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Thread: Legal Considerations for Tactical Medical Responders (Book)

  1. #21
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    Excellent Will thank you for the link. I look forward to reading it and passing it on to administration.

    This is why it is also imperative to work under the license of a medical director as well as be affiliated with a professional agency. All certifications, continuing education hours, P.O.S.T training credits, courses etc need to be accounted for and the position protected by certain state laws that allow "reserve" and/or "auxiliary" officers.

    *Just looked into it. No paper copy? I do not have a Kindle. If he makes a print copy I would order one.
    Last edited by TacMedic556; 04-03-16 at 22:45.

    EMT-B, FFI&II 1999
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    25 years of weapons training and still a student

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by TacMedic556 View Post
    Excellent Will thank you for the link. I look forward to reading it and passing it on to administration.

    This is why it is also imperative to work under the license of a medical director as well as be affiliated with a professional agency. All certifications, continuing education hours, P.O.S.T training credits, courses etc need to be accounted for and the position protected by certain state laws that allow "reserve" and/or "auxiliary" officers.

    *Just looked into it. No paper copy? I do not have a Kindle. If he makes a print copy I would order one.
    There are kindle reader aps for other devices.
    2012 National Zumba Endurance Champion
    الدهون القاع الفتيات لك جعل العالم هزاز جولة الذهاب

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ST911 View Post
    There are kindle reader aps for other devices.
    I don't have another device. My phone is a flip phone. I'm cheap. Sold my ipad a few months back and bought a VLTOR MUR upper.

    EMT-B, FFI&II 1999
    A.A.S. NREMT-Paramedic 2002-Present
    P.O.S.T. SRT/SWAT Medic 2006-Present Decorated with Citation
    TCCC/LETTC/TEMS, PHTLS, PALS, ACLS, IRTB, PRSBI
    Certified QuikClot Instructor, B-CON Instructor
    www.dennyducet.blogspot.com
    http://www.instagram.com/dennyducet
    http://www.steemit.com/@dennyducet
    25 years of weapons training and still a student

  4. #24
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    Different places do it differently.

    My former department's SWAT team had several senior FD firefighter/paramedics volunteer as "Tactical Medics", they would attend all training as well as respond with SWAT on every call out.

    DPD made the headlines a few years back as they employ not just EMTs or Paramedics but they have full blown MD trauma surgeons on their team.





    Doctors in Bulletproof Vests

    Dr. Alex Eastman doesn't lack for excitement in his life. He is a surgeon at Parkland Memorial Hospital, the busiest trauma center in Dallas, meeting the ambulances that carry human bodies wrecked by car accidents, gunshots and the violence of a big city.

    But that's his tame job. Half the week he exchanges his hospital scrubs for a bulletproof vest and heads out with the Dallas SWAT team.


    Having a doctor along can mean the difference between life and death when a cop is shot.

    Police Lt. Carlton Marshall is living proof. Marshall was shot in the neck during a raid Oct. 17.

    Within minutes of hearing "officer down!" Eastman and his partner, Dr. Jeff Metzger, went to work. Metzger held the officer's head while Eastmen performed an emergency tracheotomy, cutting a hole in the officer's neck to allow him to breathe.
    http://abcnews.go.com/WN/story?id=3782762&page=1


    http://www.emsworld.com/news/1040844...-officers-life

    http://gruntdoc.com/2007/10/swat-doc...in-dallas.html
    Last edited by Moose-Knuckle; 11-10-16 at 05:18. Reason: typo
    "In a nut shell, if it ever goes to Civil War, I'm afraid I'll be in the middle 70%, shooting at both sides" — 26 Inf


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  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by TacMedic556 View Post
    Excellent Will thank you for the link. I look forward to reading it and passing it on to administration.

    This is why it is also imperative to work under the license of a medical director as well as be affiliated with a professional agency. All certifications, continuing education hours, P.O.S.T training credits, courses etc need to be accounted for and the position protected by certain state laws that allow "reserve" and/or "auxiliary" officers.

