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View Full Version : Recommendations for rear stock rests, bags, monopod etc on LaRue OBR



JoshNC
10-02-11, 15:09
I had my LaRue 16 inch OBR out at the range for the second time this past week. Was shooting Black Hills 175GR OTM and Surplus Portugese 155gr fmj. All shooting was at 104 yds.

My rifle is set up with a Schmidt & Bender 4-16x PM2 in LaRue OSR mount, Magpul PRS buttstock, Magpul MIAD grip, and LaRue equipped Harris bipod.

I noticed firstly that I need ALOT of work on my precision rifle shooting skills. I frequently would have a nice sub-moa 4 shot group with the BH ammo only to pull the next two shots and have flyers. I was somewhat handicapped by my lack of a stable shooting platform on the buttstock and was curious to hear some suggestions.

I've been thinking of using a Versapod or similar monopod on the PRS' bottom rail. Have also considered bags.

m1ajunkie
10-02-11, 16:19
JoshNC,

I know exactly where you are coming from. I have an MWS that I could shoot great except for a flier here and there. Things got really bad when I installed a surefire brake, which changed the recoil impulse and put me back to square one. Since deciding I really needed work shooting the .308 gas gun, I registered for some training video's on another forum and with lots of dry fire I am extremely pleased with the results.

I have moved to a strait behind the rifle position, and love it. Really weird at first but once you get used to it, it works great. Second be sure to load the bipod, nothing crazy but enough to feel comfortable. The next thing is to make sure you are pulling rearward on the rifle with the firing hand. I have started laying my thumb on the right side of the reciever and pulling to the rear with my other three fingers. This elimated the butt sliding and slipping in my shoulder. Everything stays locked in and follow up shots are quick and easy. The last and biggest issue I have been fighting is follow through. Be sure you are holding the trigger to the rear after each shot. Takes a lot of practice, but I feel this is actually a vital part of accurate shooting. Of course, don't overlook your NPOA but the things listed above are things I was not doing and was getting fliers all the time. 7 of 10 shots would be sub moa and then the three fliers would open the group up to 2moa.

As for your question, I really prefer a bag over the monopod. To me the rifle I shot with monopod just wasn't as quick and easy to make adjustments with. Rear bags allow the user much easier control. I think a rear bag design and brand is up to the user. The one I am using is a home made deal that works for me, so once you find what you like just go with it.

Just to be clear, I am not saying you don't know how to shoot. These are items I just failed to do, or do correctly and it showed up when shooting the .308.

ALCOAR
10-02-11, 16:29
Great to hear m1a...that was the only thing I saw that was holding you back as denoted by a reply I submitted in a RR thread of yours. I would offer the same reply to Josh.




Just one quick thing I noticed on your prone shooting....it appears that your not squared up and centered properly. Get as centered as possible and square your shoulders up to the target....place you target hairs on the said target with as light of pressure from your part as possible...once the rifle is free of your hand and generally lined up with the target, slightly adjust your body positioning to move in slight increments "around" the rifle that should already be centered on the target. (note..this is opposed to getting your posture and final firing position set and then moving your rifle on the target according to how your body is planted.)

So in short adjust your prone body position around the rifle, not vise versa:)

eta... another reply in that same thread of m1a's thread that dealt with a very similar situation as Josh's.


If you notice how your groups opened up as you progressed through your shooting session they opened up til eventually you were off the paper. This tells me that you are really sapping your energy both physically and mentally....you can almost get away with muscling the rifle on that first group w. only two flyers...once you muscle that rifle for 3-4 more groups you start to hit 5-6 flyers per group......then your mental factor kicks in and at that point all is about lost. Technique, technique, technique...that is so critical when shooting prone supported. Your getting there and practice will cure it all in my opinion. It's not easy or every one would be doing it, I never shoot prone supported next to cavemen:cool:

elephantrider
10-03-11, 23:22
Work on gettign straight behind the rifle. Load your bipod with a little forward pressure, that will keep it from hoppong or bouncing on you. Don't try ang give a lot of forward pressure with just your support shoulder. Just move your whole body forward a little to load the bipod.

As for a rear support. I recomend a good bean bag. I use a TAB Gear bag and really like it. Similar bags are available from Redman Gear, or TRIAD tactical.

OTO27
10-04-11, 14:28
From the OP's post it seems he has narrowed down his handicap to simply keeping the butt stock stable. I canít recommend any kind of rest or sandbag, as I have never used them. The trick that does it for me is while laying prone I make a fist with my off hand and place it under the stock, almost griping the end of the stock with my index and thumb. It helps me stabilize the stock tremendously and has given me tighter groups than any other off hand technique.

x-STG1
10-04-11, 18:14
From the OP's post it seems he has narrowed down his handicap to simply keeping the butt stock stable. I canít recommend any kind of rest or sandbag, as I have never used them. The trick that does it for me is while laying prone I make a fist with my off hand and place it under the stock, almost griping the end of the stock with my index and thumb. It helps me stabilize the stock tremendously and has given me tighter groups than any other off hand technique.

I have used this rear bag from Triad Tactical http://www.triadtactical.com/Triad-Large-Tapered-Rear-Bag.html. I also use it as a front bag when not using a bipod, using OTO27's method to stabilize the rear stock.

bp7178
10-04-11, 20:43
You can always fill a sock with dirt, sand, kitty litter, rice etc, to try it out.

http://www.crosstac.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=94&category_id=36&vmcchk=1&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=53

I've had good luck with this. You have to play a bit with the fill level, but the quality of materials and workmanship is very good.

It comes with a poly bead fill, but I think its maybe a little too coarse. A finer poly bead may be better, but overall a minor concern.

If i'm not mistaken, the PRS probably has some add-on monopod products.

teflondon100
10-13-11, 11:02
When I get a flyer from hand loads. I find most of them come from scope parallax, improper check weld, forcing my position or not following through. I use many different rear bags and I prefer the bean style bags for prone and a leather bag for the bench.
I wish I could figure out why its always the 5th shot that ends up the flyer...

JoshNC
10-14-11, 11:38
Thanks for the suggestions guys.