Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 54

Thread: treating battlefield wounds with Sugar/Honey

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    323
    Feedback Score
    0

    treating battlefield wounds with Sugar/Honey

    Brother just send me these two links and I think they are both useful as we all have sugar and probably honey in our house.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_5693114_trea...nds-sugar.html

    http://www.ehow.com/how_5689579_use-...at-wounds.html
    "If you love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsel nor your arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that you were our countrymen"

    -Samuel Adams, 1776

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    India
    Posts
    8
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by murphman View Post
    Brother just send me these two links and I think they are both useful as we all have sugar and probably honey in our house.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_5693114_trea...nds-sugar.html

    http://www.ehow.com/how_5689579_use-...at-wounds.html
    Sugar effort it concern in different ways. It is normally aseptic constrain the progress of microorganisms. It absorb up humidity and thus assist decrease the swelling general to injured tissue. Sugar may also offer the vittles or boost for tissue to invigorate.
    Different general safety signs in a workplace you get it from supplylinedirect

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    627
    Feedback Score
    8 (100%)
    I've heard of both, but never tried either.

    However, from experience, I'd avoid granular objects - sugar, pepper, etc. It can be a real PITA to get off the wound once you're at the hospital. No, it doens't just rinse off - you get it in the congealed blood, which then has to be removed to see the wound. And then they have to get out all the pieces of stuff that you shoved onto the wound. Typically before the lidocaine goes in.

    No real-life experiences on the treating end with honey.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    104
    Feedback Score
    4 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Caduceus View Post
    I've heard of both, but never tried either.

    However, from experience, I'd avoid granular objects - sugar, pepper, etc. It can be a real PITA to get off the wound once you're at the hospital. No, it doens't just rinse off - you get it in the congealed blood, which then has to be removed to see the wound. And then they have to get out all the pieces of stuff that you shoved onto the wound. Typically before the lidocaine goes in.

    No real-life experiences on the treating end with honey.
    I would use neither. We have people come to the ER from time to time with all sorts of home remedies smeared on their wounds. Ultimately it just makes the wound harder to clean and repair. Clean, and bandaged wound. Keep other crap out of it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,560
    Feedback Score
    1 (100%)
    I think the application is for remote, field expedient use, and not as a default protocol. Thus, is honey (with its history of use) any better than doing nothing other than irrigation?
    ParadigmSRP.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    104
    Feedback Score
    4 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Iraq Ninja View Post
    I think the application is for remote, field expedient use, and not as a default protocol. Thus, is honey (with its history of use) any better than doing nothing other than irrigation?
    I would suggest no. I do not like the idea of putting a sugary organic material in a wound that is most likely laden with bacteria. That is just a setup for trouble.
    Last edited by jknopp44; 06-14-12 at 16:34.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    4,787
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)
    Here ya go...here's another similarly scholarly review of something you should keep in mind for, you know, when the SHTF and it's EOTWAWKI, and your bunker mate has a gallbladder attack.

    http://www.gallbladderattack.com/coffeeenema.shtml




    Good lord

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    1,131
    Feedback Score
    8 (100%)
    Sugar will help to coagulate.. You must control bleeding to survive.. Just saying.. Ron
    Ain't no pockets on a shroud..

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Santos/Brazil
    Posts
    218
    Feedback Score
    1 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Kokopelli View Post
    Sugar will help to coagulate.. You must control bleeding to survive.. Just saying.. Ron
    Yes, I've heard the same.

    Regarding the fear of giving sugar to bacteria, I am not sure. There is one school of thought that goes: excess sugar is used to preserve fruit, because in high concentrations, sugar makes for a hostile environment for bacteria...

    I'd like to see any scientific evidence...
    Paulo Marcondes -- Campinas, Brazil.
    Quote Originally Posted by MistWolf View Post
    If we could control all the variables, we'd just put all the bad luck on our enemies and stay home

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    1,131
    Feedback Score
    8 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by pmarc View Post
    Yes, I've heard the same.

    Regarding the fear of giving sugar to bacteria, I am not sure. There is one school of thought that goes: excess sugar is used to preserve fruit, because in high concentrations, sugar makes for a hostile environment for bacteria...

