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Thread: Favorite Drills

  1. #21
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    Ive had years of trouble free use from my Pact Club Timer III. Its always in my range bag.
    NOT in training for combat deployment.

  2. #22
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    Here's a review, but it's a couple of years old, and there are some others out now (or newer versions of the same).
    www.sportshooter.com/gear/rev_timers.asp

    I'd make sure whatever you get works with dry-fire.
    It's nice to practice your drawstroke/dry snap with the timer, but I've heard that some won't pick up a dry fire snap.
    My CED8000 (usually) will, but I've heard others with the same timer say theirs won't.
    It may be the gun being used- I use external hammer guns like 1911s and HiPowers, and for all I know they may be using something like a Glock, which is a little quieter.

  3. #23
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    I bought a cheapie from CTD about 2 and a half years ago. It's been in the side pocket of my range bag getting slammed against everything on the way to and from the range, and it still works fine. I've used in in drizzling rain, but never a steady rain or a downpour.

    Looks like CTD sells Glock timers now, but Midway USA has the model I bought:
    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=772064
    They had no right to win. Yet they did, and in doing so they changed the course of a war...even against the greatest of odds, there is something in the human spirit - a magic blend of skill, faith and valor - that can lift men from certain defeat to incredible victory.

  4. #24
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    While not a "dry fire drill" I think this will help.

    Have a buddy load your mags, say 10 or 15 rds each and add anywhere in the mag some snap caps or other inert round (if you reload put some together without primer & powder). Slow fire at whatever target/range combo you want. If you're doing your job with trigger control you won't jerk the rifle when you drop the hammer on the dumby round. Man I HATE it when I jerk the weapon when doing this.

    This also works great for handguns and failure to fire drills for any semi auto, long or handgun. But for now use it to learn trigger control.

    If you're by yourself load 3 or 4 mags and put a dumby round in one or two mags only. Mix them up and fire away.
    Last edited by Jay Cunningham; 07-11-08 at 21:03.

  5. #25
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    An Honest Day at the Range.

    Just a word on any time you go to the range to practice. Whether it be a simple day of shooting or a full on Tactical Training class, be honest with yourself.

    If you cannot (do not) account for and claim each and every shot you take, you are only being dishonest with yourself. I have seen lots of trigger presses that you wonder what was being shot at, then to see the shooter turn and appear pleased that he got the rounds off so quickly, blows my mind.
    Last edited by Jay Cunningham; 07-11-08 at 21:04.
    May the earth not rise up to smite thee.
    www.adcofirearms.com

  6. #26
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    I have moved into a more intuitive method of shooting, with the methodology of getting combat accurate hits. This means balancing speed and precision. Knowing when to shoot intuitivly and fast (letting my mind and confidence level tell me when I need and dont need my sights) and then knowing when to use my sights and slow down at longer ranges but still get fast combat accurate hits. Combat accurate hits to me dosen't mean shooting a 3inch rathole at all ranges. To me it means stopping the threat... or even changing his course of action... I shoot a 6 shot 3in group in his chest at 10yards then I am being very effective but I am not being efficient, now if I speed up and shoot and 8-10 inch group in his chest then now I am being efficient and getting maximum combat hits.

    Its a method of using what the body does naturally, for example: during a critical incident our eyes will focus on the threat more due to an increase of bloodflow to the rods in the eye, otherwise known as "Tunnel vision"
    This actually makes us more dangerous and allows us to shoot more intuitivley at the threat. So the more non-sighted fire or point shooting you can do at closer ranges the better off you will fare when your body reacts under a critical stress incident.

    So I like to use targets such as DT-2C colored number targets, or if I dont have them I draw different size shaped and numbers on some IPSC targets or cardboard. this allows me to conduct drills that force me to the edge of my shooting ability. I know I can shoot more intuitivley at the the larger targets but have to slow down for smaller ones. If I shoot tight groups than that tells me to speed up, If I'm outside the shapes than I obviously need to slow down. this is a great drill becuase if I am in a lack of time it can all be done from one range and gives me a very quick but Effecient workout on the range.
    TRAVIS HALEY
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    Haley Strategic Partners, LLC.
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  7. #27
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    When I go to the range for practice (vs. plinking, performing a functions check, or confirming zero), I always do so for a purpose.