    *Just looked into it. No paper copy? I do not have a Kindle. If he makes a print copy I would order one.
    You don't need a Kindle to read E books. Free app allows you to read on any platform. I read them on my Mac lap top. You'll free app download option on the same page as the book.
    - Will

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    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by TacMedic556 View Post
    I don't have another device. My phone is a flip phone. I'm cheap. Sold my ipad a few months back and bought a VLTOR MUR upper.
    Then what are you typing on right now?!
    - Will

    General Performance/Fitness Advice for all

    www.BrinkZone.com

    Performance/Fitness Advice For the Tactical Community

    www.OptimalSWAT.com


    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillBrink View Post
    Then what are you typing on right now?!
    I will look into one for my main mac and see how it works out. Thanks.

    Moose, indeed many places do it different. The range of professionalism, standards and training varies greatly. I know of a team with two ER physicians that "volunteer" as the medics, however have been through great training and deputized etc.

    I went through rigorous physical and firearms qualifications and was accepted onto the team and sent to basic SWAT (instructed by LAPD SWAT officers) 10 years ago. Over the last decade, while also functioning as a full time professional senior firefighter/paramedic on a transporting department - I have attended 100% of our monthly SWAT trainings (missed one while at bomb school). I have been to several TCCC and LETTC courses paid for by the City. These were not your one or two day powerpoint / stuff some gauze classes. They were a week in duration, instructed by PJs, a Delta individual (CQB portion) and a USAF Trauma Surgeon. Simunition used in a fake town on a military installation served as the backdrop in which we performed operations such as officer down, raids, active shooters, HRT, and so on. Firearms courses have also been a routine portion of our annual training, aside from our normal range days. Our qualification is a 90% minimum passing score on the MEU(SOC) pistol/carbine http://www.imef.marines.mil/Portals/...%203502.1A.pdf There is also annual recertification and training on gas, less lethal and distraction devices, breaching, as well as a myriad of continuing education programs. The professionalism, respect, and commitment to skill and knowledge makes the team I am affiliated with, standout when participating in joint or regional training exercises. I am always proud of our teams reputation.

    Over the ten years of steadfast dedication to my team and community I have become the most senior member on the team. I have helped my community by taking training and doctrines "home" and ushering in the use of tourniquets into civilian medic units, received grants for trauma kits for the high schools and instructed the staff on hemorrhage control, received grants to outfit my team with updated medical equipment, received grants to outfit all police officers in my community with tourniquets and worked to instruct every officer on the usage of, as well as instructed City and County teams on self care/buddy care through a one day course.

    Having someone that has operated in a department that runs nearly 4,000 patient contacts a year for 14 years in pre-hospital emergency experience has been an invaluable asset to my team and community. It has been and continues to be the highest honor and privilege to be able to serve alongside my brothers in blue, and know that they trust me with their lives. This has been my bread and butter since 1999. I graduated high school and went straight into fire academy the next year, obtaining my FFI, FFII and EMT-B. From there I went to college and received a degree in Paramedicine, while pulling grueling hours in a high volume EMS district. In 2002 I gained professional employment on a leading progressive Fire department.

    The tactical medic position is the greatest part of my entire career and likely that which I will look back on with the fondest memories.
    Last edited by TacMedic556; 04-04-16 at 10:27.

    EMT-B, FFI&II 1999
    A.A.S. NREMT-Paramedic 2002-Present
    P.O.S.T. SRT/SWAT Medic 2006-Present Decorated with Citation
    TCCC/LETTC/TEMS, PHTLS, PALS, ACLS, IRTB, PRSBI
    Certified QuikClot Instructor, B-CON Instructor
    www.dennyducet.blogspot.com
    http://www.instagram.com/dennyducet
    http://www.steemit.com/@dennyducet
    25 years of weapons training and still a student

