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View Full Version : New AR10 Build. Geissele SSA-E vs Hi-Speed Match



stang46gt
10-06-11, 17:27
Let me start by saying I've searched and read every thread posted re: triggers for precision ar10s in this and a few other forums. This enabled me to narrow it down to two triggers, the Geissele SSA-E and the Geissele Hi-Speed Match. Though I've found detailed information on each trigger, I can't seem to decide which to get. I am in the process of building my 1st AR10.
All I have so far are: Armalite lower receiver and LR kit (less trigger group), Buffer tube, spring and buffer and two magazines. I want a 600+ yard precision rifle.

I've only shot long range back in the '80s when I served as a member of the Marksmanship Training Unit using the M14.

From what I've read I can't go wrong with either. My initial thought was to go with the SSA-E and if I did not like it for the ar10 I could use it to upgrade the trigger in my AR15. Any help would be appreciated.

ALCOAR
10-06-11, 18:16
I'd personally go with one of the non adjust Geissele enhanced triggers that are truly built for hard use. I would however strongly consider picking the SD-E trigger over the SSA-E. The SD-E's new design yields more sensitivity to your trigger finger and that in return makes the overall pull and break slightly more smooth and crisp. I just cannot imagine somebody trying both and not going w. the SD-E. You won't lose anything and imho have quite a bit to gain.

Both those triggers have silky smooth first stage take-ups, and then have extremely predictable firm second stage "walls" that break super crisply.

Unless you plan of using this rifle in competition or as a pure bench gun, the non adjust triggers will be more than sufficient for your AR10 precision use demands. They will be cheaper and more user friendly as well.

stang46gt
10-06-11, 19:04
I'd personally go with one of the non adjust Geissele enhanced triggers that are truly built for hard use. I would however strongly consider picking the SD-E trigger over the SSA-E. The SD-E's new design yields more sensitivity to your trigger finger and that in return makes the overall pull and break slightly more smooth and crisp. I just cannot imagine somebody trying both and not going w. the SD-E. You won't loose anything and imho have quite a bit to gain.

Both those triggers have silky smooth first stage take-ups, and then have extremely predictable firm second stage "walls" that break super crisply.

Unless you plan of using this rifle in competition or as a pure bench gun, the non adjust triggers will be more than sufficient for your AR10 precision use demands. They will be cheaper and more user friendly as well.

Trident82, I never gave, until now, the SD-E a thought. After reading the specs, it does sound like it will fit my needs. I agree with you, a non-adjustable one seems like the better option. Since I'm far from a precision shooter anymore it's more logical. Perhaps one day I need the adjustability fine tune things but maybe not now. The straight trigger bow is intriguing enough to try just for that alone. Thanks for the help

ALCOAR
10-06-11, 19:24
It's my pleasure:)

Not sure if you came across the thread linked below yet, however I have a standing offer that if somebody buys the SD-E and it disappoints them, I'm willing to buy it back from them.....yet to hear so much as a peep in regards to my offer. My SD-E honestly feels every bit as good today if not better than it did the day I received it. Just about every time it's used these days, it sees distances of 600yds + as it's currently residing in my SPR rifle.

The predictability and amazingly crisp break is worth the price of admission alone on this SD-E trigger.

https://www.m4carbine.net/showthread.php?t=65283&page=9

http://i52.tinypic.com/25z5phu.jpg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GaO5OGZblD0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rmy9K1G6k3Q

stang46gt
10-06-11, 19:54
I think you sold me on the SD-E. I figured if I did not like on my precision build I can use on another. I'm ordering tonight but can not use it until the build is complete, which may not be until spring. I'm trying to go with high-end components which, as you know, is costly. I hope you don't mind if I hit you up again for your thoughts. My next purchase is going to be the stock. I'm thinking Magpul PRS. I appreciate the advice.

ALCOAR
10-07-11, 00:33
Sure thing, feel free to PM me whenever.

In regards to stocks, I have only used a PRS on a cpl. of occasions as I haven't ever owned one in the past. I do think it makes the best true precision stock for the AR family of rifles, however it really limits you given it's size, weight, and fixed nature.

It has a couple of really nice features specifically tailored for precision application like the adjustable cheek riser, and the bottom rail specifically made to mount a monopod on.

With that said, I'd look into an UBR which is my favorite stock for precision ARs. The only issue is that some 7.62x51 ARs may require the use of a custom short buffer and spring, but that isn't a huge deal if you decide to go that route.

FromMyColdDeadHand
10-07-11, 02:10
I have a PRS on my LMT MWS and I do like it. Longer spring, softer shooting, all advantages over a carbine based system. With a MWS it helps to even out the weight distribution.

That said, after shooting different rifles in different configs, I think a brake might be the single best way to reduce the kick of a 308AR. Rifle length operating system helps, but the one variable I haven't tried is adjustable gas systems.

Yes, the PRS has the adjustable cheek piece. If you are shooting different positions, this might be nice, but if you are just going to prone out or bench the gun at the range, I think getting the scope at the right height with a mounting system is more effective than dialing up the Stock. The PRS does have the adjustable buttplate, but it really only makes things longer. That can work well in some modes of shooting prone, but to me, when really trying to 'ride' the rifle with an inboard stockplacement, a shorter stock might work advantageously.

Get your ring height right and use an A2, unless you are mounting some 56mm or higher optic and need to get higher off the bore.

Belmont31R
10-07-11, 02:26
I have a little different opinion between the Hi speed and SSA type triggers. For precision use I think the hi speed is a better trigger but for duty/light precision work I think the non adjustable would be better.


FWIW I had a Hi speed on my mk12 clone I had several thousand rounds through, and was pretty well used to it. Its definately a different feel than the SSA type triggers. Ive owned the SSA, SSA-E, SD-C, and SD-3G as well as KAC and LMT 2 stage triggers as well as numerous brands of USGI triggers.


One thing people seem to overlook is that these types of triggers which are adjustable are adjustable to adjust to the gun NOT to adjust trigger feel like many bolt action triggers are setup to do. The KAC trigger is supposed to be setup to work safely in the lower its placed in. In AR triggers you adjust the feel with different springs not with adjust the little allen head screws on them.


For precision work the Hi Speed DMR was a better than any of the non adjustable versions they offer. But its a more complicated trigger, and does require adjustment for SAFE operation in your lower. The drop in units are exactly that, less complicated, and less expensive. Geiselle got their name in competition shooting, got a mil contract, and then expanded into drop in AR units. They have done very well, and they are my first choice bar none.

maximus83
10-07-11, 14:31
Very educational posts on the Geissele trigger options and differences. I recently got an SSA-E trigger for the first time and put it on a precision rifle, and all I can say is that for my use, it's a fantastic trigger. From what I've read, it's also robust and reliable to use on a fighting gun. However, if you want to punch tiny holes in paper, there are probably lighter/smoother triggers to look at. It really depends on what your intended uses for the rifle are. In my simplistic way of looking at it, in AR triggers it seems there's a trade-off between two major factors: reliability, and a light/smooth trigger pull. You cannot have the best of both IMO, you have to compromise somewhat on one of these factors in order to increase the other one. If you are primarily building a target rifle (and it sounds like you might be), then probably as Trident says, you can find something better than the SSA-E. You'll give up some degree of reliability, but then, on target rifle, it's debatable how much you really need a "hard use" trigger anyway.

stang46gt
10-08-11, 16:09
Thanks for all the info folks. Midway said they shipped my SD-E trigger already. SInce I'm only ordering 1-2 components a month it will be a while before I can try it, unless I put it in one of the AR15's to test it out.

I will be around soaking up the info for my next purchase. My biggest concerns are the upper and glass. I want a 20" barrel and not sure of the glass yet.

Belmont31R
10-08-11, 16:20
Very educational posts on the Geissele trigger options and differences. I recently got an SSA-E trigger for the first time and put it on a precision rifle, and all I can say is that for my use, it's a fantastic trigger. From what I've read, it's also robust and reliable to use on a fighting gun. However, if you want to punch tiny holes in paper, there are probably lighter/smoother triggers to look at. It really depends on what your intended uses for the rifle are. In my simplistic way of looking at it, in AR triggers it seems there's a trade-off between two major factors: reliability, and a light/smooth trigger pull. You cannot have the best of both IMO, you have to compromise somewhat on one of these factors in order to increase the other one. If you are primarily building a target rifle (and it sounds like you might be), then probably as Trident says, you can find something better than the SSA-E. You'll give up some degree of reliability, but then, on target rifle, it's debatable how much you really need a "hard use" trigger anyway.




The basis of my opinions is that AR's are fighting/duty/military/home defense guns. People do use them for competition, which is fine, but precision competition does not always translate over into the above mentioned uses.

I think the HI Speed triggers would be fine for a duty gun, and I would trust one just only saying that the non adjustable versions offer a little bit more simplicity and are less likely to cause any issues. Not saying the HI Speed will cause issues on you just that a non adjustable version is less likely to. The HI Speed DMR is used by the military, and has had a fantastic track record in civilian use so I don't think its anything to worry about. Real world use shows its a reliable quality trigger but on paper maybe something non adjustable would be a bit more reliable theoretically speaking.

If you want to err on the side of utmost reliability then the non adjustables would be best. I would not hesitate to use a Hi speed in a duty related role just don't find the extra cost beneficial in that type of role. On my Mk12 build I enjoyed it a lot, and would not have changed it out for anything.

ALCOAR
10-08-11, 17:10
Thanks for all the info folks. Midway said they shipped my SD-E trigger already. SInce I'm only ordering 1-2 components a month it will be a while before I can try it, unless I put it in one of the AR15's to test it out.

I will be around soaking up the info for my next purchase. My biggest concerns are the upper and glass. I want a 20" barrel and not sure of the glass yet.

Drop that sucker in an AR15 and let it rip in interim:)

Since your looking at the most expensive stock and just bought the Ferrari of triggers, what's your budget for the glass? The glass will be arguably the most important component to this future build of yours.

maximus83
10-08-11, 22:16
If you want to err on the side of utmost reliability then the non adjustables would be best. I would not hesitate to use a Hi speed in a duty related role just don't find the extra cost beneficial in that type of role. On my Mk12 build I enjoyed it a lot, and would not have changed it out for anything.

Good point, and I guess it's consistent with what I was trying to get at, which is that the non-adjustable triggers are intended to OPTIMIZE reliability simply because there's less things to go wrong. But your other point is well taken: it's not exactly like the Geissele adjustable triggers are an accident waiting to happen. They have a pretty good track record as well, and could be a great choice for a precision rig. I should probably check out the SD-E sometime as well.

stang46gt
10-09-11, 15:33
Drop that sucker in an AR15 and let it rip in interim:)

Since your looking at the most expensive stock and just bought the Ferrari of triggers, what's your budget for the glass? The glass will be arguably the most important component to this future build of yours.

I've given the glass a lot of thought but have not done much research yet. I would like to keep the upper and glass uder 3K for the both. At this point I'm looking to get pointed in the general direction and I research more from there. Other than 1-200 yard hunting scopes I have not needed a long range scope since the early 80's and a lot have changed since then.