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Thread: Vision correction surgery - DON'T

  1. #41
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    This is a surgery that was probably successful:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQzi5cG6cgU&feature=fvst

    This one is very botched, a royal F-up, see how bad the flap looks:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XL01H...eature=related


    An animation of how intralase works:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpYlZ...eature=related

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryan View Post

    The ability to wake up at night not reaching for glasses or with contacts stuck to my eyes is priceless.
    That is one of the big reasons I am considering, that and contacts are irritating and glasses while motorcycling or snowboarding is a huge PITA, not to mention I shoot much better with contacts.

    Quote Originally Posted by ryan View Post
    It was the best grand I have ever spent.
    damn, I am looking at 3-4k

  3. #43
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    I never understood peoples aversion to corrective lenses, or glasses for that matter. Honestly i am MUCH more comfortable with my glasses than contacts. I also love the added safety of the polycarbonate lenses. There are many stylish frames out there, and I have been looking into perhaps getting some prescription transition Oakleys for shooting, and doing yardwork or other activities where safety glasses are needed.
    Last edited by turdbocharged; 10-21-11 at 14:46.

  4. #44
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    Consumer Reports, reported the results of some LASIK follow-up surveys in their August 2009 edition:

    http://lasikcomplications.com/consumerreports.htm

    Survey finds 53% of laser eye surgery patients experience at least one side effect and 22% still have problems six months after surgery.

    This is the kind of stuff causes me some hesitation. Consumer Reports is not perfect but they are also not a BS, alarmist outfit. There is a LOT of money being made on LASIK procedures, which after all take the doctors just minutes to do, so there's a big incentive to push the procedures and to cover up complications in the results.

  5. #45
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    I had LASIK in 2001 through TLC Laser Eye Centers. I did not have any significant problems and still do not. I do have dry eyes. During allergy season I need moistening drops. Also during the winters in Ohio the defroster would sometimes cause me some discomfort after long hours in the car. Nothing the drops didn't help. Halo's are not any worse than I experienced with contact lenses or glasses. I was something like 20/800 before surgery. I am now 20/20 uncorrected. Having worn glasses since the 2nd grade I can tell you that it was worth the pain and the occassional dry eyes. Several guys from my Agency got it done around the same time as I did. Those of us that went to TLC had no issues. The guy that went to "Bob's Discount House of Eyes" had all kinds of problems and did for years. I was in LE the whole time and had been in several car accidents, many fights, pepper sprayed numerous times and even struck by a car going 35mph. Still no issues. YMMV.


    ETA - Baby fingernails are very small and thin, like little razor blades. They are usually very sharp.
    Last edited by Hizzie; 10-23-11 at 09:48.

  6. #46
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    Step back and stop being so emotional. You're letting the fact that your wife was hurt cloud your brain.

    An answer of "I don't know" doesn't mean anything. It could be because there is no way to know, whether you're a PA, an MD, or a Dr. of Optometry.

    A small finger and fingernail jabbing hard in the eye can cause damage regardless of what was or was not done prior.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by maximus83 View Post
    Consumer Reports, reported the results of some LASIK follow-up surveys in their August 2009 edition:

    http://lasikcomplications.com/consumerreports.htm

    Survey finds 53% of laser eye surgery patients experience at least one side effect and 22% still have problems six months after surgery.

    This is the kind of stuff causes me some hesitation. Consumer Reports is not perfect but they are also not a BS, alarmist outfit. There is a LOT of money being made on LASIK procedures, which after all take the doctors just minutes to do, so there's a big incentive to push the procedures and to cover up complications in the results.
    I'm probably among the 22% that still had complications 6 months after surgery.

    I weighed PRK vs Lasik for a while and eventually chose Lasik.

    My eyes weren't the best candidates in the world for Lasik. It would be a one time deal, the corrective area was thin for the size. They would max out the range of the machine and I had just enough material for one correction (no return trip for me) and a bit of buffer. But my eyes were very stable and otherwise healthy, and I had some recent life events that made me realize the liability of corrective lenses.

