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Thread: Investors issues demands to Ruger ..

  1. #11
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    I haven't owned a Ruger, since the P-91 I bought NEW in '91, but it sounds like they POLITELY told the dunderninnies, to go pound sand.
    - Either you're part of the problem or you're part of the solution or you're just part of the landscape - Sam (Robert DeNiro) in, "Ronin" -

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_War_Wagon View Post
    I haven't owned a Ruger, since the P-91 I bought NEW in '91, but it sounds like they POLITELY told the dunderninnies, to go pound sand.
    I never bought one in spite of bills comments even after all these years ( I was 11 when the AWB was enacted.) People have been saying with Bill gone the company doesn't believe that anymore. Looks like that holds true. I'll see how this shakes out and finally pick one of the few up I've had my eye on.
    I must study politics and war, that our sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. - John Adams

    The AK guys are all about the reach around. - Garand Thumb.

  3. #13
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    You know, I think I might just have to buy a Ruger 10/22 after that statement... just because...
    ,'';=====-
    !
    One is just never enough...

  4. #14
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    Glad I bought that little EC9s a couple of weeks ago...old Bill’s day had come and gone, and after him there was some doubt that the company could get its act together again. Now they’re almost TOO innovative!

    I refuse to buy ugly guns, which they have in abundance—but they sure are busy out there in the Ruger Archepelago. Anyway, they told those folks to go pound sand in the nicest possible way. Good.
    Mala striga deleta est. (The wicked witch is finished.)

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam View Post
    Ed is right.

    This is Ruger's response:

    Ruger's official response (posted 5/9/2018 to their Facebook page): Please understand that Ruger was obligated by applicable law to include a shreholder's activist resolution with its proxy materials for a shareholder vote. With its passage, the proposal requires Ruger to prepare a report. That's it. A report. What the proposal does not do . . . and cannot do . . . is force us to change our business, which is lawful and constitutionally protected. What it does not do . . . and cannot do . . . is force us to adopt misguided principles created by groups who do not own guns, know nothing about our business, and frankly would rather see us out of business. As our CEO explained, "we are Americans who work together to produce rugged, reliable, innovative and affordable firearms for responsible citizens. We are staunch supporters of the Second Amendment not because we make firearms, but because we cherish the rights conferred by it. We understand the importance of those rights and, as importantly, recognize that allowing our constitutionally protected freedoms to be eroded for the sake of political expediency is the wrong approach for our Company, for our industry, for our customers, and for our country. We are arms makers for responsible citizens and I want to assure our long-term shareholders and loyal customers that we have no intention of changing that."
    Anyone can buy shares of a company's publicly traded stock, which makes them a shareholder, and use that as a means to insert things on their annual ballot that shareholders get to vote on. As a shareholder, you have the right to do that. I am not sure of the exact step by step mechanics of it, but it is done all the time. I am surprised that it isn't done more.

    I might just buy a share of McDonalds and insert a proposal on their ballot that they replace that stupid clown Ronald McDonald as the corporate icon with Sid Vicious of the punk rock group The Sex Pistols.

  6. #16
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    Many corporations you have to have a certain % of shares to be able to raise issues/proposals. Some allow investor questions via open mic, but are often vetted/screened ahead of time.

  7. #17
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    Ironic given how Bill Ruger almost ran the company into the ground with the same views. Sounds like Ruger needs different investors.
    It's hard to be a ACLU hating, philosophically Libertarian, socially liberal, fiscally conservative, scientifically grounded, agnostic, porn admiring gun owner who believes in self determination.

    Chuck, we miss ya man.

    كافر

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Glockster View Post
    Nailed it. Once an appeaser, always an appeaser.
    Huh?

    They have been telling these anti-gunners to pound sand for decades now. Just look at their products, Silencers, Assault Weapons, HiCap magazines, etc.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed L. View Post
    Anyone can buy shares of a company's publicly traded stock, which makes them a shareholder, and use that as a means to insert things on their annual ballot that shareholders get to vote on. As a shareholder, you have the right to do that. I am not sure of the exact step by step mechanics of it, but it is done all the time. I am surprised that it isn't done more.
    Exactly. Long time investors all know of the antics Evelyn Davis did as an GE/ATT shareholder.

    The Evelyn Y. Davis Stockholder Activist Model involved buying 5-10 shares of stock in a corporation and dominating annual stockholder meetings by hurling insults at CEOs, wearing outrageous costumes, making sexually suggestive comments and proposals ranging from requiring CEOs seek psychiatric treatment to placing actress Koo Stark on a corporate Board.

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