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Thread: Enter the Dragon

  1. #1
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    Enter the Dragon

    Transferring this for a buddy of mine, it's a Chinese Type 79 Dragunov, imported as a NDM 86.

    Basically, an exact copy of the Soviet SVD Dragunov designated marksman rifle, with the exception of the scope.

    The Soviets sold several hundred to the Chinese in the late 70's.

    Despite the hype, these things really are more of a DMR type than a true sniper system in the Western tradition.

    These would be issued at least one per platoon, sometimes one per squad, to give the Soviet troopers the ability to reach out past the effective range of their AK's.

























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  2. #2
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    Do want. Anyone who doesn't think semi auto rifles can have beautiful lines should see this.

  3. #3
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    They are about as "elegant" a rifle as ever came out of the Eastern Bloc.

    Interesting melding of Kalashnikov and Tokarev rifle designs, with a lot of original design work done by Dragunov himself.

    The bolt rotates and is dual lugged like an AK, but the adjustable gas system is a tappet design like a Tokarev vs. the long stroke of the Kalashnikov. The magazine system is an almost direct copy of the Tokarev SVT-40.

    These are milled steel receiver rifles, very well executed.

    Chambered in the original 7.62x54mmR, although the Chinese did export some of these in .308 Win. to the US.

    With standard light ball loads, you can expect this to shoot about like a standard M14 or FAL (4"-5" @ 100m), with the special Russian sniper grade ammo, designated 7N1, you can generally halve that.


    My pics really don't do it justice, it's a handsome rifle, not bad considering it was made in 1985.
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  4. #4
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    Great looking rifle! Thanks for sharing those pictures

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    Templar was is the lever used for that is situtated just behind the saftey lever.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by k_cheerangie View Post
    Templar was is the lever used for that is situtated just behind the saftey lever.
    That's the take down lever that holds the dust cover on.
    Employee of colonialshooting.com

  7. #7
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    How much would one of these go for? I saw a used Russian made model last July that was 850 dollars. Curious about the current price as it is a nice rifle.

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    I wish I was right eye dominant

  9. #9
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    My buddy Xavier and I hit the range today and got a little trigger time on the SVD.

    With Russian surplus light ball from the late 60's it held very, very respectable groups, and recoil was about on par with a standard weight M14.













    Last edited by TOrrock; 07-26-10 at 22:02.
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  10. #10
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    Field stripping the SVD Dragunov DMR:



























    Last edited by TOrrock; 09-27-09 at 15:33.
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