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Thread: survival German shepard dogs

  1. #21
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    I would check out your local gsd rescue. These dogs are a lot of work and people dump them all to frequently. Not only will you find a great dog, but you will also be taking one that was abandoned.

    I have had my current rescue shepherd for 10 years now. He did have hip displaysia in one hip. We removed his ball in his hip and you would not be able to tell the difference. The old man would put it all on the line to protect my wife or kids.

  2. #22
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    I don't have much more to add other than a picture of our two girls

    Neither of ours have any sort of professional or "protection" training but I couldnt recommend GSDs enough for a family, especially if you live in the country. With very little work they're both awesome dogs, they listen real well and really seem to know when its "play" time versus "rest" time. We live in 30 acres (surrounded by hundreds more) and if nothing else they do a heck of a job keeping coyotes, bears and foxes away from the property. Unfortunately they keep the turkey away too....but its a fair trade off IMO.

    One thing I would re-iterate though, I wouldnt recommend them if you are living in an apartment or city and don't have space for them. They are built for activity, and if ours go a couple days without some real good exercise outdoors they can get antsy. Nothing bad, just messing with the cat or pushing each other around more, etc. Like a lot of breeds they need their exercise.




  3. #23
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    Not really sure if this is the right place for this post.. but I think it shows how much they become a part of the family and it just makes me feel a little better so oh well...

    My Mollie probably only has a few days left. She's in the final stages of kidney failure and won't eat anything anymore. She's only 3 and is just one of the most amazing special dogs I've ever known.

    She's still excited to play and wants to go everywhere with us. We are making sure her final days are filled with all of the things that she loves.

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by dontshakepandas View Post
    Not really sure if this is the right place for this post.. but I think it shows how much they become a part of the family and it just makes me feel a little better so oh well...

    My Mollie probably only has a few days left. She's in the final stages of kidney failure and won't eat anything anymore. She's only 3 and is just one of the most amazing special dogs I've ever known.

    She's still excited to play and wants to go everywhere with us. We are making sure her final days are filled with all of the things that she loves.

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
    Terribly sorry to hear about your girl. Unfortunately stuff like kidney/organ failure at such a young age is often due to the breeder not doing their due diligence by getting their dogs health tested and screened for genetic defects prior to breeding them. Your girl was also lacking pigment which is one of the signs of genetic degeneration.

    If you get another GSD, I highly recommend finding a reputable breeder that offers a health guarantee and make sure both the sire and dam are DM clear and have good hip/elbow ratings. I don't care so much about sport titles, but good health and temperament for dogs in a breeding program are an absolute must.
    Last edited by ClearedHot; 06-08-17 at 19:46.

  5. #25
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    Thanks for the comments and advice guys.

    We had to let her go yesterday, and even though it's probably the most painful things I've ever been through I wouldn't trade a second with her for anything. We made sure her last days were filled with happiness and that she didn't hurt.

    I'll certainly be getting another German Shepherd. It will probably be sooner than later but I do feel like I need some time to heal.

    We will get our next one from a breeder and will make sure all of the necessary health checks are done.

    R.I.P. my sweet Mollie.

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

  6. #26
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    I'm not here to bash German sherpards , cause I think they are great working/Leo/military dogs, but I have a few questions.
    If we are talking about a true shtf survival scenario wouldn't someone want more of a "mutt" type of dog? I feel a German sherpard would require more medical attention/problems for someone just trying to survive. They are prone to hip dsplacia pretty early in their lives right? ive own some mutts growing up and they were always the healthiest/hardy dogs. Never have any medical problems or needs, They just flat out survived till they fell over dead.
    Curious what you guys think?

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by TacticalTyler View Post
    I'm not here to bash German sherpards , cause I think they are great working/Leo/military dogs, but I have a few questions.
    If we are talking about a true shtf survival scenario wouldn't someone want more of a "mutt" type of dog? I feel a German sherpard would require more medical attention/problems for someone just trying to survive. They are prone to hip dsplacia pretty early in their lives right? ive own some mutts growing up and they were always the healthiest/hardy dogs. Never have any medical problems or needs, They just flat out survived till they fell over dead.
    Curious what you guys think?
    While the breed itself is prone to such issues, getting a puppy from a breeder who health screens the parents and has the elbows and hips certified and rated can significantly reduced that chance.