    I'd like to see any scientific evidence...
    Pub Med is a good source.. Ron
    Ain't no pockets on a shroud..

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    US
    Posts
    2,683
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)
    Thanks for sharing
    "Intelligence is not the ability to regurgitate information. It is the ability to make sound decisions on a consistent basis "--me

    "Just remember, when you are talking to the average person, you are talking to a television set"--RDJB

    One Big Ass Mistake America

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    104
    Feedback Score
    4 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by pmarc View Post
    Yes, I've heard the same.

    Regarding the fear of giving sugar to bacteria, I am not sure. There is one school of thought that goes: excess sugar is used to preserve fruit, because in high concentrations, sugar makes for a hostile environment for bacteria...

    I'd like to see any scientific evidence...
    Yea I am not saying its a definite no go, just not 100% sold on the idea. The anti-coagulate properties would be a bonus, though I have never seen it put to the test. I will do some research myself. Maybe I will be surprised. I am always open for new ideas/treatments. Found a recent journal article on the issue.

    http://journals.lww.com/aswcjournal/...Update.11.aspx
    Last edited by jknopp44; 06-14-12 at 20:11.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Always in the mountains.
    Posts
    299
    Feedback Score
    0
    Coming from my experience working in the microbiology field, and my training as a first responder, I would suggest going and getting the proper equipment if you want to be prepared. Novelty is great, but when the established options are better...use them.

    As far as increasing bacterial growth? I wouldn't be too concerned with that. Honey has anti-bacterial properties, and an overload of sugar does, too. Again though, this is not something that I would think of as a "primary" tool to treat anything.

    Personally, I typically avoid eHow, as it seems to be full of morons offering unsound advice. Articles like that convince people not to buy things they should have on hand in favor of something that would have been ideal in the Dark Ages.
    Where there is discord, may we bring harmony. Where there is error, may we bring truth. And where there is dispair, may be bring hope.

    --Margaret Thatcher

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Central OK
    Posts
    366
    Feedback Score
    0
    I have personally used both sugar and used honey, in wounds ranging from a simple cut finger to knee/elbow scrapes to moderate gashes. Both have worked for me, but honey worked a bit better. The advantage of sugar is that it stays in place better than honey.

    My preferred method is extensive irrigation and proper bandaging, though, until I can get somewhere where someone better trained than I can have a proper look at it.
    Sent from the future using Squid Telepathy

    Quote Originally Posted by MistWolf View Post
    If we could control all the variables, we'd just put all the bad luck on our enemies and stay home.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    35
    Feedback Score
    0
    Interesting topic.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    4,787
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)
    Silly, IMHO.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    36
    Feedback Score
    4 (100%)
    Interesting. Seems like a stretch though.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Cesspool, CA
    Posts
    170
    Feedback Score
    12 (100%)
    We've used Menuka Honey - expensive but works well as nature super anti-microbial. Extra tacky and packs well.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    AFG
    Posts
    543
    Feedback Score
    7 (100%)
    I'm just a lowly EMT-B, but here's my opinion:

    Sterility should be your main concern in a field injury. Infection is serious shit and needs to be foremost in your mind. Apart from arterial bleeding, you'll have more than enough time to apply indirect/direct pressure and properly apply a pressure dressing. If you're willing to improvise and use honey/sugar on a cut, then you should be more than willing to hold pressure while tearing a sleeve off of your shirt.

    With arterial bleeding, if you're isolated and/or lost, then it's just your time to die. Unless you can make a field expedient TQ and apply it quickly, you're ****ed. (hence why I carry a CAT in my cargo pocket when hiking)

    Just my .02, but I really think there are far better methods to control bleeding than this. Carry a small med kit with you with cravats and gauze and you'll be more than capable of treating all but the most severe hemmorhage.
    OEF 09-10, 11-12, 14-present

  20. #20
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    4,787
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)
    It would be inconceivable to me that any competent EMS Medical Director would sign off on protocols that allowed EMTs to use honey or pancake syrup or any other breakfast table condiment on acute traumatic wounds. Likewise any competent ER physician or surgeon.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •