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Thread: Intro to Radio Communications

  1. #51
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    What is the disadvantage to being HAM "Licensed" by the govt?

  2. #52
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    The only disadvantage is that it costs $15.

    Quote Originally Posted by M4Fundi View Post
    What is the disadvantage to being HAM "Licensed" by the govt?

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Outlander Systems View Post
    The only disadvantage is that it costs $15.
    $15!!!!!!! That is like 1/2 a cup of Coffee at Starbucks!!!!!!!!

    In no way do I make any money from anyone related to the firearms industry.


    "I have never heard anyone say after a firefight that I wish that I had not taken so much ammo.", ME

    "Texas can make it without the United States, but the United States can't make it without Texas !", General Sam Houston

  4. #54
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    Yeah with it being that cheap I'm very interested, I'm already studying to be a network technician and I'd like more info on the old school tech as well.

    You can even find full classes for the Technician's license on YouTube.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by CyanLink View Post
    You can even find full classes for the Technician's license on YouTube.
    The thing about ham radio today is that people study, get their license, then (maybe) learn how to operate -- in that order. Unfortunately the majority of newly licensed ham radio operators, never get around to that last step.

    The sequence used to be different a long time ago when you actually had to learn something before getting your license, but now probably about two-thirds of newly licensed hams either never get on the air (because they can't figure out how to program their $30 handheld radio) or lose interest in less than a year (generally because they never found anything to do that couldn't be done easier and better with a cell phone).

    Ham radio can be a hobby or a tool -- as a hobby it's like any other hobby, you generally need to get involved with others before you get much out of it. As a tool, you need to learn how it works. Too many "preppers" see ham radio as a communications tool so they get radios and maybe a license, but they never get the real world knowledge needed to get full use of it.

  6. #56
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    Programming a Baofeng or similar is really easy with a cheap, commonly found cable and the free CHIRP program. You can even use drop down menus to select FRS/GMRS/MURS/Local Amateur Repeaters/Marine frequencies. CHIRP will then just add those into your frequency list. Hit 'Write to Radio' and done. You now have a channelized radio where all you have to do is turn it on, scroll through to whatever channel you want and your good to go.

    If you are looking to use the radio as a tool for SHTF or whatever, then I suspect that is as far as you will take it and that is fine. I did that. 5 years ago. Just this year, just prior to COVID, I got more interested and I got my GMRS license...no test, simple online forms, 70 bucks, and good for 10 years that covers my WHOLE family. I bought a Retevis RT97 repeater and set it up as a remote solar powered mountain side repeater. It gives me coverage with about an 18-25 mile radius of coverage. Now that I have a repeater up that extends the range of the little radios from a few miles to many many times, more friends and family take it seriously. They also got radios and I helped introduce them. I now have a city wide family/friends net that will function here even with the power fails and/or telecommunications overload (like they did during our earthquake).

    Radios are just like anything else. You start somewhere and if it interests you, you will keep getting more and more involved.

    I am gonna get my HAM license here soon just so I can keep experimenting. There is SO SO much out there you can do.

    With my local GMRS network I can talk with people and collect situational intel on just about anywhere I could need it. The major city, its immediate suburbs and the more rural outlying areas about an hour away. Now I am interested in trying to get on HF to communicate statewide/nationwide.

    I would be VERY interested in piggy backing on Mike Glovers "American Contingency" idea which is all about networking and information sharing. Obviously telecommunication/internet should be the primary way to collect and share information but having a back-up net on HF for nation wide comms with local VHF/UHF nets could prove valuable should the telecom infrastructure become damaged/overloaded.

    https://www.americancontingency.com/

    https://www.retevis.com/rt97-portabl...er-uhf/#A9150A
    A9150C-10-_md.jpg

    https://chirp.danplanet.com/projects/chirp/wiki/Home

    https://www.radioddity.com/products/...4aAl69EALw_wcB
    hqdefault.jpg
    Last edited by TomPenguin5145; 08-02-20 at 00:36.

  7. #57
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    Thanks....I was meaning to do this for a while, so today I got my FRN number and applied for the GMRS license on-line, too. Not sure if I will do HAM, but definitely looking into a decent handset + CHIRP.

  8. #58
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    Intro to Radio Communications

    Never mind guess he’s banned.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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