    Most breeds have some type of chronic issue, and there is always just bad luck such as my Mollie who recently passed away. You'd still have that same chance with a mutt, but without knowing what kind of drive it protective instincts the dog would have.

    Picture of my new pup just because.

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

  8. #28
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    Very nice looking pup.

    Right now our little guy is 6 months old and weighs over 60 pounds, sometimes have to remind myself sometimes that he is just a pup.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by dontshakepandas View Post
    While the breed itself is prone to such issues, getting a puppy from a breeder who health screens the parents and has the elbows and hips certified and rated can significantly reduced that chance.

    Most breeds have some type of chronic issue, and there is always just bad luck such as my Mollie who recently passed away. You'd still have that same chance with a mutt, but without knowing what kind of drive it protective instincts the dog would have.

    Picture of my new pup just because.

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
    Beautiful looking puppy. I love the oyster ear phase!

    I have a nearly 6 year old GSD. He's been a wonderful dog and fiercely loyal family companion. To the OP, take the advice you've been given seriously. GSD's are a huge responsibility and will be around for 13 years or longer (if you're lucky). That's a lot of dog hair to pick up!! They shed, a lot. I found a trainer and took the time for basic and some advanced obedience training. My boy achieved his K9 Good Companion certificate and then I let his training die down. It's on me to keep things going. Regular exercise. Regular runs. Regular energy releases are all there, but I can tell he misses the training. As mentioned, ask yourself what you want your GSD to be and then develop a clear understanding of the time, cost and commitment it will take to get there. Your GSD will be always be up to the challenge. It's on us, the owners, to deliver.

    I too learned a hard lesson on breeders. Definitely do your research and if possible, call local vets after you've found someone you think is a reputable breeder. Personally, I don't think you have to spend thousands on a solid GSD. There are plenty of owner/breeders out there that truly love the bloodline and provide pups at a reasonable price. You don't necessarily get what you pay for. I paid sub $1,000 and have what I think of as a perfect GSD.

    Equally important to obedience training is proper socialization. I read up on the subject and was determined to socialize my GSD inside the home and out. This is important because when you have people over, they will stop dead in their tracks at the sight of your 100 pound beast, with ears up, staring at them. I have two teenagers now and their friends come over regularly. My male GSD checks them all out, licks and sniffs and then leaves them alone. He has although, let a couple of them know who's boss! Never a bite, but he has nipped and scared a few away when he was either on his bed or wrapped up with one of my sons. That's their nature - protective.

    One last thing... In a shtf scenario, I see the benefits of having a protective dog for defensive purposes. Food and water for an extra person are obvious shortcomings, but I'd also consider the fact that your GSD will bark at the site of danger. If you're trying to not attract attention, this will be counter intuitive. Just something to think about. Good luck with your decision.
    Here in America we are descended in spirit from revolutionists and rebels - men and women who dare to dissent from accepted doctrine. ~Dwight D. Eisenhower, address, Columbia University, 31 May 1954

  10. #30
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    I have one, she is an incredible protection dog, and is too smart for her own good sometimes. They really do provide a security blanket that is hard to get rid of. If there is so much as a creak in the night I hear ours get up to go investigate it and then lazily plop back down when there is nothing to see.

    However, I will echo what many others have said. High drive, working line shepherds require a ton of attention, exercise, and training. Ours is 8 years old and has blown one knee and still has not slowed down. In fact, I still think of her as a puppy because her energy and drive levels have never gone down. If you live in an apartment, or confined home in the city, you are going to have problems. If you do not have the time to really work on OB and whatever other purpose you have devised for the GSD, you are going to have a ton of unchecked drive and that will make you crazy.

    For survival, well I got a gut check years back when I lived in Oklahoma and started to make my bug-out bag for tornado season. 72 hours of food and water is no light object. The vast majority of GSDs i've seen trained up are not suitable for any sort of protection work, and many won't bite if they can't see the bite sleeve.

    GSDs are not like having any other kind of dog, they along with Mals, dutchies, etc require a pretty significant commitment that should not be taken lightly. I would be sure to meet with breeders and explain goals, home situation, and time availability. Furthermore, I would have a trainer already lined up to work with that has significant experience with working line dogs BEFORE purchasing one. Training starts on day one, and never really stops.

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