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Thread: K9 Preparedness Guide, FAQ & Link Thread

  1. #21
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    redacted.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gadsden11 View Post
    My unit buys a lot of equipment from elite k-9.
    http://www.elitek9.com/
    They have quality gear and good prices.
    Our local emergency vet put together basic first aid kit for all our vehicles that has stuff to treat non life threatening injuries. I would use my ifak for those. I have been thinking about a k-9 specific one though. Like this.
    http://www.elitek9.com/K-9-Tactical-...ductinfo/F030/
    Contents:

    4 xS-Rolled Gauze 2 xETD™ 4 in. Emergency Trauma Dressing 1 xETD™ Abdominal Emergency Trauma Dressing 1 xCombat Gauze™ Hemostatic Bandage 1 xNAR Needleless Saline Lock Kit 2 xARS® Needle Decompression Kit (14 G x3.25 in.) 2 xPetrolatum Gauze (3 in. x18 in.) 1 xSAM® Splint II (36 in. x4.25 in.) 1 xTrauma Shears (7.25 in.) 1 xEye Wash Solution 1 xSplinter Forceps 10 xBear Claw™ Nitrile Trauma Gloves (5 pr.) 1 xHydrogen Peroxide (8 oz) 1 xDigital Veterinary Thermometer 1 xTactical Black Muzzle 2 x2 in. Veterinary Elastic Adhesive Tape 2 x4 in. Veterinary Elastic Adhesive Tape 1 xBlack Flexible, Self-Adherent Bandaging Tape 1 xVeterinary Tissue Adhesive
    Here is my partner Aegis. He's a 2.5 year old Mal.

    And just for fun...
    as far as long term prepping things, aside from the med kit, I keep a few months of food on hand and have a years worth of basic stuff like hartworm, frontline, and a few weeks worth of antibiotics from the vet just in case.
    Great post! Your links have been added to the first post.

    Thanks for listing out the contents of that kit. I'm going to take a hard look at what they're doing - seems very good.

    Great looking Mal!
    Last edited by cinco; 09-09-12 at 14:01.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phila PD View Post
    I love dogs but suspect that they would be a liability and a drain on resources during a time of extreme need. Now I know dogs are considered a member of the family by many here but they are still just a animal and being such unpredictable in nature and disposable in a serious emergency.

    Being a multi decade LEO in a major city I have encountered thousands of dogs and have been able to observe common behavior traits which are not desirable when trying to live under the radar (Stealth) or travel. Dogs have a inherent need to protect their owners and territory and many here would say that during a time of emergency this is a force multiplier. But this same behavior also is a liability for those once again trying to lay low if the dog reacts to outside stimulus by barking or trying to run to the location of the disturbance giving your location up. Now if your on top of the dog maybe you can control him but if the dog or dogs are not immediately by your side then the jig is up and they are making a lot of noise.

    Also mostly one would not wish to allow your dog or dogs to venture out side to relieve them selfs if possible hostile were in the area so what measures have to taken manage dog waste and smell from inside the bug-in location?

    Dogs depending on size but especially service sized dogs need a good amount of food and water which may not be such a problem in the short term if your bugging in and have stored a large supply of dog food with your food stores but this planing falls apart once you have to bug out on foot or in a vehicle as now you have to hump additional weight to support a dog/dogs over the needs of yourself or family members.

    Now some may say while on the move I would just share my food and water with the dog, Really? Your are going to use food to sustain a dog over yourself and family? And what if you have more then one large dog with limited resources? Some may say they would hunt and gather supplies on the move but this action is unacceptable unless you have a silent mode for such (Bow, Crossbow or a "Can" for your weapons) and the movement to locate game would also expose you to contact with the bad guys or other hunting parties which is poor tactics.

    So my question to the multi dog owners is how are you going to over come all the liabilities of your dogs to were they are a positive advantage and not just a drain on resources and a sanitation issue over time. And once things get hard supply wise what would you do with such dogs that did not place addition risk to your parity.
    Thanks Philly for your post! All very good points and a very good post! For my situation, I'm alone. If I had wife/kids I would need to look differently at the situation.

    However, I'm single and family is all 1/2 continent away. Chances of inacting a local mutual defense pact is very slim. I'm already in a good rural spot for a BOL - minus some challenges (and who won't have challenges?). So all challenges will be met together with my "K9 family".

    In the event of a static BOL with a small MDP, the dogs (if provisioned properly) I see as a definite advantage - especially from the standpoint of alert and patrol for one man or small group. My old roomate had a Rottie at the time I had my first Lab. He was getting into basic Schutzhund training when we lived in a semi-rough neighborhood. He would give the command "Patrol!" to head out to the back yard or to respond to a sound. Ever after, I've used the same command so all my dogs habitually "patrol" my 1/2 mile of perimeter fence. We don't go out to the pasture for a walk, we go for a "Patrol" . Goofy maybe, but I see the benefit now.

    I'd also put thought into the need to move together across terrain in a bug-out situation. My hunting Labs were trained to basic whistle commands (sit/stay or come). So I bought a silent dog whistle and began training the dogs to come to the silent blow and to sit/stay. I'd put them on sit/stay in another room and then blow it while audibly whistling (gave 'em a cookie for reward). Out in the pasture, I'll put them on sit/stay and move off a 100 yards or more - then blowing the silent whistle to release them to move towards me. Kind of like poor man's bound and cover drill. So if I do have to move through unknown/hostile terrain, I'm hoping I can leave them in a sit/stay while I slow move/patrol on to a safe spot - then releasing the dogs to a mad dash bound. If something "interesting" happens while I'm moving - well, damn, all doggie hell is gonna break loose. It's a work in progress, but we have fun. Again, goofy? I dunno just games to the dogs now and it just may save our lives.

    Whether a fault or not, my sense of loyalty is very similar to a dog's. As the old saying goes "There are things worse than death." In my case, I could not live with myself if I betrayed thier trust & love to save my own hide. I wouldn't want to live that life. Some may think it sad, but at this point, they're all I have. I won't abandon them, so I will attempt to prepare and react as best I can.

    I'm fast approaching a solid year's worth of dog food (@ normal rations) with a separate "dog" rice & bean supply as a supplement. At this point, we could likely squeeze out better than 16-18 months of rations. I typically purchase enough Heartworm and FrontLine (flea/tick) meds at a time to last a year. However, I need to build up a buffer stock of those and other related items.

    In case of a bug-out situation, I'm no worse off provision wise with them along. Yes, on the move things will change and security, noise discipline, etc. is all a concern -but again I'll deal best I can. I know my liablities and am personally willing to accept them or work to overcome them.
    Last edited by cinco; 09-09-12 at 14:46.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phila PD View Post
    So my question to the multi dog owners is how are you going to over come all the liabilities of your dogs to were they are a positive advantage and not just a drain on resources and a sanitation issue over time. And once things get hard supply wise what would you do with such dogs that did not place addition risk to your parity.
    This could also be applied to kids/family members (although I wouldn't).

    I understand your point though and where you're coming from.

    My dogs = my kids (to my softy 'ol single self). So in the same way a parent would just deal with the inherent challenges of SHTF with kids, I will do the same with my dogs.

    For example:

    So my question to the multi kid parents is how are you going to over come all the liabilities of your kids to were they are a positive advantage and not just a drain on resources and a sanitation issue over time. And once things get hard supply wise what would you do with such kids that did not place addition risk to your parity.
    Last edited by cinco; 09-09-12 at 15:51.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by cinco View Post
    This could also be applied to kids/family members (although I wouldn't).

    I understand your point though and where you're coming from.

    My dogs = my kids (to my softy 'ol single self). So in the same way a parent would just deal with the inherent challenges of SHTF with kids, I will do the same with my dogs.

    For example:

    So my question to the multi kid parents is how are you going to over come all the liabilities of your kids to were they are a positive advantage and not just a drain on resources and a sanitation issue over time. And once things get hard supply wise what would you do with such kids that did not place addition risk to your parity.
    Depends on age, most kids 10 and up can pull the trigger on a .22LR rifle such as a Ruger 10/22 and with the addition of a simple red dot scope can be very accurate with same. They can complete simple tasks and with proper training help with first aid and day to day routines. They also can carry a simple light weight BOB and at least with my kids are well versed in camping outdoors in all seasonal conditions.

    Younger children are a much more challenging task but even then there is no way one can compare a Dog to be on the same level as a child survival wise. We may feel the same love for both child and dog but a young human child does not have the ability to survival on its own were a dog can be released and if in a country setting could fend for its self as its feral nurture comes into play.
    We are all inclined to judge ourselves by our ideals; others, by their acts.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phila PD View Post
    Depends on age, most kids 10 and up can pull the trigger on a .22LR rifle such as a Ruger 10/22 and with the addition of a simple red dot scope can be very accurate with same. They can complete simple tasks and with proper training help with first aid and day to day routines. They also can carry a simple light weight BOB and at least with my kids are well versed in camping outdoors in all seasonal conditions.

