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  1. #1
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    What have you learned about your shooting lately?

    I figured this could be an ongoing discussion about habits that each person is currently trying to learn or unlearn. I don't really see these discussed often unless it relates to a specific piece of gear or course AAR but it may be beneficial to figure out what people are identifying for themselves. For example, my trigger finger discipline with a rifle is usually very good, but I'm bad about mounting my pistol trigger as soon as I draw. I'm trying to fix it so that I'm not on the trigger until my sights are on target. Another big one is fumbled mag reloads. I have a really bad habit of basically quitting and resetting to try again instead of pushing through the fumble and getting the gun back into action. That one reminds me of the stories of police being trained to draw, fire twice, and reholster - and getting killed for it. Any specific things you guys are working on? I always find a few things at a course and sometimes when I force myself to dry fire.


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  2. #2
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    I like to dry fire at a blank white wall to work on rapid sight alignment and trigger control. I also like to practice magazine changes during dry drills and follow up shots until I start to lose focus or until the wife shouts "stop that damn clicking!"

    I fire 250 - 300 rounds during a range session with a handgun, often times more. On the range I like to work on live fire drills where I fire one round, reload, then fire one more round. I'll burn through one box of ammunition, 25 cycles, each range outing. If I fumble the reload or if the magazine hits the deck, I follow through until I send the second round downrange. I've run qualifications where a LEO sent their spare magazine into orbit after removing it from the magazine pouch, grabbed it off the deck with a handful of grass and earth, then completed the reload and fired their shots in the allotted time. Don't stop, don't quit.

    Another drill I like to run is firing series of shots on multiple targets, never the same number of rounds per target or presentation. I will not top off magazines between evolutions and perform a lot of slide lock reloads during practice.

    One important thing I teach my students is not to be in a hurry to holster the weapon after engaging the threat. You un-holster your service pistol in a big, fast hurry to address a threat, but that doesn't mean you need to holster quickly.

    It's good to analyze how you train and how it pertains to a lethal force situation. Analyzing how to improve training evolutions shows a sense of dedication to improving the skill set.
    Last edited by T2C; 12-22-16 at 23:17.
    Train 2 Win

  3. #3
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    I shortfill mags to practice changes under live fire. Throw snap caps in the mix to introduce fail drills.

    Getting equal time on .40/.45 and then going to 9 and working out the overcompensation. It's not like a heavier recoil makes for better control, but just shooting a lot does.
    Last edited by Joelski; 12-23-16 at 10:43.

  4. #4
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    Good info guys

  5. #5
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    To answer the question "What have you learned about your shooting lately?" during each range session I learn that I still have a great deal of room for improvement.
    Train 2 Win

  6. #6
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    I still see good enough at 50+ years old to shoot long guns well with irons sights, and that to get good with the ACOG I'm going to have to practice holding steady better.

  7. #7
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    I learned that I shot my carry and other handguns 4x more than any of my rifles this year. That includes a 750+ round down range week over Thanksgiving with my Tavor. Near me so many places won't allow you to shoot a rifle or carbine at more than one round per second, all standing static. One of my goals next year is to find a place where I can do both, and train my butt off.

    I know I can do plenty of things better, but I am very comfortable and confident that I could carry or use any handgun I own right now, and that makes me happy.
    "There is a savage beast in every man, and when you hand that man a sword or spear and send him forth to war, the beast stirs." -George R.R. Martin, A Storm of Swords

  8. #8
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    I learned over the past year that I have developed a bad habit of pinning the trigger. I have made a conscious effort to avoid that and it has greatly improved my shooting at speed.


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightstalker865 View Post
    I learned over the past year that I have developed a bad habit of pinning the trigger. I have made a conscious effort to avoid that and it has greatly improved my shooting at speed.


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    I'm pretty illiterate to many terms, what exactly is pinning the trigger? if you don't mind
    "There is a savage beast in every man, and when you hand that man a sword or spear and send him forth to war, the beast stirs." -George R.R. Martin, A Storm of Swords

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by WickedWillis View Post
    I'm pretty illiterate to many terms, what exactly is pinning the trigger? if you don't mind
    Holding the trigger to the rear after the shot breaks then slowly riding it out to reset. Doing this slows your follow up shot down because instead of being ready to break the next shot as soon as the sights settle, the shooter is having to wait to get that audible/tactile feedback from the trigger. They then reaffirm sight picture and break the shot. I fell into this habit over the past couple years and have been working at breaking myself of it. In doing so I've noticed a significant increase in accuracy when shooting rapidly, especially on the move.


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