    What this means is I do so with a specific set of objectives. I identify a primary objective (IE: single-shot presentation from the holster) and decide on what standards I will shoot for (IE: first-shot hit on 3x5 card at 21-feet from the holster in 1.8-seconds).

    I also identify secondary (IE: 1/4-second follow-up shot) and alternative options but I normally do not go beyond the secondary objective until I've met the primary objective. In other words, if I really sucked during the practice session, I will only attempt the first two objectives with some exceptions.

    Sometimes I will identify a standard that I know is not within my current skill level. The purpose of this is to force me out of my conmort zone and to help me identify my current limitations. While I know a sub 1-second shot from concealment (IDPA start: hands relaxed by my sides with the gun in an IWB holster under a t-shirt) is virtually impossible. Trying to achieve it can be a lot of fun and can sometimes help build one's confidence.

    The caveat to all of this is as PropDoc says, you must be honest with yourself. Don't count a miss a hit and accept your llimitations as something you should work on and try to improve on. For example, if for some miracle I did get a shot off in under 1-second from concealement; I still do not count it as a success unless the shot is not where I was trying to put it. I don't care if my shot ended up in the anatomically correct target's heart if I was trying to put it between its eyes!!

    FWIW, I sometimes videotape myself for further analysis and scrutiny. You'll be suprised just how many bad habits you pick up over time.
    We must not believe the Evil One when he tells us that there is nothing we can do in the face of violence, injustice and sin. - Pope Francis I

  8. #28
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    One thing I took home from one of the blocks of instruction, when you go to the range, go with specific goals and intentions to work on ONE or TWO things.

    For example, "I am going to practice and ensure that I feel the trigger reset on EVERY ROUND I SHOOT today."

    Or, "I am going to find my front sight at the proper point in space and time when shooting.."

    "I am going to work on getting the proper grip on my pistol's frame before I present my weapon"

    "I am going to work on my follow through and not allow my eye to leave the scope nor my cheek to come off the stock until I feel my follow through is complete"

    "I am going to make my tac reload as smooth as possible, and smooth today means slow. Which is ok..."



    These are some of the things that come to mind right now that I have said to myself when going to the range, working on the fundamentals, building them like legos, has helped me alot....
    Last edited by Jay Cunningham; 07-11-08 at 21:04.

  9. #29
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    Man, i am really enjoying reading the different styles and types of practice. Really nice to see people doing it with a purpose. As for SimplyDynamic's "Intuitive" shooting, I practice that a lot and agree with your points........but i figure back to basics is always good now and then.

    Point and shoot becomes easier if you can draw the pistol and align the sights first. Then you will develop a "feel" for where you point when you bring your weapon to bare. We have been pointing our finger at stuff with a fair amount of accuracy for years......now it's just a different appendage. Sweet.
    May the earth not rise up to smite thee.
    www.adcofirearms.com

  10. #30
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    I agree.. when I go to the range. I have a purpose and a goal in mind. My practice sessions have been much better since I bought and use a Timer,
    I try to focus on specific tasks (e.g.Reloading,pairs,etc). My ammo count is usually less then 200 rds. It's the quality vs. the quantity of practice that I find important.

    I also try to follow what Travis explained about the speed vs. Accuracy. Groups to small.. your going to slow.. groups to big.. your going to fast. Find that happy medium and then maintain that zone.

    I like a good dot drill for trigger control/sight alignment practice.

    I use my own Cardboard cut out IDPA type target. I use a 8" circle high on the "chest" for COM (Drawn in light pencil)and a moddified "brain Box" drawn on the head.

    I use Pencil so I don't fixate on a dark black circle drawn with a Sharpie. Since I rarely see people walking around with a 3" x 5" Box drawn on there forehead...(at least around where I live... )

    The Timer is a great tool to use along with a practice log. so you can see if your getting better or not.

    Consistent execution of the basic fundamentals of Marksmanship.... that's the ticket... That's what I constantly strive for...
    Last edited by Jay Cunningham; 07-11-08 at 21:05.

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