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Thread: What have you learned about your shooting lately?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightstalker865 View Post
    Holding the trigger to the rear after the shot breaks then slowly riding it out to reset. Doing this slows your follow up shot down because instead of being ready to break the next shot as soon as the sights settle, the shooter is having to wait to get that audible/tactile feedback from the trigger. They then reaffirm sight picture and break the shot. I fell into this habit over the past couple years and have been working at breaking myself of it. In doing so I've noticed a significant increase in accuracy when shooting rapidly, especially on the move.


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    Thank you for explaining that. I am very guilty of this as well, sounds like I have another training scar to work on.
    "There is a savage beast in every man, and when you hand that man a sword or spear and send him forth to war, the beast stirs." -George R.R. Martin, A Storm of Swords

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightstalker865 View Post
    Holding the trigger to the rear after the shot breaks then slowly riding it out to reset. Doing this slows your follow up shot down because instead of being ready to break the next shot as soon as the sights settle, the shooter is having to wait to get that audible/tactile feedback from the trigger. They then reaffirm sight picture and break the shot. I fell into this habit over the past couple years and have been working at breaking myself of it. In doing so I've noticed a significant increase in accuracy when shooting rapidly, especially on the move.


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    That is something else I found as well. Because of my slow reset, I end up jerking the trigger quite a bit when shooting faster. Jason pointed it out to me so I'm working on a slow, smooth pull followed by fast reset and take up. Dry firing with this is super important though because I have a light trigger and it takes some time to get a feel for where that wall is when moving quickly.


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    Sic semper tyrannis.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by WickedWillis View Post
    I learned that I shot my carry and other handguns 4x more than any of my rifles this year. That includes a 750+ round down range week over Thanksgiving with my Tavor. Near me so many places won't allow you to shoot a rifle or carbine at more than one round per second, all standing static. One of my goals next year is to find a place where I can do both, and train my butt off.

    I know I can do plenty of things better, but I am very comfortable and confident that I could carry or use any handgun I own right now, and that makes me happy.
    This.

  4. #14
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    The one thing I've learned is that I need to remember what I've learned. What I mean by that is I've paid a lot of money to take classes and I go to the range and I forget to practice the drills and fundamentals they taught me.

  5. #15
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    I try to get the range every day the weather and temp are in my comfort zone - I learned to function in the cold and damp long ago, don't really need the practice.

    Recently, I've been trying to get more from each round fired - for example recently in the garage (dryfire area) I did press outs working the trigger to the target, then a session of slow and deliberate reloads - I find working on speed trigger manipulation during dry drills makes ME sloppy, YMMV; on the range I have stepped back from multiple round drills, e.g. presentation, fire a pair, reload fire a pair, to more single round drills. This extends my range visit, making the daily trip worthwhile, and conserves ammo, which since retirement is on me.

    So as an example the majority of my reloads drills are pressout, fire one, lock back, reload, press on a dummy, immediate action, on target, hold at slack out, recover, reset, repeat. First load is a mag of one, all other mags are one round live with a dummy on top (live, dummy is the way I've always said this, explained in case you don't use same jargon). I'll rep that about 8 times getting only presentation time on the clock; then I'll rep it another 8 to 12 times the same way except moving, focusing on continuing to move during the reload and immediate action ending behind cover; Then I'll do it two reload, two on the move, and get my reload splits on the move. Still ending behind cover.

    When I've completed 50ish rounds, I police brass, put everything in order on that bay, sit down, finish my coffee (my Yeti has let it cool enough to drink by then) or have a diet pepsi. I then move as appropriate to practice an action pistol or GSSF stage with another 50-75 rounds.

    I find I'm on the range about 2 hours with that routine.

    I've never been a fan of 'high round count' just to have the round count, I find I'm better able to focus this way and the whole deal is actually more relaxing.

    Fast follows form.

  6. #16
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    I shoot two handguns...Glock 17 and a 1911

    I've been shooting the Glock primarily for the past three years. Got back to also owning a 1911 recently. What I've learned is that the high grip that I'm used too from drawing the G17 sometimes causes me not to engage the grip safety on the 1911. Occasionally when running a drill in which I draw the 1911 from a holster I'll grip it high enough on the beaver tail that it won't depress the safety sufficiently for the 1911 to fire. If I'm going slow, it's not usually an issue, but when I increase the speed of the draw, that when I get a FTF from the high grip.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightchief View Post
    I shoot two handguns...Glock 17 and a 1911

    I've been shooting the Glock primarily for the past three years. Got back to also owning a 1911 recently. What I've learned is that the high grip that I'm used too from drawing the G17 sometimes causes me not to engage the grip safety on the 1911. Occasionally when running a drill in which I draw the 1911 from a holster I'll grip it high enough on the beaver tail that it won't depress the safety sufficiently for the 1911 to fire. If I'm going slow, it's not usually an issue, but when I increase the speed of the draw, that when I get a FTF from the high grip.
    Does the 1911 have a memory bump on the grip safety?


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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wake27 View Post
    Any specific things you guys are working on? I always find a few things at a course and sometimes when I force myself to dry fire.
    Specific? Beat F2S. It sounds silly, but if I can get to that level I will consider myself learnt. Healthy competition should be encouraged. Who doesn't want to be #1? I noticed that I did not win a single stage despite a podium finish. In fact, some stages I came in as far down as 5th, but I was never at the bottom whether it was single handed pistol, long range rifle, rifle/pistol combination stages.

    I think for me, specifically, I need to step out of the weekend plinker realm and get serious. I've always been a good shooter, but impressing your buddies by blasting out the 10 ring at your local weekend range day is not the same as being a sucker free boss.
    Last edited by Eurodriver; 01-02-17 at 10:22. Reason: Grammar. Trying to add "Sucker free boss" to all my remaining 2016 posts

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wake27 View Post
    Does the 1911 have a memory bump on the grip safety?
    Yes, If this is what I believe you are referring too...

    Attachment 43079

    I really think its the shooter and not the firearm though...still learning
    When I draw the Glock, I grab it really high...What I think is happening, is the same grab of the 1911 is slightly upward, where the grip safey and the frame meet before the flare of the beaver tail and I don't get the safety depressed. When this happens, I don't think my palm makes barely any contact with the "memory bump".

    NC

  10. #20
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    Recently had an opportunity to take my rifles to a small (25 yd) indoor rifle range.

    That trip, I learned if I grab one in a home defense situation, it won't be the f*cking .308




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