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Thread: TQ vs pressure dressing

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    TQ vs pressure dressing

    Let me preface this by saying I think the proliferation of tourniquets in tactical gear is great. I'm not a first responder or professional shooter but I keep one in my range bag and on my chest rig. And I've seen a lot of folks attaching them to their weapons. I'll throw the number one name out there- Paul Howe, who when I see him do something with his gear I immediately start thinking I should do it.

    I'm just wondering if your going to attach a first aid item to your weapon, your basically prioritizing one item over all others. I would think that item should be a pressure dressing. We have much better dressings than we used to (IDF dressings) A pressure dressing will work as a TQ, or as a chest seal in a pinch. I think carrying more dressings would be more important than any other single piece of gear.

    Just curious if anyone else has had this thought.

    And it's not new...

    You look at pics of ANZAC soldiers in Vietnam they all had a field dressing attached to their weapon


    And I think it was SOP for a lot of the airborne in WWII


    Back in my grunt days we only carried one dressing on our LBE, but when on the DMZ we made a point to have several more.
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    I think that the tq being priority has come about from our current conflicts, alot of amputations from ieds. Personally when I'm deployed I carry 3, one on my belt line kit, one on my PC/ chest rig and one attached to my rifle stock. Reasoning behind it all is even if a tq isn't quite needed as long as we can get the casualty to a role 1 facility in time it isn't going to hurt anything. On the other hand if a dude needs a tq but we first put on an Israeli, then were actually creating another step if a tq is needed.
    The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step...and a lot of bitching.

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    Quote Originally Posted by currahee View Post
    I'm just wondering if your going to attach a first aid item to your weapon, your basically prioritizing one item over all others. I would think that item should be a pressure dressing. We have much better dressings than we used to (IDF dressings) A pressure dressing will work as a TQ, or as a chest seal in a pinch. I think carrying more dressings would be more important than any other single piece of gear.


    A pressure dressing will work as a... pressure dressing "in a pinch", it will not work as a TQ or chest seal.

    If someone (possibly yourself) has an injury that requires a TQ or chest seal, use the appropriate item for the injury rather than trying to "improvise" a fix designed for something else.

    BTW- Israeli bandages are not that much better than the old field dressings, there are better dressings out there than the Israeli bandage.

    The US military has the lowest combat fatality rate in the history of recorded warfare, in large part due to the lessons learned from previous conflicts. So pictures of soldiers in past wars (who were never issued TQ's or chest seals) carrying field dressings is irrelevant and misleading.

    Having said that, carry whatever you feel is appropriate

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    Quote Originally Posted by Treehopr View Post


    A pressure dressing will work as a... pressure dressing "in a pinch", it will not work as a TQ or chest seal.

    If someone (possibly yourself) has an injury that requires a TQ or chest seal, use the appropriate item for the injury rather than trying to "improvise" a fix designed for something else.

    BTW- Israeli bandages are not that much better than the old field dressings, there are better dressings out there than the Israeli bandage.

    The US military has the lowest combat fatality rate in the history of recorded warfare, in large part due to the lessons learned from previous conflicts. So pictures of soldiers in past wars (who were never issued TQ's or chest seals) carrying field dressings is irrelevant and misleading.

    Having said that, carry whatever you feel is appropriate
    I guess you missed the part where I said I carry a couple of TQs huh?

    My question is this... if you can only carry so many items, would you rather be heavy on the thing that is more multi-purpose? You seemed to have missed the entire point, because undoubtedly the dressing makes a much better TQ than a TQ makes a dressing.

    Kest gave me an awesome answer... makes sense if the most likely injury is a traumatic amputation I would rather have more TQs- makes sense and I will incorporate it in to my knowledge base.

    I will say, beyond a doubt, that the IDF dressing is FAR greater than what we were issued in the 90s.... if you think there is something better please enlighten.
    Every citizen should be a soldier. This was the case with the Greeks and Romans and must be that of every free state. - T. Jefferson

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    Quote Originally Posted by currahee View Post
    I guess you missed the part where I said I carry a couple of TQs huh?

    My question is this... if you can only carry so many items, would you rather be heavy on the thing that is more multi-purpose? You seemed to have missed the entire point, because undoubtedly the dressing makes a much better TQ than a TQ makes a dressing.

    Kest gave me an awesome answer... makes sense if the most likely injury is a traumatic amputation I would rather have more TQs- makes sense and I will incorporate it in to my knowledge base.

    I will say, beyond a doubt, that the IDF dressing is FAR greater than what we were issued in the 90s.... if you think there is something better please enlighten.
    Nope, I read where you stated that you kept TQ's in your range bag and chest rig.... and then proceeded to make the point that you think it would be more practical to carry an Israeli dressing.

    Your false premise is "if you can only carry so many items"- where does that restriction come from? There are active duty ground pounders that roll outside the wire with 2 or 3 TQ's and an IFAK, if its important to have then bring it with you.

    A TQ, Israeli dressing and chest seal do not take up much room. If your medical skills are based on 1990's doctrine then carry on with whatever is appropriate to your level of training.

    I only use Israeli bandages for training and that's only because I get them for free.

