G&R Tactical
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Results 61 to 70 of 70

Thread: Nonsensical Headspace Measurements on 223rem cases...??

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    24,809
    Feedback Score
    14 (100%)
    Use your finger nail if nothing else. Feel for the flick of the ridge on the high/low. It's not much, but believe me... if you don't get it below the max, your gun will not go into battery very well.. if at all.

    And short necks are not a problem. Some FC brass comes REALLY short. Just grow it out by sizing and firing it.
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    287
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)
    Speaking of varying neck lengths, how does that effect neck tension? Does it matter or is neck length inconsequential as compared to neck diameter?

    Also I have a Dillon .223 case gauge and rarely use it. I just went through a pile of fired .223 brass waiting to be resized and they all fit the case gauge. I don't find it gives me much information for setting up my fl sizing die when the unsized cases fit it anyway. I'm a relatively new reloader though so I might be missing something.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Sierra Foothills
    Posts
    14
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by twadsw01 View Post
    I just got a case gauge (Dillon) and am mucking around with some once fired and some prepped cases in it.

    How on earth are y'all telling whether or not the cases are above or below the min/max headspace? It is SO close.

    I can kind of tell, but it is by no means obvious, whether or not the case is in spec or not.

    Also, the case mouth is shorter than the min; is this bad?
    You use a case comparator to measure it. Like Hornadyís lock and load Headspace Comparator. The headspace guage only tells you if the round will fit in the chamber. Wrong tool for the job. The comparator clamps onto your calipers and measures from the datum line (center) of the shoulder.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    325
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by twadsw01 View Post
    I just got a case gauge (Dillon) and am mucking around with some once fired and some prepped cases in it.

    How on earth are y'all telling whether or not the cases are above or below the min/max headspace? It is SO close.

    I can kind of tell, but it is by no means obvious, whether or not the case is in spec or not.

    Also, the case mouth is shorter than the min; is this bad?
    I'm 67 and have chronologically gifted eyesight and I went to the Hornady cartridge case headspace gauge. Because of the larger digital numbers on my vernier calipers are very easy to see.

    Below a fired Lake City 5.56 case in my Hornady gauge and much easier to see, since they do not make braille drop in case gauges.



    The case mouth measurement in drop in case gauges is based off the shoulder location. If you measure OAL case length with vernier calipers you will get a more accurate reading. Meaning forget the small end of the gauge if you do not want to drive yourself nuts.

    The big advantage to the Hornady gauge is you can measure a fired case. And many fired cases will not fit in a drop in case gauge. Meaning with the Hornady gauge you can "SEE" how much you are bumping the case shoulder back during sizing.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    115
    Feedback Score
    4 (100%)
    Got one of those... That's what all the measurements that started this thread came from.

    I'm just wondering what a case gauge, such as the one I have, is used for, and how to read it.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Sierra Foothills
    Posts
    14
    Feedback Score
    0
    [/QUOTE]

    "Prepped": full-length sized, primed, and trimmed to proper case length.
    Mean = 1.465595"
    Median = 1.468"
    Std. Dev. = 0.004535"
    N = 21
    [/QUOTE]

    Donít trim your brass until you are sure you have bumped the shoulder back adequately. I find when I set up the die to bump the shoulder back properly, I rarely if ever need to trim the cases. Iíll do it once maybe for uniformity. Then Iím gtg for the life of the brass.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    115
    Feedback Score
    4 (100%)
    Ok. Sounds good. I'm trimming length based off the shoulder to mouth dimension, versus head to mouth dimension. So it seems like I could potentially get better control over neck tension or how much of the bullet is in the case, doing it the way I do.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    61
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by twadsw01 View Post
    Got one of those... That's what all the measurements that started this thread came from.

    I'm just wondering what a case gauge, such as the one I have, is used for, and how to read it.

    twadsw01,

    I use the Dillon case gauge to set up my sizing die and to quickly verify overall case length. Here is Dillon's video describing proper use of their case gauge to set up a sizing die:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PIO37hANQlY


    Dillon's video does not describe how to use their case gauge to check overall case length. If you do use it to check for OAL, do not push the case up into the gauge. Just insert the case into the gauge and place on a flat surface (primer pocket side facing down). The case's neck's edge should be between the milled section on the other side of the gauge if it is within SAMMI spec. Of course, if you trim shorter or longer (for whatever reason) then it may or may not land within the milled section.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    24,809
    Feedback Score
    14 (100%)
    [QUOTE=dmd08;2590131]Speaking of varying neck lengths, how does that effect neck tension? Does it matter or is neck length inconsequential as compared to neck diameter?[QUOTE]

    longer necks give a greater contact surface with the bullet.... making neck tension more consistent (ideally). There are other issues that can wreck neck tension too however... harder brass, etc.

    Also I have a Dillon .223 case gauge and rarely use it. I just went through a pile of fired .223 brass waiting to be resized and they all fit the case gauge. I don't find it gives me much information for setting up my fl sizing die when the unsized cases fit it anyway. I'm a relatively new reloader though so I might be missing something.
    The gauge is only useful on sized brass... for me anyway.
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    845
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)
    .....
    Last edited by darr3239; 01-26-18 at 11:17.
    "Every step we take towards making the State our Caretaker of our lives, by that much we move toward making the State our Master." Dwight D. Eisenhower

Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •