crown® Brand Clear Lamp Oil (#755946) Flash Point: 141 Degrees Fahrenheit
4. Genuine Aladdin® Brand Lamp Oil (#17552, 32 oz., and #17554, 128 oz.) Flash Point: 141 Degrees Fahrenheit
5. MVP Group International Florasense® Brand Lamp Oil (#MVP73200, 64oz. and #MVP73201, 32 oz., Sold by Wal-Mart ) Flash Point: 142 Degrees Fahrenheit

The approved fuels for outdoor use in Tubular Lanterns and Flat Wick Oil Lamps are:
1. Non-Dyed (Clear) Kerosene with a Flash Point Between 124 and 150 Degrees Fahrenheit
2. Sunnyside® Brand 1-K Kerosene (#700G1, #80132, #801G1, #801G3,and #801G5) Flash Point: 125 Degrees Fahrenheit
3. Coleman® Brand Kerosene Fuel (#3000000270) Flash Point: 130 Degrees Fahrenheit
4. Crown® 1-K Fuel Grade Kerosene (#KEM41, #KEP01, #KEP25, #KEM05) Flash Point: 150 Degrees Fahrenheit
5. Crown® Citronella Torch and Lamp Fuel (#CTLP01, #CTLP02, #CTLP48) (OUTDOOR USE ONLY, cut 50:50 with kerosene to extend wick life.) Flash Point: 141 Degrees Fahrenheit
6. Tiki® Brand Citronella Torch Fuel (OUTDOOR USE ONLY, cut 50:50 with kerosene to extend wick life.) Flash Point: 145 Degrees Fahrenheit

NOTICE: Dyed kerosene or lamp oil will eventually clog the wick and inhibit proper operation. It can also permanently stain the lamp or lantern.
If you purchase kerosene from a gas station, make sure that it is from a "blocked" pump so that it is clear and not dyed red.
(Un-blocked kerosene pumps by law must dispense dyed kerosene which will clog lantern wick, and cause it not to burn properly.)
FUEL SOURCES:
Standard clear lamp oil (Lamp Light Farms Medallion Oil,) is available nationwide at: Target, K-Mart, Ace Hardware, True-Value Hardware, Sentry Hardware, and HWI Do-It Centers.

"Klean-Heat" Kerosene Substitute is available at or through most hardware stores and home centers including: Home Depot, American Eagle, Coast to Coast, Ace Hardware, True-Value, and HWI Do-It Centers.

Genuine Aladdin Brand Lamp Oil is available from Aladdin Lamp Dealers nationwide.

NOTE: DO NOT USE PARAFFIN OIL IN TUBULAR LANTERNS WITH 5/8" or LARGER WICK. (Use Paraffin only in lamps with 1/2" or smaller wick.)

NOTE: DIESEL, BIO-DIESEL AND OLIVE OIL ARE NOT SUITABLE SUBSTITUTES FOR ANY OF THE APPROVED FUELS AS THEY HAVE A FLASH POINT OVER 200 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT


PARAFFIN OIL NOTICE


NOTE: Paraffin in the UK is kerosene. Paraffin Oil in the UNITED STATES is Liquid Candle Wax , and is mis-labeled for use in oil lamps and lanterns, when in fact it is only suited for Candle Oil Lamps that use small diameter (under 1/4”,) round wick. 99% or 100% Paraffin Oil is NOT designed or suitable for use in tubular lanterns or oil lamps that use flat wick, or Kosmos or Matador type oil lamps. Further, it burns only 1/2 as bright of any of the approved fuels listed above. Paraffin oil has a much higher viscosity and a flash point of 200 degrees or higher, as compared to the flash point of 150 degrees for kerosene. These differences inhibit the necessary capillary action of the wick, and will cause Lamps and Lanterns with 7/8" or larger wick to burn improperly and erratic. Once a wick is contaminated with paraffin oil, it must be replaced in order for the lantern to burner properly. If you must use paraffin oil, it may be mixed 1:10 to 2:10 (one to two parts paraffin,) to ten parts standard lamp oil or kerosene so that it will burn satisfactorily. Paraffin Oil is sold in the United States under the following trade names, which should be avoided except for use with lamps or lanterns with 1/4” Round of 1/2" flat or smaller wick :
Aura Oil
Crown Royal
Firelight Glass
Orvis Lamp Fuel
Northern Lights
Northwest
Pure Lite
Soft Light
Tropical Lights
Ultra-Pure
Weems & Plath





WARNING!!







NEVER USE THE FOLLOWING IN ANY WICK LAMP OR LANTERN OF ANY TYPE:

1. Gasoline
2. Coleman Fuel
3. White Gas
4. Paint Thinner, (aka *Mineral Spirits)
5. Wood Alcohol
6. Naptha
7. Turpentine
8. Benzene
9. Or any other Explosive Fuel with a flash point under 100° F.

USING ANY OF THE ABOVE FUELS IN A WICK LAMP OR LANTERN
CAN RESULT IN PROPERTY LOSS, SERIOUS INJURY, OR DEATH.

CAUTION:
Diesel and Aviation fuel should not be used in any wick lamp or lantern
as the fumes from fuel additives can be FATAL if inhaled.




SAFETY WARNING:
UPDATE NOVEMBER 24, 2010

WE STRONGLY RECOMMEND THAT YOU VERIFY THAT THE
FLASH POINT OF ANY KEROSENE THAT YOU PLAN TO USE IN ANY
OIL LAMP OR LANTERN OR KEROSENE HEATER IS
BETWEEN 124 AND 150 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT.