    My problems were helos, staring, dryness, and some contrast issues well after surgery. It is good to note here that I experienced helos and staring *prior* to surgery as well, and they got worse for a time.

    I'm now 4 years later and the dryness only comes during seasonal changes, right along with my characteristic dehydration from the same seasonal changes. It's only a few days to a week, not a big deal. I don't need drops, just a few extra blinks.

    The helos are gone completely now. Net gain.

    The staring only appear during a few specific points of *perfect* contrast lighting at dusk. I've only experienced it a couple of times this year. I could call this a net gain from where I was.

    Contrast loss remains, but it is so slight now I really have to pay very close attention to notice.

    It took me a little more time than most, but I still have excellent vision and I would do it again. I did my homework and bought the services of the best doctor I could find in my area, and try to take really good care of my eyes.

    So while those numbers look unfavorable, the "side effects" really need to be quantified... I was happy after 3-6 months even with the helos, staring, etc, they were worse than before but I had already lived with them for years. I know many patients also lose their corrections due to lifestyle, too much time in front of the computer or books without breaks or relief. I use +.25 reading glasses for extensive up close work for that reason.

  8. #48
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    I never thought about this before.

    I had cataract surgery on both eyes where the lenses were replaced...does this type of corrective surgery fall under the same "warning" regarding a reduction in the structural strength of the eye...the opthamologist never mentioned it?

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by xwray View Post
    I never thought about this before.

    I had cataract surgery on both eyes where the lenses were replaced...does this type of corrective surgery fall under the same "warning" regarding a reduction in the structural strength of the eye...the opthamologist never mentioned it?
    No, during a refractive lensectomy or a standard cataract surgery, if that is what you had, several thin incisions are made in the cornea to remove the lens and to implant the IOL (intraocular lens).

    The procedure, done correctly, does not remove or thin out corneal tissue like LASIK. The vision correction is done by implanting an IOL of sufficient power to correct the vision, unlike LASIK/PRK where a re-shaping of the corneal contour takes place.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by uwe1 View Post
    No, during a refractive lensectomy or a standard cataract surgery, if that is what you had, several thin incisions are made in the cornea to remove the lens and to implant the IOL (intraocular lens).

    The procedure, done correctly, does not remove or thin out corneal tissue like LASIK. The vision correction is done by implanting an IOL of sufficient power to correct the vision, unlike LASIK/PRK where a re-shaping of the corneal contour takes place.
    Glad to hear that, thanks. I do have a "caution" though, for anyyone who will have a similar procedure. I was given the option of selecting what type of correction I wanted - both eyes corrected for distant vision, both for near, or one of each. I told them I preferred both distant but was talked into correcting one eye for near and the other for distant. Big Mistake in my case which may or may not be unique. It turns out that one eye tended to act like a "lazy eye" that I had never noticed except when I was on the computer where I would experience a situation of having to frequently force a refocus of the screen because one eye had eased into a dominant role without me even realizing it until I forced the refocus. This was no big deal and I had pretty much learned to live with it.

    When the lenses of differing power were inserted it aggravated the lazy eye condition and now it is really bothersome because the eyes have a strong tendancy to focus in diferent areas such that I am not experiencing true binocular vision when it occurs and I have to manually snap them into focusing on the same area. I'm not talking about focusing sharply but focusing on the same exact area, one eye focused sharply and the other somewhat out of focus like a nearsighted condition - that description may not make sense unless you have experienced it.

    It was several months before the condition manifested itself and I complained about it to the doctor at one of the checkups. That's when he discovered the lazy eye tendancy and wound up sending me to a specialist in that area. To make a long story short we tried a non-surgical method of correction which would we could not get to work properly and being 73 years old I did not want to go through a surgical procedure that may or may not have worked. I'm just happy I don't need to wear strong corrective lenses any longer and I can live with the problem.

    Take care of your eyes!

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