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by TacMedic556 View Post
    I will look into one for my main mac and see how it works out. Thanks.
    Works perfectly well and on my Mac is where I read them. You download the free Kindle reader app. Download the book.Open Kindle App reader. In your Kindle reader library you'll see the book. Open book. Win.
    - Will

    General Performance/Fitness Advice for all

    www.BrinkZone.com

    Performance/Fitness Advice For the Tactical Community

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    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

  9. #29
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    Review - “Legal Considerations for Tactical Medical Responders”

    I downloaded this book shortly after Will posted the link and had it read by late evening. It is short at only ~87 pages, and written in a clear and conversational manner that took me only about 90 minutes to read including interruptions.

    Throughout the text, the author stays on point in the discussion of legal liability for tactical medical responders without any fluff or filler. He moves progressively through the legal aspects of pertinent sub-topics including but not limited to

    -areas of risk, such as civil, criminal, regulatory
    -confidentiality and HIPAA
    -consent, negligence, abandonment
    -norms and standards of care
    -tacmed-specific areas such as evidence, force, detained subjects
    -personnel selection, employee/shared/contractor/volunteer
    -ownership of, and responsibility for personnel and gear
    -public relations and media

    Each sub-topic is covered in a very broad fashion, discussing the most universal and obvious issues and considerations. It does not delve into any specific area, noting the variability of local law and practices. Where lacking depth, the author advises to consult local legislation, regulation, and authorities and follow that guidance. The author is candid about that lack of depth, and there’s no attempt to be a comprehensive analysis. It is footnoted with references to some associated state and federal law, cases, legal and medical definitions for additional reading.

    Having a background in interdisciplinary (LE/EMS) operations, instruction, administration, and tactical medical efforts at different levels puts the text squarely in my lane. There was no new information in the book for me, and similarly situated professionals are likely to have the same view. This text is a quick survey…an expanded, narrative checklist…well suited for LE or EMS managers with little to no exposure to the other’s issues. There is likely more for the LE manager to learn from this book than their EMS counterpart. For a field supervisor or aspiring administrator in either field, this book would be a good birds eye view of how larger programs must deal with many and varied issues. For the line officer/medic or tactical medical responder, this book is a good survey of what they are exposing themselves to and some universally applicable best practices. Also, what they should expect of their agencies and managers.

    The information in this book would make for an informative conference presentation for LE and EMS managers, with the book an accompanying take-home reference.

    I would like to see a larger work developed from this book with more comprehensive analysis of issues, including case studies. However, as noted by the author the "tactical medical responder" concept is still emerging and has not had as much legal review as other risk areas. Instead, perhaps a second edition could offer discussion of successful programs and lessons-learned as exemplars.

    I will add this book to my list of starting references for those considering TMR/TEMS efforts in their area.

    Near it’s conclusion, the book summarizes itself well, thusly. “If you take nothing else from this book, take away this: proper policies and procedures, written by experts and researched to determine the regional standards and then taught by qualifies instructors to your personnel are the best insurance policy you can have against risk.”
    2012 National Zumba Endurance Champion
    الدهون القاع الفتيات لك جعل العالم هزاز جولة الذهاب

  10. #30
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    I had been a NREMTP and a FMF corpsman; to me, tacmed was a no-brainer when I got involved with it (1990ish). I was involved with two teams; neighboring jurisdictions. Each had different requirements for me (in one I was armed; the other not. In one I had CS training; the other not), each had different requirements from our county (the EMS provider) and the medical director.

    I enjoyed it. Almost as much fun as the field time in the military, not nearly the "brotherhood" but that could have been the teams and not indicative of across the TEMS/tacmed spectrum.

    I will say I don't miss the BS....the politics, the "custody fights" between the county, the LE agency, the medical director....

    Also when I started it wasn't a "thing." Aside from the ONE course (CONTOMS) there just wasn't any training. For one agency we had some 18Ds from the Schoolhouse at Bragg come train. Now you can't swing a dead cat for hitting a TEMS/tacmed course.

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