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Thread: Narcan (Naloxone) Training

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vandal View Post
    I've never seen a normal use patient OD on opiates. That's not saying it doesn't happen, I just haven't seen it. To date it is currently just junkies. They are also the only one's I see carrying narcan or naloxone in their kits. So if they do OD, one of their doper friends can try to bring them back. Heck here in the Seattle area dopers can get their narcan for free, though it is advertised to family members of opiate users and not those using prescribed meds.

    If you've never seen a doper get their high ruined by an opiate blocker, it's a sight to see. The last one tried to reach for my duty belt and ended up face down in the gutter.
    You’ve never seen legit users OD because central doesn’t send cops to old ladies that are napping a little too hard for their families comfort.

    Titrate to breathing and the junkies won’t grab you. You are doing it wrong, which is one of the reasons I would prefer cops to have BVM’s and know how to use them.

  2. #42
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    Like many here I have given a lot of narcan to intentional OD users of heroine. But the one time where it wasn't accidental presents a watershed moment in your career. Use your BVM and administer the narcan. Granted IV administration of narcan provides better control and thus titration of the antidote. Police don't really have the luxury of titration. Nasal administration is often all or none. Nasal administration is also slower into the patients blood system. But please be patient.

    Yes we live in a drug abuse world. Yes it gets old and fatiguing going to the same H OD every day. Support each other. Take advantage of the brotherhood and sisterhood that keeps us all going. When I am done with this profession, I will never miss the runs. I will miss my brothers and sisters who I served with.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1168 View Post
    You’ve never seen legit users OD because central doesn’t send cops to old ladies that are napping a little too hard for their families comfort.

    Titrate to breathing and the junkies won’t grab you. You are doing it wrong, which is one of the reasons I would prefer cops to have BVM’s and know how to use them.
    Unattended deaths in WA require LE response. As I said, I'm not saying it doesn't happen, I just have yet to see it. Medics on scene brought the guy I mentioned back, he wanted to fight as soon as his eyes opened.
    Reads a lot, posts little.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krazykarl View Post
    We have a duty to respond and help those in need. It will be someone else's decision long after transport and we have returned to quarters. Do we think that the guy who beat his wife, burned his child, or has abused enough booze and drugs to be a regular frequent flyer deserves less than cordial treatment? Absolutely. But we still have to attend to them.
    Will you bear the responsibility of all the dopers [for lack of a betterword] future crimes?

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveS View Post
    Will you bear the responsibility of all the dopers [for lack of a betterword] future crimes?
    I bear no responsibility for any one's future crimes. No one can. We are paid a job to perform a skill set when 911 is dialed. If aid can't be rendered, there is a hiring list with hundreds of names behind mine that will step up.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveS View Post
    Will you bear the responsibility of all the dopers [for lack of a betterword] future crimes?
    If you come into the ED unconscious, for whatever reason, do you want the ED doctor to start your care by first evaluating whether or not they should begin resuscitating you? Do you want doctors', nurses', and EMTs' first job in treating a patient in the ED to be making a value judgement about whether or not the patient in front of them (you) deserves to live? Will you bear the responsibility if they get it wrong?



    .
    Last edited by Hmac; 12-17-17 at 07:34.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveS View Post
    Will you bear the responsibility of all the dopers [for lack of a betterword] future crimes?
    Absurdity. I guess I should only treat nuns.


    I’ll leave this here.
    https://www.ems1.com/ems-products/Am...d-drug-in-EMS/

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1168 View Post
    Absurdity. I guess I should only treat nuns.


    I’ll leave this here.
    https://www.ems1.com/ems-products/Am...d-drug-in-EMS/
    Interesting read, and completely accurate. Granted, the "opioid crisis" is problematic, but what I see these days is the usual overreaction to a problem that's been around for decades and now has become the "disease-of-the-month". As this predictable cycle progresses, I think that Narcan might actually be replacing tourniquets as the must-have accessory for the well-dressed first responder.
    Last edited by Hmac; 12-17-17 at 12:01.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hmac View Post
    Interesting read, and completely accurate. Granted, the "opioid crisis" is problematic, but what I see these days is the usual overreaction to a problem that's been around for decades and now has become the "disease-of-the-month". As this predictable cycle progresses, I think that Narcan might actually be replacing tourniquets as the must-have accessory for the well-dressed first responder.

    I’m with you. I think the opioid crisis is inflated a bit. In some areas, it appears to be a very serious problem, but not really all that new. In my area, opioid OD appears to make up roughly 0.5% of EMS calls in my district. I need to look up some numbers and see how far off I am. I don’t see nearly as many OD’s as the news wants me to believe.

    Two epidemics I see that need to be addressed: obesity, and failure to understand the term “emergency”. I think most people here would agree.

    The well-dressed first responder needs a BVM before naloxone. It is the right hammer for a greater number of nails.

    Heart disease kills more people than heroine.

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