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Thread: Quik Clot Combat Gauze -- is it needed when close to help?

  1. #11
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    Combat Gauze is primarily used for bleeding that cannot be stopped with a TQ. Specifically where the pelvis and legs come together and where shoulder attaches to the torso. I carry 2 packages in my EDC pack (NF Recon that doubles as a school backpack and Daddy day pack). I have 2 TQ's, a 2" and 4" elastic trauma bandage, adult and pediatric NPA, 2 chest seals and tape. The youtube link is from the manufacturer on how to use Combat Gauze. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgu8PtRDY2c
    Tourniquet, nose hose, chest seal, dart!

    In chaos, there is hope!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by D.O.A.F.S. View Post
    Not sure if this is the one Serious Student has but it's a great piece of kit, very well made and thought out. I bought one when first released back in Feb and have wore it everyday since (work, training classes, and matches that I shoot). In fact I like it so much I just bought 2 more, one for my son for his birthday, and one for my other ankle to carry extra shield mags.
    http://www.rykernylongear.com/
    Yup, that is what I have. I also bought one at the initial release, and have been very pleased with it.

    Mine has a package of QC gauze, a SOFTT-W TQ, a set of Hyfin chest seals, NP airway, pair of gloves and a Gerber strap cutter.

    Med kit on right ankle, J-frame on the left ankle.

  3. #13
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    A few days ago there was an attack at an elementary school in South Carolina in which a 6 year old was shot in the leg and subsequently bled to death. Someone with a little training, a tourniquet and/or combat gauze, and the opportunity to use them would likely have saved the boy's life.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by tower59 View Post
    A few days ago there was an attack at an elementary school in South Carolina in which a 6 year old was shot in the leg and subsequently bled to death. Someone with a little training, a tourniquet and/or combat gauze, and the opportunity to use them would likely have saved the boy's life.
    Yes, yes...we could play that "if only..." game in a wide variety of scenarios and a wide variety of tragedies. In the case you mention, it's not clear that a tourniquet and combat gauze applied by an unusually-prepared bystander would have made any difference compared to direct pressure on the femoral artery if we're talking about the time it takes for EMS to arrive from two blocks away. I'm not saying a full-on "blow-out/SHTF/GSW kit is a bad thing for those committed to the perishable skills necessary to be effective a once-in-a-lifetime tragedy such as the one in Townville, I'm just saying that it's largely unproductive to worry about carrying the equipment instead of worrying about understanding the concepts.

  5. #15
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    I have had a rogue gunfighter ankle med kit for 2 years or so and its very comfortable.
    I recently heard they have gone out of business but it is a similar product to the Ryker AFAK and feel it is a great way to carry med supplies on you at all times without loading your pockets with extra stuff.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hmac View Post
    Yes, yes...we could play that "if only..." game in a wide variety of scenarios and a wide variety of tragedies. In the case you mention, it's not clear that a tourniquet and combat gauze applied by an unusually-prepared bystander would have made any difference compared to direct pressure on the femoral artery if we're talking about the time it takes for EMS to arrive from two blocks away. I'm not saying a full-on "blow-out/SHTF/GSW kit is a bad thing for those committed to the perishable skills necessary to be effective a once-in-a-lifetime tragedy such as the one in Townville, I'm just saying that it's largely unproductive to worry about carrying the equipment instead of worrying about understanding the concepts.
    Hmac,

    I know you have your experiences and are a professional in the medical field, but here's a suggestion that you can either ignore or give some thought to. Instead of telling people they don't need something (or don't need to worry or be prepared for something) because they aren't a professional, or may not spend necessary time on a perishable skill (assumption), or statistics say so, or whatever, why don't you help someone get on the right path and gain the knowledge necessary to use such pieces of equipment. Guys wishing to learn and post on here to gain knowlege from those who know, and who are willing to be an asset to society and not a liability, can never be a bad thing nor one that should be dismissed.

    To your point about concepts over gear...yeah I absolutely agree that you need to understand what is being done when you apply a TQ and how you can accomplish the same thing without one. But now you've taken a situation where a TQ could have been applied and now you have someone full time applying pressure to the victim. This CAN BE either inefficient or unsafe depending on the situation.

