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Thread: Moving to Canada - teach me about cold weather

  1. #1
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    Moving to Canada - teach me about cold weather

    I applied for and was accepted at one of our subsidiaries in Vancouver. I will have to drive between Van City and Kelowna all year even in winter.

    What do you guys do who live in the deep cold north do for emergency prep in your vehicle and home? Not too worried about Vancouver proper (although thatís a separate issue being urban as hell $650k Condo 550sq ft wtf) as temps never get below -5*C or so.

    Really worried about Kelowna.

    This isnít like ďIím camping in the woods in January in CanadaĒ thread. Itís how to stay safe if Iím stranded at night on the road or while staying at a hotel thereís a damaging winter storm.
    Last edited by Eurodriver; 03-13-18 at 19:46.

  2. #2
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    First, know that you're screwed on guns. Here's something a buddy sent me for the GF that may help you too if you continue shooting-sports involvement up there: https://pastebin.com/Ndb2jSAu

    Other than that, no advice re cold weather, but drop a shout if you expect to be headed down to Seattle--you might be able to borrow iron from somebody if you talk to Renton Fish & Game's Black Rifle League. https://www.northwestfirearms.com/th...e-club.251431/ (Fuddtards, so you're restricted to Klinton Klips.)
    You really have to ask why Conservatives have guns? Because Liberals block freeways, burn cities, throw Molotov cocktails, loot, turn over cop cars, and think this behavior is Socially Acceptable.
    --unknown, memed by user "KeepnitReel" at Northwest Firearms

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  3. #3
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    Planning on staying or just change of scenery?

    While I am not up in Canada, I am up in PA and well, weather can get sporting up here. I'm also currently running 70 miles each way to work so getting stranded has crossed my mind because depending where I would be looking at being in an area without a lot of options for shelter. Been carrying basically a full change of clothes and layers, insulated boots that I can actually walk in, spare socks, blankets, emergency as well as like a heavy quilt. Food stuffs, figure whatever water you have in the vehicle is going to freeze if you are not carrying it in an out, fire starting stuff, because why not, lights, batteries, extra charger for phone, I really need to pick up a power cell or something just because. I mean, I figure worse case for me would be getting stuck on or alongside the road or a backroad overnight in the truck. So I plan for having to basically camp out of that bitch. I don't plan on actually hiking into the woods and going all survivor man. As such, I'd almost say some blankets, and a change of clothes that is weather appropriate would cover you if you were smart about that and having some emergency gear handy.

    I'd also ask the locals to see what they feel that need. Also, I will say this, unlike say the deep south up here and I imagine Canada too, actually knows how to treat the roads for snow. So six inches or more of snow isn't the concern that it would be down in Miami.
    "I don't collect guns anymore, I stockpile weapons for ****ing war." Chuck P.

    "Some days you eat the bacon, and other days the bacon eats you." SeriousStudent

    "Don't complain when after killing scores of women and children in a mall, a group of well armed men who train to shoot people like you in the face show up to say hello." WillBrink

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    Also, start watching Highway Thru Hell on the Weather Channel. That'll show ya some of the road hazards up in the mountains...

    For the electronics:
    --Spare battery for phone, possibly two--consider a satellite phone if budget allows; good idea to keep a spare battery or external power pack anyway no matter where you are
    --Solar-powered phone charger ($40 at Harbor Freight)
    You really have to ask why Conservatives have guns? Because Liberals block freeways, burn cities, throw Molotov cocktails, loot, turn over cop cars, and think this behavior is Socially Acceptable.
    --unknown, memed by user "KeepnitReel" at Northwest Firearms

    NRA Life Member (installment plan)

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    Well at least you're on the west side of the Rockies, Kelowna is in the Okanagan valley which is really quite nice, great wines, if you like wine. BC is expensive, NDP GOV. I know that on the prairies they get temps in the -30's, with wind chill in the -40's, that said BC in known to have a much milder climate. Depending on your route I would pack the car accordingly? If you haven't been to BC before make sure to check out Banff, beautiful national park. Shoot me a PM for specifics? BTW how long is the assignment? Cheers
    Last edited by mildot; 03-13-18 at 20:43.

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    Thanks for all of the advice guys. It's a lot to process. I'm not sure I'll need a firearm, except maybe a hunting rifle. The country feels totally unlike anything experienced in the USA.

    Quote Originally Posted by mildot View Post
    Well at least you're on the west side of the Rockies, Kelowna is in the Okanagan valley which is really quite nice, great wines, if you like wine. BC is expensive, NDP GOV. I know that on the prairies they get temps in the -30's, with wind chill in the -40's, that said BC in known to have a much milder climate. Depending on your route I would pack the car accordingly? If you haven't been to BC before make sure to check out Banff, beautiful national park. Shoot me a PM for specifics? BTW how long is the assignment? Cheers
    I expect to become a Canadian citizen and live here permanently. NDP is doing a lot of good things in BC from what I've seen. I hope they get the housing crisis under control (aka Chinese Money Laundering).