    For my med kits I stock them with Olaes Modular Bandages

    Designed by an 18D, he created the Olaes modular bandage and named it after SSgt Tony Olaes so that it would offer more flexibility in treating different injuries (not designed to be used as a chest seal or TQ by the way)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Treehopr View Post
    Nope, I read where you stated that you kept TQ's in your range bag and chest rig.... and then proceeded to make the point that you think it would be more practical to carry an Israeli dressing.

    Your false premise is "if you can only carry so many items"- where does that restriction come from? There are active duty ground pounders that roll outside the wire with 2 or 3 TQ's and an IFAK, if its important to have then bring it with you.

    A TQ, Israeli dressing and chest seal do not take up much room. If your medical skills are based on 1990's doctrine then carry on with whatever is appropriate to your level of training.

    I only use Israeli bandages for training and that's only because I get them for free.

    For my med kits I stock them with Olaes Modular Bandages

    Designed by an 18D, he created the Olaes modular bandage and named it after SSgt Tony Olaes so that it would offer more flexibility in treating different injuries (not designed to be used as a chest seal or TQ by the way)
    Do I did not suggest that I would get rid of my TQs I think having them is a great idea. The question is, if I'm gonna add one more thing should it be a TQ or a dressing. Sure those things don't take up much space but I carry multiples of each.

    Thank you for the link to the dressing, I see the main advantage as being the extra gauze to cover an exit wound.
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    Treehopr beat me to it...

    I carry multiple TQ's on me. I run warrants and track down violent criminals all day long. I keep a TQ in each cargo pocket, along with 3 sets of gloves, and an Oales bandage. The Oales is by far the best thing I've come across in a long time, and they're cheap. The Oales also has the occlusive sheet which could be used for a tension pneumothorax. On top of that I have a kit on my plate carrier and an additional TQ in a LBT horizontal pouch that sits under the cummerbund. I also carry a full med kit loaded down with chem lights and 3 spare rifle mags just in case something goes very bad.

    As for only one item, I'd take a TQ over anything else. I'm sure you know, but a TQ is designed to cut off the most severe types of bleeding. A pressure dressing is a step down from that and I would not put that much faith in a pressure dressing to act the same as a TQ. Pressure dressings have elastic in the bands, which isn't conducive to locking down an artery. It also seems much easier to make a pressure dressing than it would a TQ.
    "My craving is, and always has been, to be involved in actions conducted to ensure America remains strong, safe, and free of those who have its destruction as their goal."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vendetta View Post
    Treehopr beat me to it...

    I carry multiple TQ's on me. I run warrants and track down violent criminals all day long. I keep a TQ in each cargo pocket, along with 3 sets of gloves, and an Oales bandage. The Oales is by far the best thing I've come across in a long time, and they're cheap. The Oales also has the occlusive sheet which could be used for a tension pneumothorax. On top of that I have a kit on my plate carrier and an additional TQ in a LBT horizontal pouch that sits under the cummerbund. I also carry a full med kit loaded down with chem lights and 3 spare rifle mags just in case something goes very bad.

    As for only one item, I'd take a TQ over anything else. I'm sure you know, but a TQ is designed to cut off the most severe types of bleeding. A pressure dressing is a step down from that and I would not put that much faith in a pressure dressing to act the same as a TQ. Pressure dressings have elastic in the bands, which isn't conducive to locking down an artery. It also seems much easier to make a pressure dressing than it would a TQ.
    If you could only have ONE item it would be a TQ- an item that, by definition, can only treat a wound to an extremity. OK

    To make a reasonable facsimile of a pressure dressing you need a maxi-pad an ACE bandage(or roll of duct tape), to make a TQ you need a belt and a stick. Which would you rather be looking for when someone is bleeding out in front of you?

    Let me rephrase the OP... "hey I carry pressure dressings and TQs, I noticed people attaching another something to the weapons, out of those two which would make more sense."
    Every citizen should be a soldier. This was the case with the Greeks and Romans and must be that of every free state. - T. Jefferson

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  9. #9
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    Ok, let me rephrase. I've been in positions where I have applied TQ's, make shift TQ's, pressure dressings, and make shift pressure dressings.

    For one item, yes, I'd rather carry a TQ that will cut off spurting blood from an artery, because I'd rather have the blood flow cut off that's actually shooting out of me. A pressure dressing will not stop that nearly as effective.

    A pressure dressing is for a lower level of bleeding. Everyone wears clothes. Pressure dressings can be made out of t shirts. The idea is to have an absorbent piece of material and something to hold it down. Hands work well, as will another piece of clothing that you tore off to make that dressing.

    I know what I would rather deal with, because I've been in those positions.
    Last edited by Vendetta; 08-11-13 at 11:34.
    "My craving is, and always has been, to be involved in actions conducted to ensure America remains strong, safe, and free of those who have its destruction as their goal."
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    "When you enter a room full of armed men, shoot the first person who moves, hostile or otherwise. He has started to think and is therefore dangerous."
    - Robert "Paddy" Mayne

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    Part of what you're missing from some of these replies is that with the advent of body armor a larger percentage of serious wounds are going to be in the extremities. Certainly the sides are vulnerable, and inevitably shit will just happen. But I'm willing to bet that the statistics back that up.

    John Doe as a citizen driving around town is more likely to come across someone with a crushed leg from a car accident, a missing hand from screwing around with a boat propeller, or a chainsaw accident than he is someone with holes in his torso from a gunfight.

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