    I'll take myself as an example, I have very thick muscular thighs and if I get hit in the femoral, I really don't trust myself and certainly not someone else who is probably not as strong as I am to compress that muscle and occlude the artery enough to stop the bleed. And even if you can, now you have to wonder how long they can hold that pressure.

    I won't even get into GSW's here, because I know your stance on that, but what happens if you come across a bad auto accident where there's multiple casualties and only you as the first responder. 2 patients have arterial bleeds and you're the only one capable of administering aid. Wouldn't that TQ (or two) come in handy? Can you not agree that, at the very least, a TQ (if properly applied) can only be an asset and frees up the caregiver to focus on other tasks (whether that's working on other patients, or dealing with a threat, or calling for additional help)?

    And lets be honest, applying a TQ is not rocket science.

  7. #17
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    OP,

    Get a trusted brand of hemostatic (Combat Gauze or other) and get training on how to use it. In a basic sense, CG is to be used where TQ's can't or won't be effective along with junctional pressure to control the bleed (if necessary). They can also be used in conjunction with a TQ, but not necessary if the bleed was stopped by the TQ and you can get to medical help quickly.

    As for training, there's several guys out there teaching combat casualty care and the use of TQ's and hemostatics. The one that I can recommend without question is Dark Angel Medical. They travel around the country, so check them out and see if they have something in your area.
    Last edited by Ironman8; 10-08-16 at 16:23.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ironman8 View Post
    Hmac,

    I know you have your experiences and are a professional in the medical field, but here's a suggestion that you can either ignore or give some thought to. Instead of telling people they don't need something (or don't need to worry or be prepared for something) because they aren't a professional, or may not spend necessary time on a perishable skill (assumption), or statistics say so, or whatever, why don't you help someone get on the right path and gain the knowledge necessary to use such pieces of equipment. Guys wishing to learn and post on here to gain knowlege from those who know, and who are willing to be an asset to society and not a liability, can never be a bad thing nor one that should be dismissed.
    I'm disappointed that you think I don't. I am or have been an ATLS Instructor, a CALS Instructor, a Basic CPR Instructor, an EMT Examiner for the State of Minnesota, and have been an adjunct instructor for at least two Tactical Paramedic courses. The fact that I think that some folks obsess over details, usually the wrong details, or that I don't agree with you, doesn't mean that I'm not committed to making sure that my fellow citizens don't are clueless about dealing with the common emergencies that they might see in everyday life.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hmac View Post
    Yes, yes...we could play that "if only..." game in a wide variety of scenarios and a wide variety of tragedies. In the case you mention, it's not clear that a tourniquet and combat gauze applied by an unusually-prepared bystander would have made any difference compared to direct pressure on the femoral artery if we're talking about the time it takes for EMS to arrive from two blocks away. I'm not saying a full-on "blow-out/SHTF/GSW kit is a bad thing for those committed to the perishable skills necessary to be effective a once-in-a-lifetime tragedy such as the one in Townville, I'm just saying that it's largely unproductive to worry about carrying the equipment instead of worrying about understanding the concepts.
    Do you think a bystander with little or no training would have a better chance of stopping the bleeding from a femoral artery by applying a TQ or direct pressure?

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hmac View Post
    I'm disappointed that you think I don't. I am or have been an ATLS Instructor, a CALS Instructor, a Basic CPR Instructor, an EMT Examiner for the State of Minnesota, and have been an adjunct instructor for at least two Tactical Paramedic courses. The fact that I think that some folks obsess over details, usually the wrong details, or that I don't agree with you, doesn't mean that I'm not committed to making sure that my fellow citizens don't are clueless about dealing with the common emergencies that they might see in everyday life.
    Perhaps I misread you over the course of several of these TCCC related threads. I have no doubt that you do what you do in your profession. I guess it just comes off as if you dismiss the "need" for these tools. I'm a big believer in software first, especially when it comes to this "medical stuff", and I realize not everyone takes that stance...but I wouldn't dismiss the "need" as long as requisit skills are acquired. And again, maybe I'm misreading what you're actually saying.

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