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Thread: Duracoat University

  1. #1
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    Duracoat University

    Hey guys

    I was wondering if anyone here has gone through the Duracoat class. My unit's home station is about 45 minutes away from Lauer's and on my way home so...
    how many days are the classes? Are they worth the time/money? Any info would be much appreciated.
    Thanks!

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    What ever you do, do not buy their instructional DVD; absolutely worthless.

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    What's your plans? I have been spraying it for a long time, And did not take the class. I did a lot of guns for a rep comp. lots of green and tan. Just be sure to bake it and let it set for 24 hours , And you should be good to go.

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    As I understand as long as you can use an rattle can nicely you can duracoat just fine as well. The only 'sticky' part is doing a proper prep.(as i understand)
    Second Amendment Absolutist!

    "Speed costs money, How fast do you want to go?"
    -seen on a speed shop in Michigan

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    Well the plan would be to offer it as another "product" at the store where I work. We have an excellent gunsmith, but the only finish work I've seen him do is blueing. So it would just be another option.

    I've used Duracoat on my 870 and a Glock already. I love the product. I'm just curious if its worth going to the class to get a certification or not. I emailed the company and they said its a one day course so it would be pretty handy that way.

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    Duracoat University is not Camoflauge S.O.H.N.

    School of Hard Knocks

    NIC Industries AKA: Cerra Coat also offers a class which I inquired about this past winter since it's right down the street. The class mainly concentrates on the prep and mechanics of application to prevent 'process' failures. Since I do protective coatings for a living I just need to downsize my equipment alittle.

    I went with the Cerra Coat H series (Forced Cure 250-300 deg 2 hrs to 45 min respectively) over Duracoat because of the faster cure and better durability on my AK and G3 builds. They also offer an ambient cure C series (5 day) that can take 1200 degree heat cycles and a couple that can take 1600 or better. According to the rep, the ambient cure can be forced alittle but I don't have my notes handy.

    They will teach you the application instructions step by step, equipment selection/set up for optimal performance, cleaning, abraisive blasting, QC guidelines, mixing/thinning procedures, the use/maintenance of spray gun airbrushes, and curing. They probably will give you some guidance as to stencils ect but I have seen no real books on the nuts and bolts of the application processes and techniques of camo besides an old Army FM.

    You didn't specify if you were planning on offerring it as camo, I just assume.

    The art of camo is a learned/hands on task that would take a week or more to teach with multipule P.E's. I think there is a guy on TOS that does alot of duracoating in his home shop and has posted quite abit about it. For technique, I would search gun boards and look at folks finished work and talk to them about how they did it.

    Since you have to blast the surface as part of the surface prep you could also parkerize prior to coating. Parking isn't hard and would offer 'another' product and added surface protection.

    As far as 'Offering it as a product', I would keep to the basics at first, i.e. slide one color and the frame another. That is where I'm at and will most likely stay with the cerra coat. To be competitive in the camoflauge market you'll have to meet or beat the camo competition. I would practice technique on old stocks ect and if they turned out good could be kept for ref/display.
    Last edited by Ttwwaack; 08-08-09 at 23:27. Reason: Tuckered Out

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    Excellent advice. Thank you!

    I still have to talk it over with the boss and our smith, but I think it would be a good idea to have something like this available to our customers.

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    I sprayed countless # of guns for CMMG when I worked for them. The trick is in the prep. Good luck

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    Quote Originally Posted by Remember911 View Post
    I sprayed countless # of guns for CMMG when I worked for them. The trick is in the prep. Good luck

    Good point. My buddy flew up to WI for the Duracoat class by Lauer a few years ago. He does it now as a "paying hobby"!

    He stressed the importance of prep for a successful application. I've had a number of guns done by him and Duracoat---if properly applied---looks great. It can also be fingerf****d and no worries about corrosion. Hell, take it out in a rainstorm. Will it scratch? Yep, but so will *most* finishes.
    11C2P '83-'87
    Airborne Infantry

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    I used the search button and ran across this thread.

    What is the best way to PREP a lower/receiver extension for a home Duracoat Job?

    What type of scuff should I do to the parts? Scotch brite and dry it with accetone or something? Trying to do a decent job the first time.

    Also, on baking the finish on, do you let it tack up or dry a bit on its own then bake it, or bake it extremely wet? Also, I have heard a bunch of info on different temps and cure times.

    Any extra info would be awesome!

    Thanks in advance
    Shane

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    I've been playing with Duracoat for a while now and found that surface prep is the most important step in the process. Duracoat loves to stick to parkerized and oxide finishes. I've been doing a light sanding with 600 grit sandpaper followed by a thorough wipe down with acetone or MEK. I use compressed air to completely dry the part. If you are refinishing a pre-painted, chromed or previously coated part I recommend media blasting rather than sanding to get a good surface to stick to. After the cleaning process it's important not to touch the part with your bare hands as this can transfer skin oils back onto the part. Unless you are using Durabake, Duracoat is air dry so no oven is required. I've had very good luck with Duracoat and Duraheat, both are air dry products. Have fun!!
    Marty
    "Indecision is the key to flexibility"

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    Thanks for the tips! So I am looking at doing my spikes stripped lower, my Vltor Receiver Extension, ASAP Plate, Castle nut and a BAD lever...

    Since these parts have a factory finish on them, do you suggest blasting them, or a light sand/scuff job on them would be okay?

    Thanks again
    Shane

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    You should be good to go with just a light sanding. Be sure to clean the parts off very well afterwards and use rubber gloves when handling the parts after cleaning them.
    "Indecision is the key to flexibility"

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    Will do, thanks again for your tips and suggestions! I have painted tons of parts before, just not gun parts. lol

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    They are basically the same except that the assembled gun parts end up as a much more satisfying product. Have fun with the coating!
    Marty
    "Indecision is the key to flexibility"

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    One last questions, would you wet sand the parts or do it dry? Thanks

  17. #17
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    I always dry sand followed by a thorough cleaning with acetone or MEK. No need for wet sanding. It just makes it harder to see what has already been sanded and also gets liquid into places that make it more difficult to dry the part.
    "Indecision is the key to flexibility"

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    Gotcha, I'm going to start sanding and preping my parts tonight. I have to get a few more parts before I acutally do the duracoating. Still need a BAD Lever, and the LPK so I can duracoat the saftey selector....

  19. #19
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    I'm not sure what color(s) you plan to use but you might consider leaving the selector switch, trigger, bolt release paddle, pins and BAD lever black. The contrast (at least on a tan upper and lower) looks really nice.
    "Indecision is the key to flexibility"

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    I have thought that as well, but was concderned it wouldn't look right. I might take your advise on that one.

    Would you duracoat the ASAP plate and castle nut though? I'm using Daniel Defense Flat Dark so it will contrast with all the Magpul FDE furniture i'm going to use....

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