G&R Tactical
Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 41 to 45 of 45

Thread: Sleeping bags - 2016

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    42
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by jbjh View Post
    Gear whores will recognize this as a great endorsement.
    just my opinion
    I was looking at FF and Western Mountaineering, at the time FF had more option on colors than WM, so I went with them. I only use that bag for my through hikes when the weight is an issue and I giggle like a little school girl when I get it out of the closet. The quality is that good. If I ever upgrade I would take a hard look at a down quilt and a good sleeping pad

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    33
    Feedback Score
    0
    I use a pair of SOL escape bivvies, with velcro seams. the inside one also has a drawstring hood and another drawstring at the neck. I also carry a pair of 3 ft wide tyvek bags, with velcro seams, which I can slip over the hammock, from either end. With the right clothing, that's good down to +20F and I sleep "cold". If it's colder than that, hostile action will nearly have ceased, so it will be safe enough to use Mors Korchanski's "super shelter' plastic sheet faced lean-to (the lean to being formed by opening the inside bivvy down one side. The other bivvy serves as a reflective "facing" for a stick "wall", set up on the far side of the wall, to reflect more of its heat towards me. The clear "wettable" plastic sheeting , clamped to the tyvek bags (opened flat and Velcroed together into a tarp) lets-in radiant heat, but then it is trapped in the shelter with me. If staying in that area, dig under the fire, as much as possible, to create, over time, a shallow dakota pit, so as to minimize the wood needed and also to minimize light seen at night.

    my "hammock" is 64 ft of monofilament gill net, 2.5" mesh, 5 ft wide, folded back on itself 3x and tied. That thing can feed you, if you know how to use it properly.
    Last edited by helluva; 05-12-16 at 20:07.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    O'ahu
    Posts
    4,393
    Feedback Score
    68 (100%)
    After reading this thread and looking around some, I bought a Nemo Nocturne 30 Long sleeping bag. I have several Nemo products since they have a great discount on Promotive and they have all been fantastic, so I decided to give one of their bags a shot. I wanted something less bulky than the issued sleep system for the JRTC rotation I had last month. I used it quite a bit and it is definitely the most comfortable sleeping bag I have ever used. Some of the extra features like the pillow pocket and blanket fold were really nice but I was surprised at how cold I still got when using it. The temperatures for the month averaged to 47 with a low of 35. I know temperature ratings are usually optimistic but it only took one night in just the bag before I grabbed my OP Tactical woobie (which is awesome) and tucked it in the bag with me. That ended up being a winning combo and was great for almost every cold night there was. The one exception was when the condensation was ridiculous. We all woke up thinking that it had poured because of how soaked everything was. I felt like I was swimming inside the bag. I was cold but not overly so, I think the downtek helped me there. But it was still miserable enough that I'm now looking for a bivy bag to use with it next time we're in an area that doesn't really allow the use of a poncho hooch. I don't know how much it would have helped since all that moisture was from condensation, but I'll need one when it rains anyways. I'm leaning towards the Wiggy's one, mostly because of the positive comments here and the fact that I can get it in Multicam. Any opinions on that piece?
    Sic semper tyrannis.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    25
    Feedback Score
    0
    I just got a snugpak elite 1. It's good for moderate temps here in CA where I'm at it also expands which I really like
    I make non monetized videos on YouTube.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    560
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)
    Check the width on lighter bags. Wiggys are often cut roomier. While you aren't going to be as efficient if you are heating up a lot of empty bag, you are going to conduct cold if you are mashing the insulation down on the top or sides. Same reason why some bags have less or no bottom insulation and why some people have switched over to lightweight insulated quilts.

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •