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Thread: treating battlefield wounds with Sugar/Honey

  1. #1
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    treating battlefield wounds with Sugar/Honey

    Brother just send me these two links and I think they are both useful as we all have sugar and probably honey in our house.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_5693114_trea...nds-sugar.html

    http://www.ehow.com/how_5689579_use-...at-wounds.html
    "If you love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsel nor your arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that you were our countrymen"

    -Samuel Adams, 1776

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    Quote Originally Posted by murphman View Post
    Brother just send me these two links and I think they are both useful as we all have sugar and probably honey in our house.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_5693114_trea...nds-sugar.html

    http://www.ehow.com/how_5689579_use-...at-wounds.html
    Sugar effort it concern in different ways. It is normally aseptic constrain the progress of microorganisms. It absorb up humidity and thus assist decrease the swelling general to injured tissue. Sugar may also offer the vittles or boost for tissue to invigorate.
    Different general safety signs in a workplace you get it from supplylinedirect

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    I've heard of both, but never tried either.

    However, from experience, I'd avoid granular objects - sugar, pepper, etc. It can be a real PITA to get off the wound once you're at the hospital. No, it doens't just rinse off - you get it in the congealed blood, which then has to be removed to see the wound. And then they have to get out all the pieces of stuff that you shoved onto the wound. Typically before the lidocaine goes in.

    No real-life experiences on the treating end with honey.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Caduceus View Post
    I've heard of both, but never tried either.

    However, from experience, I'd avoid granular objects - sugar, pepper, etc. It can be a real PITA to get off the wound once you're at the hospital. No, it doens't just rinse off - you get it in the congealed blood, which then has to be removed to see the wound. And then they have to get out all the pieces of stuff that you shoved onto the wound. Typically before the lidocaine goes in.

    No real-life experiences on the treating end with honey.
    I would use neither. We have people come to the ER from time to time with all sorts of home remedies smeared on their wounds. Ultimately it just makes the wound harder to clean and repair. Clean, and bandaged wound. Keep other crap out of it.

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    I think the application is for remote, field expedient use, and not as a default protocol. Thus, is honey (with its history of use) any better than doing nothing other than irrigation?
    ParadigmSRP.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Iraq Ninja View Post
    I think the application is for remote, field expedient use, and not as a default protocol. Thus, is honey (with its history of use) any better than doing nothing other than irrigation?
    I would suggest no. I do not like the idea of putting a sugary organic material in a wound that is most likely laden with bacteria. That is just a setup for trouble.
    Last edited by jknopp44; 06-14-12 at 17:34.

  7. #7
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    Here ya go...here's another similarly scholarly review of something you should keep in mind for, you know, when the SHTF and it's EOTWAWKI, and your bunker mate has a gallbladder attack.

    http://www.gallbladderattack.com/coffeeenema.shtml




    Good lord

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