We have started receiving reports of lanterns developing "run-away" flames where the flame flares up and runs out of control.
When this happens, the only way to extinguish the flame is to smother the lantern.
Place an inverted bucket over the lantern, or shovel dirt on it to extinguish the flame.


THE MINIMUM RECOMMENDED FLASH POINT FOR KEROSENE FOR USE IN
OIL LAMPS AND LANTERNS IS 124 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT.





*Additional Notes on Mineral Spirits

I have added the following information due to the number of inquiries we have been receiving lately about the use of paint thinner as a kerosene substitute to explain the danger.

Mineral Spirits (Paint Thinner,) should NOT be used in any wick lamp or lantern.

There is a reason they are called "Kerosene" lanterns, and not "Paint Thinner" lanterns. Tubular lanterns, and most oil lamps that employ a wick delivery system, are designed for use with 150 Degree Test (read "Flash Point,") kerosene, which is a "straight run" petroleum distillate made for such use. Standard Lamp Oil, (such as Lamplight Farms Medallion Lamp Oil,) has a 142 Degree flash point, and is also an acceptable lamp or lantern fuel, being within 10% of the design standard.

Paint Thinner, (Mineral Spirits,) on the other hand, has a flash point of under 110 Degrees, and is a complex petroleum distillate that at best may produce (including odorless,) fumes that are not something that you would want to breathe near, and at worst has the potential for creating a runaway flame or worse.

Let me explain further: In addition to conveying fuel, the wick also conducts heat from the flame into the tank. As the fuel level drops, the oil temperature rises and expands, regardless of the oil you are using. With Mineral Spirits, this function creates an accelerated evaporation, which in turn produces pressurized flammable vapor that must expand to somewhere. (This process is also referred to as "Superheating.") Usually, the pressurized vapor will gradually work its way through the burner and will be consumed at the flame. At this point it is not a major problem, except that because the flame is no longer dependant on the wick, you no longer have control of the flame, which will begin to "runaway." The natural reaction is to turn the wick down as far as possible to try to extinguish the runaway flame. This only increases the vapor flow as well as the flame size. If you turn the wick down too far, and the cogs disengage the wick, you will not be able to raise the wick to reduce the flame size. When this happens, the best course of action is to smother the lantern with an inverted pail or bucket, or dirt.

In a worst case scenario, if the pressurized vapor is unable to gradually be consumed at the flame, it will increase in the tank as the fuel level drops. The reason this is "worst case" is because if the vapor bursts through the burner, an explosion will result that will most likely shatter the globe.


I received an e-mail from a customer that thought it was OK to use paint thinner, despite our warning:

. . . . . I look up and the flame is so high that it burnt the rope, fell from the tree, shattered and the ground and lantern were on fire. I put the fire out and just assumed I did something wrong. The next night I set the second one on a flat tree stump. Every thing seems fine, not much light because the wick is so low, but a little. Next thing I know this one is on fire and the glass also breaks and I'm scrambling to throw dirt on it. The third night I try again, because it gets really dark and I was counting on those for light. This lantern does the same thing. It did not break the glass, because I was nervous and kept watching it. . . .
Fil Graff, the Secretary of the International Guild of Lamp Researchers, wrote the following words on the topic:


On Dec. 22, 2000 @ 18:57, Fil Graff (fgraff@comcast.net) wrote:
. . . . For heavens sake, if you are playing with fuels, stay in the same petrochemical CLASS as the originally recommended fuel! NO MINERAL SPIRITS in a kerosene lamp! That is NO, none, not ANY! The "burns hotter" may be a problem in soldered burners, but the real problem is volatility and flash point. You do NOT want a possible font ignition from heated fumes! If you cannot get road-taxed kerosene (it isn't red!)or Sunoco's "1-K", then try the Clearlite. It too burns hotter than kerosene, but at least is in the same volatility range, and therefore reasonably safe. I use it in Aladdins and other flat wicks, replacing the Champagne-priced odorless Ultra fuel I used for years, but have abandoned because of outrageous prices.
Tony Batts, General Manager of the Aladdin Mantle Lamp Company, recently e-mailed me:

"Woody,
You are most correct, we would never recommend the use of mineral spirits or paint thinner in Aladdin lamps, lanterns, or any flat wick lamps. Believe it or not we still occasionally get calls from folks who have heard the its okay to use mineral spirits in their lamps.

Thanks for helping clear up this myth!

With kind regards,
Tony"
We are working towards adding video segments to our website in the near future, and plan to film a demonstration of what can happen when you use paint thinner, or "other than recommended" fuels in tubular lanterns.
Copyright © 1997 - 2011 W.T. Kirkman All Rights Reserved

Armati
02-05-12, 21:57
Great post cinco.

I can only add what I know. My pappy lived near the woods in the Pine Barrens of NJ. He had electricity but mostly he used a coal pot belly stove and oil lamps. He used kerosene from the local gas station in his lanterns. Lanterns were for outdoor use only. Indoors he had wick type oil lamps with a glass flue. These burned liquid paraffin.

digdug18
02-09-12, 21:44
Coleman Fuel CANNOT be used in anything other than a coleman lantern/cooker.

According to the coleman lantern manual I have for my 220F, coleman fuel is high quality gasoline. It says that in a pinch you can use gasoline, but that you'll need to thoroughly clean the system afterwards.