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Thread: Realistic AR home defense scenarios--things to think about

  1. #91
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    I made no assumptions.

    Clearing a house all by your lonesome is not easy. Oftentimes you get one good opportunity for violence of action. You mess that up, the numbers game is against you.

    If I pushed you down as hard as I can while you are in full battle rattle, honestly how quick could you recover?

    Now add two other people on top of you and an injury.

    I have been consistent. Bunker in place, have a plan for such, have a designated RP in home.

    But when guys think they are going to be successful just by having an AR or a PC....naw.

    Typically they dont want a stand up fight but you may well be the guy whose turn it is in the cracker barrel and meet some shooters.

    All I know is there are men who actively train, prepare, do this for a job, have all the good kit, and some to not go home that day.

    There's how we think we will fight and how we actually end up fighting and it is solely dependent on the adversary.

    These people have all day and night to try to hit you at your most vulnerable.

    But, not my life. I just a guy who has seen the aftermath of quite a few home invasions so take me with a grain of salt.

  2. #92
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    Motion sensor outdoor flood lights, good doors with good locks, and a dog that weighs at least 40lbs as first wave deterrent. Heck, have two fur-missiles! This should buy me the seconds to grab my handgun with weapon mounted light, muster the wifey to collect our young daughter, and hunker in bedroom while calling 911.

  3. #93
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    I keep my carry pistol beside the bed, in holster, condition 1, long guns (12 ga & AR) in closet about 8’ away in condition 3. Two story house with MBR at one end, from which I have a clear view of the top of the front stairs and down the hall about 40’ to the top of the back stairs.

    Outside the MBR door is a nightlight integrated within a wall switch that shines down the hall, away from the MBR, this provides dim lighting of the hall and top of the front stairs, and makes the MBR appear very dark to anyone approaching.

    The house has a wired alarm that covers all downstairs doors and windows, plus a glass break detector. It has interior and exterior sirens, but it only calls my cell phone – no monitoring service (I think they are a waste).

    Our plan is to defend in place, not clear the house. We (just wife & I) live in a suburban area with pretty good response time by LE, so I will let them go “hood hunting”. Wife to call 911 from floor/cover position behind the bed. Which weapon I go for depends on whether or not I think the BG’s are inside the house when I wake up, and of course that I haven’t expired from a heart attack upon being awakened from a dead sleep by the alarm .

    My biggest concern is the time it takes to get to one of the long guns in the closet, and I may decide to relocate one or both closer to the bed, but I’ll have to overcome some spousal resistance if they are in view.


    Quote Originally Posted by vicious_cb View Post
    Devised by a real world face shooter. This is probably the most effective and comprehensive home defense strategy Ive ever seen.

    https://primaryandsecondary.com/foru...-strategy.770/
    On a side note, the guy in the link above who’s stationed rifles all over his house, including the foyer, should think about locking his front door as a first step - just saying.
    Last edited by Bryan; 01-24-18 at 16:34. Reason: spelling

  4. #94
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    Whatever plan you develop, make it stone axe simple and quick to implement. The more complicated the plan is, the more that can go wrong. If you have children in the home, practice dry run scenarios with them. Ask your children to not share the information with others, not even the fact that you are practicing defense against an attack. Expect your children to share the information. Develop Plan B to respond to a situation in which your family does not react well under stress and they do not act according to Plan A, which is likely.

    Place a trauma bandage in a few places throughout your home that are readily accessible should a family member or you get seriously injured. The trauma bandage is useful if someone is injured in an accident. If you live in a 2 story home, have a device that would allow you to escape from the second floor without using a stairway should it become necessary. It would also be handy in the event there is a house fire.

    For you and your spouse, develop the mindset it is acceptable to knock holes in walls, break windows and break other things while defending yourself or trying to escape. People don't often think about this concept until we bring it up in a class.

    Practice moving through your house in complete darkness. If your plan is to stay in place and wait for the police, events may change and you may be forced to sneak out of the house to protect yourself and your family.
    Train 2 Win

  5. #95
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    Piggybacking to what T2C said, if you live on a two story; invest in those emergency ladders.

    Not just for HI but fires as well. A 5 year old could and should learn super basic first aid (wrapping a bandage/applying gauze).

    Have at least 3 known rally points outside the house, preferably a trusted neighbor.

    If you ditch the house, you don't look back.

    Also keep cyalume lights and reflective belts and discuss light discipline. Show the kids how to activate once safe and let 911 know they may have one activated so some rookie or whatever doesn't get spooked if they come up on something running at him.

  6. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by T2C View Post
    Whatever plan you develop, make it stone axe simple and quick to implement. The more complicated the plan is, the more that can go wrong. If you have children in the home, practice dry run scenarios with them. Ask your children to not share the information with others, not even the fact that you are practicing defense against an attack. Expect your children to share the information. Develop Plan B to respond to a situation in which your family does not react well under stress and they do not act according to Plan A, which is likely.

    Place a trauma bandage in a few places throughout your home that are readily accessible should a family member or you get seriously injured. The trauma bandage is useful if someone is injured in an accident. If you live in a 2 story home, have a device that would allow you to escape from the second floor without using a stairway should it become necessary. It would also be handy in the event there is a house fire.

    For you and your spouse, develop the mindset it is acceptable to knock holes in walls, break windows and break other things while defending yourself or trying to escape. People don't often think about this concept until we bring it up in a class.

    Practice moving through your house in complete darkness. If your plan is to stay in place and wait for the police, events may change and you may be forced to sneak out of the house to protect yourself and your family.
    One of the finest posts I have ever read, sir. Thank you.

  7. #97
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    As I read this Iím house sitting for my aunt & uncle. Their house was broken into about 8 years ago so now whenever they go somewhere for more than a few days they ask me to watch the place for them. 2 story house wth alarm system & no dog. Door leading into garage only has a knob lock (no deadbolt) and the attached screen room has a sliding glass that leads outside and French doors leading inside. No dog, and nobody else to worry about.

    EDC on the nightstand in its holster, rifle with light attached next to bed. Iím hunkering in place upstairs with my rifle until the police arrive 20+ mins later.
    Last edited by MWAG19919; 01-30-18 at 11:13.

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