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Thread: Legal Considerations for Tactical Medical Responders (Book)

  1. #1
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    Legal Considerations for Tactical Medical Responders (Book)

    New book of interest to first responders, tac medic in particular. Written by a buddy of mine, Raffaele Di Giorgio.


    Legal Considerations for Tactical Medical Responders: For Both the Individuals and Agencies Kindle Edition


    This book is about protecting our protectors. The men and women, and the agencies they work for, who go out every day and risk their lives to protect and serve the public.

    The purpose of this book is to highlight the common reasons why liability lawsuits occur with the use of tactical medical responders (Fire, EMS, Police), as well as how to prepare and protect yourself and your department.

    Good training by qualified instructors, and well thought out, expertly prepared policies and procedures are your best shields against liability.

    Injuries or other conditions which require medical attention happen all too frequently in public safety situations. Sometimes, this medical need is provided by a medically trained civilian, and sometimes it is a law enforcement officer who has been trained to address these situations.

    Regardless of who is providing the medical services, there are LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS.

    We live in a world in which liability must be considered at all times, both civil and criminal. This book is a broad brush attempt to address these concerns so that law enforcement Responders and civilians working for or with law enforcement can avoid getting themselves entangled in a lawsuit of their own.

    For better or for worse, we live in an era in which it isn’t enough for us to know how to do our jobs, we also need to know how to do our jobs without getting sued. What makes sense for our industries may set us up for liabilities in ways we hadn’t even considered.

    Via Amazon HERE
    - Will

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    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

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    Mr. Brink, what the heck is a "Tactical" medical responder? A paramedic in 511 pants?

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    Quote Originally Posted by HKGuns View Post
    Mr. Brink, what the heck is a "Tactical" medical responder? A paramedic in 511 pants?
    You'd have to ask the author on his choice O words HK. I'm just the messenger on this one. I assumed any "Tactical" medical responder" would be wearing all black, but wadda I know?
    - Will

    General Performance/Fitness Advice for all

    www.BrinkZone.com

    Performance/Fitness Advice For the Tactical Community

    www.OptimalSWAT.com


    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

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    Tactical EMS has been around since the late 1990's. EMT Paramedics trained to deliver Advanced Life Support care inside the inner perimeter of SWAT operations. As opposed to waiting around with their ambulance parked at the staging area waiting for SWAT officers to bring the dead and wounded out to them at the conclusion. Review the news footage from the Branch Davidian thing at Waco and you'll see what Tactical EMS isn't.

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    The combat medic of a SWAT/Active Shooter response.

    In a lot of cases they are medics first and police second (but can still get it on if need be).

    In a lot of cases for both suspect and officer alike; seconds count for GSW or stabbings.

    It's pretty touchy because they are assuming almost double liability, yet their job is to keep people alive.

    It's pretty relevant and with the BS going on it's getting harder and harder to find people who competent paramedics willing to do gangster mess or experienced officers willing and able to successfully be trained as medics (which can take a lot of time). And not for the best pay in the world.

    Especially these days.

    It is NOT a rookie job.

    ETA I'm also reminded of a saying "The quickest way to get in trouble is to be good at your job, kid"
    Last edited by Firefly; 04-03-16 at 14:27.

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    Complicating the discussion: Definitions and application vary widely for tactical medical response, TEMS, etc. In simplest terms it is the tactically smart and prioritized application of specified medical skills, in a LE/combative context, and outside traditional care channels. A "tactical medic" is trained to a level of some sort, if only a short BLS tacmed course, and is increasingly likely to not be a paramedic. Also, a tactical medic isn't necessarily a team medic, and could hold a number of assignments or duties.

    (See also: wilderness responder / wilderness medic / expeditionary medic)
    2012 National Zumba Endurance Champion
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firefly View Post
    In a lot of cases they are medics first and police second (but can still get it on if need be).
    In a lot of cases, they aren't police at all. Medics only. Training EMT-Ps (Paramedics) for SWAT response is the optimal route, but that relies on an outside agency (usually), requires medical control, and is likely to be expensive if they can't muster a volunteer group.

    In a lot of cases, police departments train a SWAT officer as an EMT. Technically, a Tactical Medic I suppose, but the level of EMS care they can deliver is Basic Life Support only and therefore very limited. Better than nothing, certainly, but not Tactical EMS in the strict sense.

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    You learn something every day, I'd never heard of that role, thanks for the information. I was only half being a smart@ss.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hmac View Post
    In a lot of cases, they aren't police at all. Medics only. Training EMT-Ps (Paramedics) for SWAT response is the optimal route, but that relies on an outside agency (usually), requires medical control, and is likely to be expensive if they can't muster a volunteer group.

    In a lot of cases, police departments train a SWAT officer as an EMT. Technically, a Tactical Medic I suppose, but the level of EMS care they can deliver is Basic Life Support only and therefore very limited. Better than nothing, certainly, but not Tactical EMS in the strict sense.
    I agree with 5/8s to 3/4s of that. If you're going in, you're going to be at a modicum sworn, if even in a reserve capacity, and armed and at least given cursory weapons training.

    Some guys are pretty hooah and wanna do that who are already Paramedics or EMT-As.
    But that's getting rarer (or at lest seems that way)

    But most people do designate a smart guy and send them to First Responder or EMT but it can take a while to get him fully trained.

    It takes less time, arguably to teach someone to shoot than to do competent EMT level work. Ideally...you'd want someone already at the EMT level than the inverse.

    Or some people just stage up ambulances a safe distance away. But then that still cuts into precious time.

    Most people really just do that and try to brush up on IFAK use. But it's not quite the same level of advantage.

    Honestly most outfits don't properly train as is and usually get by on the sheer stupidity of the suspects.

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    Pretty enlightening thread.
    I would guess there are enough guys right now trying to get in to, about to graduate from or a recent graduate of an EMT school who are or were medics who have some rather lengthy experience fighting in the GWOT.
    It would seem to me, (an admitted novice) that it would be a "Buyers Market" as I would think these guys cannot be that hard to find.
    If I was young and full of piss and vinegar again it would sound like a heck of a lot of fun.

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