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Thread: Ported barrels for defensive pistols?

  1. #1
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    Ported barrels for defensive pistols?

    I'm looking at getting my first handgun and I really like these Glock models with the ported barrel. I'm getting lots of different opinions on whether or not a ported barrel is a good idea for a defensive pistol. I'm worried about muzzle flash and temporary blindness if I ever have to use my weapon at night. And let's be honest, almost all crimes happen at night.

    Sent from my LGLS991 using Tapatalk

  2. #2
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    Porting is decidedly less efficient at controlling muzzle rise/recoil than a compensator.
    Both systems operate with gas/chamber pressure.
    While the 9mm operates at reasonably high chamber pressure for a pistol, the +P or +P+ loadings will be most efficient with either porting or compensator.
    Realistically, a 9mm is pretty easy to control at speed.
    Personally I would pass on the ported barrel idea. I don't see the possible gain being worth the expense and hassle.

  3. #3
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    I think it would be a 'cool factor' for a bedside or basic defense gun for the everyman. The pros versus cons do not seem to validate the expense and offset (i.e. add) performance. That's JMO.

  4. #4
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    Just borrow one from someone and shoot it at night. The negative will be self evident.
    "Every step we take towards making the State our Caretaker of our lives, by that much we move toward making the State our Master." Dwight D. Eisenhower

  5. #5
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    Bells and whistles are good, but shooting effectively is better. If this is your first pistol, I would suggest going to a range, pay for some instruction, get the basics down, and then rent a bunch of pistols that fit your hand, and you shoot well. My first pistol mostly sits in my safe, since I like my 2nd (HK USP 45) and 3rd (40 S&W P226R) WAY better. I shoot them better too.

    I have never liked Glocks, just don't sit right in my hand. I bought my SIG P226 because I kept shooting ten rings with a friend's. "Wow, do that again..." and I did.

    My Sig fits my hand like it was made for it - the sights naturally align, and I shoot it really well, even when I haven't shot it in a while. Which reminds me...

    Take your time. There are a lot of great pistols out there. You gotta find the one that was built for you.

  6. #6
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    IMO, ported pistols are absolutely a no-go on a defensive pistol. The massive muzzle flash up into your line of sight at night, while bad, is not the worst issue. The ports are capable of "shaving" pieces of the bullet as it passes by, spitting them straight up out of the end of the barrel. So while shooting a ported pistol as a range gun would be fine, in defensive use shooting from retention is a possibility. That burning gunpowder and bullet particulate is then blasted up at your face. Not good.
    "Guns are like neurosurgeons. When you need one, you need one badly."

  7. #7
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    Good points above (don't get a ported pistol).

    In addition, there are a couple of more advanced shooting techniques that you won't be able to safely accomplish with a ported gun.

    Whatever you get. Dry practice a lot and get some training.
    Last edited by BadgerPeak; 05-07-17 at 22:28.

  8. #8
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    Ported no
    Comp maybe
    Rmr maybe
    Rolland special no
    Rmr and silencer yes

    With a threaded barrel for a glock 26 or 19 you have options. Factory barrel, comped, or suppressed. Or in a different way standard, bedside, bedside.

    Dont get cool accecories untill you notice you are being limited by your gear. Some parts and accessories or very niche, some are usless. If you want to, get a quality threaded barrel, new sights, and a 25 cent or a thousand round trigger job.

    Importance: gun, holster, ammo, mags... ect

    Imho if you want the benefit of a ported gun then buy a threaded barrel and a comp.



    Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk

  9. #9
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    I vote no on the ported handgun. If you have a local range you can test fire a few guns I suggest trying that or shoot a buddies handgun. Once you find one you are comfortable with just practice as much as you can, including low light conditions.

  10. #10
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    Let me provide an anecdotal but descriptive account.

    15 years ago, I had an acquaintance who had a Glock 23C. At the same time, I had G23 Gen 2 usually stocked with 135gr CorBon.

    Shooting side by side, the 23C was somewhat louder. Otherwise, the control did not seem dramatically better. Inside and outside in less than total darkness, I never noticed the muzzle flash was debilitating. Maybe there was more flash, I cannot say that it made a difference to my shooting. My experience is just that, based on actual side by side testing of less than 200 rounds. I would not have personally bought a compensated Glock After my experience.

    I would not wish a Glock 23 on anyone. The .40SW juice is just not worth the squeeze - too much recoil, flash and drama compared to the 9mm. I never mastered the Gen 2 frame. I now run two 9mm Gen 4s plus two Glock pattern ARs.

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