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Thread: Intro to Radio Communications

  1. #51
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    What is the disadvantage to being HAM "Licensed" by the govt?

  2. #52
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    The only disadvantage is that it costs $15.

    Quote Originally Posted by M4Fundi View Post
    What is the disadvantage to being HAM "Licensed" by the govt?

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Outlander Systems View Post
    The only disadvantage is that it costs $15.
    $15!!!!!!! That is like 1/2 a cup of Coffee at Starbucks!!!!!!!!

    In no way do I make any money from anyone related to the firarms industry.


    "I have never heard anyone say after a firefight that I wish that I had not taken so much ammo.", ME

    "Texas can make it without the United States, but the United States can't make it without Texas !", General Sam Houston

  4. #54
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    Yeah with it being that cheap I'm very interested, I'm already studying to be a network technician and I'd like more info on the old school tech as well.

    You can even find full classes for the Technician's license on YouTube.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by CyanLink View Post
    You can even find full classes for the Technician's license on YouTube.
    The thing about ham radio today is that people study, get their license, then (maybe) learn how to operate -- in that order. Unfortunately the majority of newly licensed ham radio operators, never get around to that last step.

    The sequence used to be different a long time ago when you actually had to learn something before getting your license, but now probably about two-thirds of newly licensed hams either never get on the air (because they can't figure out how to program their $30 handheld radio) or lose interest in less than a year (generally because they never found anything to do that couldn't be done easier and better with a cell phone).

    Ham radio can be a hobby or a tool -- as a hobby it's like any other hobby, you generally need to get involved with others before you get much out of it. As a tool, you need to learn how it works. Too many "preppers" see ham radio as a communications tool so they get radios and maybe a license, but they never get the real world knowledge needed to get full use of it.

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