    Younger children are a much more challenging task but even then there is no way one can compare a Dog to be on the same level as a child survival wise. We may feel the same love for both child and dog but a young human child does not have the ability to survival on its own were a dog can be released and if in a country setting could fend for its self as its feral nurture comes into play.
    I agree. My point being I'll accept the challenges that come from my situation and subsequent decisions, same as you would for yours.

    I wish you the best Philly, as I respect your opinions and wisdom shared here on this great site. I just hope and pray this is all an excercise for us all. I appreciate your insight and perspective very much.

  7. #27
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    Gun/Noise Shy Training

    Quote Originally Posted by Six Feet Under View Post
    My roommate and I have a six year old chocolate lab (mine) and a five year old red heeler (his).

    I adopted my lab four years ago off a family who couldn't keep him because they were gone all the time and he was spending 80% of his life in a dog kennel. Roommate found his dog while he was on patrol, took him to the humane society and adopted him once all the paperwork cleared and they got him up to date on his shots. The red heeler is pretty skiddish and doesn't like it when I play guitar (acoustic or electric, doesn't matter), put away the dishes, listen to music at pretty much any level, etc. He always runs and hides in the closet, so I'm assuming he was abused and then dumped on the road somewhere.

    My lab doesn't really care for guns I don't think (he was in the room when I got shot a year after I got him and ever since if I pick one up and yell bang he hauls ass ) and the heeler will shake and shiver if you even set a gun down next to him... but they make an excellent early warning system.

    OBVIOUS DISCLAIMER - I'm no training expert, far from it. As the old saying goes "you always screw up your first dog (or two, three, etc.)". God knows I tried all I could (unknowingly), but my first dog was so gifted it mitigated my inexperience.


    I think a lot of owners, especially, those who own "rescues" face this same issue. I know I did/do. It's so hard to overcome issues that were imprinted prior to our coming upon the "scene".

    When I was training my first couple of Lab pups, I was really into reading Bill Tarrant ( http://www.gundogsupply.com/bill-tarrant.html and especially "Probelm Gun Dogs: How to Identify and Correct Thier Faults" http://www.gundogsupply.com/b79710.html )who advocated a personal bond with your hunting dogs. I used his approach to "prepare" my pups for a life in the field.

    Essentially, you use the old associative angle. You begin with a kiddie cap gun which is fired at a good distance from the pup that won't scare it. At that moment you present the pup with a treat or its meal. You then work in closer and closer. I'd take the pups for a play day in the fields next to our local trap/skeet club while picnicing with cheeseburgers. Those dogs ended up loving gunshots.

    Then there's the old "chain gang" approach where the various dogs are kept on leashes (or multi-lead chain - think like a sled dog set up staked to the ground). The shy dog sees the other dogs enjoying the situation and get fired up by the pack atmosphere and tend to forget or overcome the "fear trigger".

    However, my situation with some of my rescues was not so easy. Just slow and easy. Some took over a year. Some are still "concerned" you could say. But it did get better. Good luck.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by cinco View Post
    I agree. My point being I'll accept the challenges that come from my situation and subsequent decisions, same as you would for yours.

    I wish you the best Philly, as I respect your opinions and wisdom shared here on this great site. I just hope and pray this is all an excercise for us all. I appreciate your insight and perspective very much.

    On the pet side I have no doubt that a certain dog hating mouser (Who's picture and story is else where on this forum) would be tagging a long with us to the bug-out location to earn its keep by killing any vermin at the remote location.

    This I know I would have no choice as the family would over ride any decision I made to the kitties status and bring her a long. I completely understand your commitment to your canine family and hope that your planing allows them to remain at your side for many years to come no matter what happens.
    We are all inclined to judge ourselves by our ideals; others, by their acts.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phila PD View Post
    On the pet side I have no doubt that a certain dog hating mouser (Who's picture and story is else where on this forum) would be tagging a long with us to the bug-out location to earn its keep by killing any vermin at the remote location.

    This I know I would have no choice as the family would over ride any decision I made to the kitties status and bring her a long. I completely understand your commitment to your canine family and hope that your planing allows them to remain at your side for many years to come no matter what happens.
    Thank you sir! Good luck with kittah!

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