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Thread: Glock trigger guard undercut.

  1. #1
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    Glock trigger guard undercut.

    I need to get the trigger guard on my glock 19 undercut. Who would you guys recommend ?

    The only place that would do it nearby is going to cost $150. I also need the mag release on the gun trimmed down a little bit too because it is a gen 4 and the mag release button is huge.

  2. #2
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    It's just plastic.

    Sharpen your pocket knife and whittle off what you don't want, then clean it up with some emory cloth.

  3. #3
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    Pocket knife? What is this, the 1880s? Just kidding, bro.

    Option 1) Get a Dremel aka the Wonder Tool (ok, only I call it that). You can use the grinding stone to do this. Put it on low and go slow!

    Option 2) Or for better results but more time consuming, pick out a round wooden dowel close to the radius you want. Put the frame in a vice, wrap the dowel in some sandpaper, and slowly go back and forth keeping the dowel even.

    For either Option 1 or 2, use a buffing wheel on the Dremel, or some emery cloth if you don't have one, and polish it up. If you use the Dremel, do NOT stay in one area too long. Cranking the RPMs up is fine, but if you stay in one area too long - the frame will begin to melt from the friction. And it's a bitch to clean it up nice once it's melted.

    If you buy a Dremel, get the corded version with micro adjustable RPMs. The cordless, macro adjustable RPM version is a turd.

    Hope this helps.

  4. #4
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    To get it to look its best, use a Dremel sanding wheel. Once you get it close to where you want it, use a buffing wheel with a little compound. Be careful to go at a slower speed. If it heats up to much due to friction, out of nowhere you'll take out much more than intended.

    Here's one of the M&Ps I've done.



    This is a different one where I rounded the sides a bit more and didn't cut it out as much. Sorry these are M&Ps, but I'm content with my Glocks. $150 for just undercutting the trigger guard is a bit much, it's not a 1911.

    Last edited by jonconsiglio; 03-20-12 at 23:33.
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~ Paul Howe

  5. #5
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    The dremel option is intimidating. I have never used one on plastic before.

    I think I can make it work for the mag release pretty easily.

  6. #6
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    No reason to be intimidated. You totally control the speed and pressure. You can hover it just away from the nylon and not take off anything, then gently work it in to barely scrape the surface.

    It's pretty funny, when doing it to remove the Gen 3 finger grooves a few months ago (I used the sanding drum), I got it warm enough to smell the nylon - smells exactly like 550 cord. Hilarious.

    [[Link]] to absolute most basic dremeling (removal of grooves). I'll clean it up and probably add stippling at some point.
    Last edited by CumbiaDude; 03-21-12 at 00:54.

  7. #7
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    I use a 1/2" wooden dowel with 80 grit sand paper wrapped around it. Once I have it close, I switch to 120 grit, then 220. After that I use a buffing wheel on my dremel to finish it up. You could stick with the dowel, as I did in the past, just keep going to less course grits, like 600, etc. The first 3 Glocks I did was with just the dowel and they turned out really well.

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