    Not worried about southern BC but the drive into Kelowna is what scares me in January if necessary. That's seriously cold temps.
    Why do the loudest do the least?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eurodriver View Post
    Thanks for all of the advice guys. It's a lot to process. I'm not sure I'll need a firearm, except maybe a hunting rifle. The country feels totally unlike anything experienced in the USA.



    I expect to become a Canadian citizen and live here permanently. NDP is doing a lot of good things in BC from what I've seen. I hope they get the housing crisis under control (aka Chinese Money Laundering).

    Not worried about southern BC but the drive into Kelowna is what scares me in January if necessary. That's seriously cold temps.
    Well I guess that's really all about your politics? BC has one of the highest cost of living in the country, the GOV run car insurance is due for a big increase, they are bringing a home "speculation" tax which will impact alot of folks who have 2 homes? (ie) retirees. I guess it's all about what lens you look through, good luck,
    Last edited by mildot; 03-14-18 at 07:18.

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    One of my Teams is in Calgary and I've we've travelled to Vancouver and spent time traveling the mountains in between Banff and BC side. Based on your post you now also understand that B.C. stands for "Bring Cash" more than British Columbia.

    Depending upon time of the year, wet weather, shoes/boots, jacket are a staple item . Think wet, damp and cold as opposed to the Eastern side of the CDN Rockies which is a more dry air like CO, NV, UT. Also depending on how far outside of town you regularly travel will determine auxiliary gear, and its specific climate rating.

    For the obvious Cold season, depending upon where your travel habits it could vary on climate and the low temps:

    - Wool or synthetics for undergarments
    - Extra Wool socks - weight dependent upon season
    - Anti-Slip crampons( I forget the brands), but think more civilian rubber stretch to put on with any type of footwear for anti-slip even when walking around town during ice/snow storms - easily carry in a business back or jacket pocket.
    - Heavy duty work glove, for cold-season, glove liners and heavier shell as a precaution
    - handwarmers, firestarting material (outside of city limits, more rural mtns.
    - a way to jump start whatever the largest amp requirement vehicle you might drive
    - Softshell jacket, wool or synthetic undergarments insulated (think more modern long johns), parka type shell, watch cap, beanie and/or muffs, insulated face mask
    - Emergency blanket, heavier if going to the mountains.
    - backup means of power for emergency comms.

    Ultimately base your seasonal requirements like you are in Southern Alaska, and where you are most likely to go and adjust for special trips outside of your normal travel activities.

    Kelowna is a relatively mild climate, in line with Southen Alberta. The higher elevation will be a more temperate climate/drier that Vancouver, more like Calgary or Southern Alberta. You have to be prepared for the worst low temps of around -28- 30 F on average. In that area, Snowshoes could come in handy depending upon circumstances and time of the year. It could be much worse if you were around areas significantly further North like Jackfish in the Yukon area which requires arctic level gear and extreme lows sometimes lower than -60F.


    ETA: some other basics - Chapstick/ lip balm, sunscreen and sunglasses/eye pro.
    Last edited by jethroUSMC; 03-14-18 at 08:23.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eurodriver View Post
    Thanks for all of the advice guys. It's a lot to process. I'm not sure I'll need a firearm, except maybe a hunting rifle. The country feels totally unlike anything experienced in the USA.



    I expect to become a Canadian citizen and live here permanently. NDP is doing a lot of good things in BC from what I've seen. I hope they get the housing crisis under control (aka Chinese Money Laundering).

    Not worried about southern BC but the drive into Kelowna is what scares me in January if necessary. That's seriously cold temps.
    Your body with somewhat adjust/acclimate to those temps if you spend enough time out in them, but that doesn't negate the need for gear for extended periods of time in those temps.

    Definitely beautiful areas in B.C. and Alberta. Be prepared for more sticker shock on pricing, and currency valuation vs. what you have been used to, and of course CDN laws and government. But cool places for sure. A lot of outdoor activities is one of my favorite things about B.C. and Alberta - oh and there are some gorgeous women up there.
    Last edited by jethroUSMC; 03-14-18 at 08:31.

  10. #10
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    It's cold...

    /The End.

    Chiming in from Minnesnowta.

    Bundle up, it'll take yah a couple years to acclimate, but eventually it won't bother you. You'll turn into the same soul-less north monsters we are once that -25 degree air hits you right in the Canuks and your lungs start to scream and shrivel in agony.

    Than, it all stops. You've either died, or the cold just isn't so bad once you're out in it. Sometimes it's hard to tell. The touch test will be a no-go, as your extremities will probably be numb; false signs of death have been encountered in these instances.

    Best way to know current vital status: Go back inside, where the rushing warm blood back to any place that got cold makes that body part feel ready to fall off. It'll burn worse than the Super-Clap from the Philippines as your nerves try to fight their way through the water boarding they're going through.

    Than, it's just a rinse and repeat type business for abooouuuut.... 4-6 months.

    You'll do fine.

    In all seriousness, I couldn't have provided better "for-realz" input than what's been provided. Even in Minnesota, I follow a lot of the advice provided to avoid our cold winters getting stuck in a bank and not being able to be seen for hours.
    Last edited by HeruMew; 03-14-18 at 08:55.

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