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Thread: Legal Considerations for Tactical Medical Responders (Book)

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillBrink View Post
    New book of interest to first responders, tac medic in particular. Written by a buddy of mine, Raffaele Di Giorgio.


    Legal Considerations for Tactical Medical Responders: For Both the Individuals and Agencies Kindle Edition


    This book is about protecting our protectors. The men and women, and the agencies they work for, who go out every day and risk their lives to protect and serve the public.

    The purpose of this book is to highlight the common reasons why liability lawsuits occur with the use of tactical medical responders (Fire, EMS, Police), as well as how to prepare and protect yourself and your department.

    Good training by qualified instructors, and well thought out, expertly prepared policies and procedures are your best shields against liability.

    Injuries or other conditions which require medical attention happen all too frequently in public safety situations. Sometimes, this medical need is provided by a medically trained civilian, and sometimes it is a law enforcement officer who has been trained to address these situations.

    Regardless of who is providing the medical services, there are LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS.

    We live in a world in which liability must be considered at all times, both civil and criminal. This book is a broad brush attempt to address these concerns so that law enforcement Responders and civilians working for or with law enforcement can avoid getting themselves entangled in a lawsuit of their own.

    For better or for worse, we live in an era in which it isn’t enough for us to know how to do our jobs, we also need to know how to do our jobs without getting sued. What makes sense for our industries may set us up for liabilities in ways we hadn’t even considered.

    Via Amazon HERE
    Gotta say Will, your loyalty to those around you shines through.

    While I am not an EMS or Medic, in any which way, I think any First Aid/CPR trained potential "Good Samaritan" may want to read this too.

    Liability is a very real, and growing, topic. I absolutely agree with, and respect, the point of this book.

    Definitely on my reading list.

    ETA: I LOVE having Kindle Unlimited. Tell Raffaele we truly appreciate that being available as a user. (Reading it now)
    Last edited by HeruMew; 04-08-16 at 18:40.

  2. #32
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    I'm a little late to this discussion, but I'm curious if the information in this book is relevant to military medics and Combat Lifesaver (CLS)-trained soldiers in a civilian situation. I had a conversation with my medics recently about how they are cautioned about using their training in a civilian situation because of differing opinions and laws regarding the use of things like tourniquets. I've been through CLS and additional sustainment training, and I ended up treating someone who was injured (not too seriously, fortunately) in a car accident I witnessed about 6 months ago. I'm sure it differs by state (such as in those with Good Samaritan laws), but I hadn't really thought about liability at the time. I just sent a note to my JAG asking if they have any references for this sort of situation. I can post their feedback if anyone is interested.

    Dave

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by HeruMew View Post
    Gotta say Will, your loyalty to those around you shines through.

    While I am not an EMS or Medic, in any which way, I think any First Aid/CPR trained potential "Good Samaritan" may want to read this too.

    Liability is a very real, and growing, topic. I absolutely agree with, and respect, the point of this book.

    Definitely on my reading list.

    ETA: I LOVE having Kindle Unlimited. Tell Raffaele we truly appreciate that being available as a user. (Reading it now)
    Thanx man, I try. Raffaele is legit and clearly focused on the mission of assisting first responders. I'm tryin' to pick up karma points man

    Quote Originally Posted by 3ACR_Scout View Post
    I'm a little late to this discussion, but I'm curious if the information in this book is relevant to military medics and Combat Lifesaver (CLS)-trained soldiers in a civilian situation. I had a conversation with my medics recently about how they are cautioned about using their training in a civilian situation because of differing opinions and laws regarding the use of things like tourniquets. I've been through CLS and additional sustainment training, and I ended up treating someone who was injured (not too seriously, fortunately) in a car accident I witnessed about 6 months ago. I'm sure it differs by state (such as in those with Good Samaritan laws), but I hadn't really thought about liability at the time. I just sent a note to my JAG asking if they have any references for this sort of situation. I can post their feedback if anyone is interested.

