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Thread: Narcan (Naloxone) Training

  1. #21
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    We have a duty to respond and help those in need. It will be someone else's decision long after transport and we have returned to quarters. Do we think that the guy who beat his wife, burned his child, or has abused enough booze and drugs to be a regular frequent flyer deserves less than cordial treatment? Absolutely. But we still have to attend to them.

  2. #22
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    This has gotten to the point that the junkies are fixing in (more) public places, so that if their favorite H is actually carfentanyl, they'll be seen and revived by a person trained to give narcan, or who will call 9-1-1.

    It doesn't fix addiction. Being that close to death does nothing to motivate people to get off opiates. It's provided a free, public funded safety net, and enables/emboldened peo]let to score from sketchy sources. We've backed ourselves into a corner filled with needle exchange programs and overdosing multiple times per day.

    Sound hard? Try seeing it 4x per day for your living, sometimes seeing the same person twice, three times. Some carfentanyl od's are using up 5+ 2 mg doses of barman, so when (not if) this drug goes on backorder, or the machines used to make it are pulled out of service because of particulate matter in the solution... Well, maybe there will be a break, or newfound respect for the consequences of overdose?

    Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveS View Post
    Not to sound mean but letting the dopers go would save lot of taxpayers money in the short and long term.
    For many of us here, that's not possible.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joelski View Post
    This has gotten to the point that the junkies are fixing in (more) public places, so that if their favorite H is actually carfentanyl, they'll be seen and revived by a person trained to give narcan, or who will call 9-1-1.
    A popular place here is across the street from one of our trauma centers.

    Heroin is one thing, the synthetics are next level. Anyone who has watched Drung Inc. can attest to the fact that scientists are not cutting this shit. It's dirty people in dirty places not measuring a f'n thing. Is that capsule Enfamil or Fentanyl? Slam it and we'll see. Add in the high QC Mexican product...no Walter White here.

    All of this is the result of the pain management BS in the early 2000's. The charts with the varying levels of smiley face? Yeah, **** off.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krazykarl View Post
    We have a duty to respond and help those in need. It will be someone else's decision long after transport and we have returned to quarters. Do we think that the guy who beat his wife, burned his child, or has abused enough booze and drugs to be a regular frequent flyer deserves less than cordial treatment? Absolutely. But we still have to attend to them.
    Agree, because ethics. Junkies need to be treated because of a condition that is somewhat optional. They do it to themselves, right? But so do patients with NID diabetes, COPD, kidney failure, heart failure, heart attacks, deconditioning, liver disease, cardiac arrest, and vehicular trauma. Almost all of my patients (at least the ones that truly need a medic) put themselves in their condition, at some level. So, if I could choose to not treat junkies, using the available medical technology and maximum level of professionalism, where does this slippery slope stop?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joelski View Post
    so when (not if) this drug goes on backorder, or the machines used to make it are pulled out of service because of particulate matter in the solution... Well, maybe there will be a break, or newfound respect for the consequences of overdose?

    Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
    Sample Narcan “shortage” algorithm: identify probable opioid OD, BVM and BLS airway maneuvers, collect full vitals and whatever Hx, gain vascular access, place & confirm tube, apply capnography, put ‘em on a vent, transfer to higher level of care, next patient. Easy peasy, LEMON squeezy. Only change from Narcan is ETT and ventIilator. Does naloxone cause better outcomes? Maybe. I’m not super concerned about running out, though.

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