PDA

View Full Version : Lithium AA batteries...prone to leaking?



WS6
02-02-12, 07:20
I understand that even with the Aimpoint's long battery-life, you should still change batteries out every now and then. My question is, are the Lithium AA batteries prone to (or capable of?) leaking and ruining the optic? Has anyone seen this/heard of this? I have a lot of remotes that don't work because of alkaline batteries doing this, so I would never put one of them in a $$$ optic, but will the lithiums eventually leak too, or not?

trukreltrog
02-02-12, 07:32
I run Lithiums in my one Eotech for that reason, less chance of leaking. They don't seem to drain over time like the alkaline batteries either,,,:)

markm
02-02-12, 08:04
I never knew there was such a thing... but I'm not very electronics oriented.

We had an aimpoint with an alkaline that puked on the inside. :mad:

WS6
02-02-12, 09:04
I never knew there was such a thing... but I'm not very electronics oriented.

We had an aimpoint with an alkaline that puked on the inside. :mad:

Damage to the optic?

markm
02-02-12, 09:23
Damage to the optic?

No. The battery was in the early stages of puking. It was in an M4s that had been shelved. Crust in the battery compartment, but not bad enough to impact function.

WS6
02-02-12, 09:32
No. The battery was in the early stages of puking. It was in an M4s that had been shelved. Crust in the battery compartment, but not bad enough to impact function.

Good news, then. I asked Aimpoint and they said that if the battery leaked, the optic was DONE. I don't know if this means it destroyed the electronics, or if they were just agreeing that if the contacts were destroyed, obviously it was kaput. I don't know where all a leak could go in an aimpoint as mine is not here yet to finger.

Doc Glockster
02-02-12, 09:56
Leakage is a good reason to always remove the batteries from an optic or anything in storage. Still, does anyone know of a flat, or calculator type battery like in the Aimpoint T1 ever leaking?

JSantoro
02-02-12, 10:52
Guys, ALL batteries may leak.

There's no statistically significant difference between lithium or alkaline as to which is more prone to leaking or not. That's more a matter of whether or not you're buying some cut-rate Paki battery, or a first-rate one made in a non-3rd-World country.

Leaky lithiums are more likely to have violent reactions with their surroundings, particularly in the wet (causes fires), so folks tend to turn that into "more likely to leak!" because they're hearing hoofbeats in the distance and thinking "Zebras!" without bothering to consider that it might just be regular 'ol horses.

Check all batteries for leakage, cracks in the casing, dents, ANY deformities prior to use. If any are present, do not use, discard. Try to not store things with batteries in the compartments unless you have a compelling reason to do so.

markm
02-02-12, 10:54
I'm moving this thread to the equestrian forum.:happy:

WS6
02-02-12, 11:24
Guys, ALL batteries may leak.

There's no statistically significant difference between lithium or alkaline as to which is more prone to leaking or not. That's more a matter of whether or not you're buying some cut-rate Paki battery, or a first-rate one made in a non-3rd-World country.

Leaky lithiums are more likely to have violent reactions with their surroundings, particularly in the wet (causes fires), so folks tend to turn that into "more likely to leak!" because they're hearing hoofbeats in the distance and thinking "Zebras!" without bothering to consider that it might just be regular 'ol horses.

Check all batteries for leakage, cracks in the casing, dents, ANY deformities prior to use. If any are present, do not use, discard. Try to not store things with batteries in the compartments unless you have a compelling reason to do so.

Wouldn't an Aimpoint be a reason to "store" the battery in the compartment? It's always supposed to be on.

Cesiumsponge
02-02-12, 11:55
I make it a habit to change lithium batteries on my birthday because its easy to remember. What's $20 in new lithiums once a year? I've never had a lithium puke. Lithium-ion rechargables are known to puke, usually under abusive high-current discharge, in spectacular fashion but they're quite reliable from a reputable manufacturer.

a0cake
02-02-12, 12:24
JS, I can't agree with you here like I do in almost all other topics...and I do understand that this is a ridiculously long reply for a battery conversation.

Disposable lithium batteries generally have semi-solid electrolyte cells unlike the liquid in Alkaline batteries. While it is possible for lithium AA's to rupture, it is far less likely because they are manufactured with "armor" around the cells to protect them from physical damage and extreme environmental conditions. In order for the lithium to contact anything to cause a reaction, the battery would have to get almost cut in half to expose the semi-solid electrolytes since they can't leak in a traditional way, or it would have to be held underwater for a significant amount of time. In either case, the lithium battery holds out longer than the alkaline. But that's not even the key point here.

The main difference is that when Alkaline batteries are discharged too far, they automatically leak. Lithium batteries, on the other hand, become 100% inert and do not leak when they're completely empty. This is why lithium batteries can be thrown in the regular trash when they're used up but alkalines cannot. So if you forget to remove batteries before putting a device in long term storage, make it a lithium.

The only time I've seen CR123's and lithium AA's fail is when they've gotten wet and stayed wet for a long time. It smells bad and you can tell something's not right but it's not like what happens in the chemistry lab when you drop lithium into water. I'm sure it COULD be under the right conditions, but it's not a legitimate consideration in practice.






Guys, ALL batteries may leak.

There's no statistically significant difference between lithium or alkaline as to which is more prone to leaking or not. That's more a matter of whether or not you're buying some cut-rate Paki battery, or a first-rate one made in a non-3rd-World country.

Leaky lithiums are more likely to have violent reactions with their surroundings, particularly in the wet (causes fires), so folks tend to turn that into "more likely to leak!" because they're hearing hoofbeats in the distance and thinking "Zebras!" without bothering to consider that it might just be regular 'ol horses.

Check all batteries for leakage, cracks in the casing, dents, ANY deformities prior to use. If any are present, do not use, discard. Try to not store things with batteries in the compartments unless you have a compelling reason to do so.

JSantoro
02-02-12, 13:04
Yeah, I'll cop to a certain level of institutional infection in terms of this by those that write the safety messages and ram what amounts to technical nonsense down the throats of the operational forces, but I also have also seen far, far too many optical devices with their battery compartments corroded into uselessness by batteries purported to be "safer" from a leakage aspect. I'm JUST familiar with the chemical aspect to know that that's not how it's supposed to be, but....

Always seemed to trace back to crap batteries, though, which is why I brought it up, above.

With a quality lithium of ANY size, I'm less worried about leakage than I am as to it's born-on date, what conditions it's been stored in, and how much altitude change its seen in transit...2 of those 3 I'm generally incapable of knowing. ;)