    Dave
    Above my pay grade. You can contact Raffaele via FB easily and or he may see this post and respond. I'm assuming the answer is yes, but he'd have to comment and maybe others here who have read it and comment.
    - Will

    General Performance/Fitness Advice for all

    www.BrinkZone.com

    Performance/Fitness Advice For the Tactical Community

    www.OptimalSWAT.com


    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

  4. #34
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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillBrink View Post
    Thanx man, I try. Raffaele is legit and clearly focused on the mission of assisting first responders. I'm tryin' to pick up karma points man



    Above my pay grade. You can contact Raffaele via FB easily and or he may see this post and respond. I'm assuming the answer is yes, but he'd have to comment and maybe others here who have read it and comment.
    Quote Originally Posted by 3ACR_Scout View Post
    I'm a little late to this discussion, but I'm curious if the information in this book is relevant to military medics and Combat Lifesaver (CLS)-trained soldiers in a civilian situation. I had a conversation with my medics recently about how they are cautioned about using their training in a civilian situation because of differing opinions and laws regarding the use of things like tourniquets. I've been through CLS and additional sustainment training, and I ended up treating someone who was injured (not too seriously, fortunately) in a car accident I witnessed about 6 months ago. I'm sure it differs by state (such as in those with Good Samaritan laws), but I hadn't really thought about liability at the time. I just sent a note to my JAG asking if they have any references for this sort of situation. I can post their feedback if anyone is interested.

    Dave
    Yes sir, I believe you will find a very relevant to what you can do as a military medic off post versus what you can do on post depending on your current licensure and whether or not you are affiliated with a local EMS provider. I am always open to answering any questions. I apologize for taking so long to respond here, just been in and out of country a lot lately.

    If after reading the book you have any questions I will be more than happy to help out where and if I can.

    Raffaele

  6. #36
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    Author of the book in the OP, my pal Raffaele Di Giorgio, has a new article in SWAT:

    On the Bleeding Edge: Tactical Combat Casualty Care for Civilian Medics

    Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) is a concept developed for highly trained military medics in combat. These medics operate in a completely different arena than their civilian counterparts, working within an expanded scope of practice that is only allowed when operating in a specific environment, such as a combat zone.

    TCCC was established because trauma care protocols for civilians did not address the needs of medics working in combat situations. In the 1990s Army Combat Medics followed Basic and Advanced Trauma Life Support protocols (ATLS). It became clear that these protocols needed to be modified for combat situations. In 1996 TCCC guidelines were formalized and put into use by Special Operations forces.

    The guidelines were updated as Tactic Combat Casualty Care-2003. Advances in technology, tactics and pharmacology were included in the updated guidelines, which resulted in TCCC guidelines being used by more of the military. The guidelines reflect lessons learned in Vietnam and later combat situations as they relate to preventable deaths. For example, lack of hemorrhage control is the leading cause of preventable death on the battlefield. Tourniquets are used more quickly and for longer times than in civilian medical care.

    Could these new guidelines and protocols be used with civilian emergency medical systems?

    Cont:

    https://www.swatmag.com/article/blee...vilian-medics/
    - Will

    General Performance/Fitness Advice for all

    www.BrinkZone.com

    Performance/Fitness Advice For the Tactical Community

    www.OptimalSWAT.com


    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

  7. #37
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    I think it would be wise to evaluate what techniques and protocols can be used in the civilian sector. Multi-agency mass casualty training would be a good place to propose and discuss changes. Performing drills, then shaking out what does and does not work well will take time and effort, but the idea could be sold to forward thinking people. All entities that would normally respond to a mass casualty and/or tactical incident would have to be involved.

    Time and cost of training is going to be an issue for emergency medical providers. Changes will have to be vetted by attorneys who practice in the medical area. That will be a tough nut to crack and may take more time than we like.
    Train 2 Win

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