Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: Cryotherapy

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    14,395
    Feedback Score
    5 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Hmac View Post
    In my mind, that paper is suspect. Previous studies have not indicated similar results. Additionally, they depend on tracking prescriptions and even then can't get an accurate handle on dosage, and finally, they had no way of accounting for OTC ibuprofen.
    such Epi studies are what they are of course and cause and effect can't be determined from them. Here's a review. It's a tad dated (2010) but extensive. Might be something more recent:

    Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: An Overview of Cardiovascular Risks

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4036661/

    Interestingly, those with pre existing pain and inflammation, NSID's may be protective for CV events, but I have not read the full paper:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27575590

    Seems jury still out on some NSIDs and CV risks, but evidence does seem to be mounting and as you know, other risks exist when using long term.
    - Will

    General Performance/Fitness Advice for all

    www.BrinkZone.com

    Performance/Fitness Advice For the Tactical Community

    www.OptimalSWAT.com


    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    3,162
    Feedback Score
    5 (100%)
    Kind of explains the warnings you get with Advil about a potential increased risk for cardiovascular issues.

    One more reason to try and get more drug free. Not sure if 100% is really feasible unless I take a turn towards liking pain, but I'd like to get down to maybe only needing it after a stressful workout or say legs day... better than every damned day almost.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Posts
    5
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Hmac View Post
    Cryotherapy in its current implementation is in the province of homeopathy - no peer-reviewed or Level 1 evidence of efficacy in amelioration of the process of degenerative arthritis. It's just a theoretically more effective delivery of ice packs. Like RICE, it will temporarily reduce inflammation and swelling while applied. Best suited toward acute inflammation. It won't be helpful for chronic inflammation because that's not an underlying injury that will heal. Likewise won't decrease your reliance on NSAIDS, which is really the only way of managing chronic inflammation, especially from something like degenerative joint disease. As to your back....also true, although you might investigate epidural steroid injections to manage that problem.

    Cryotherapy likely won't hurt you though. I say go for it. The only thing you have to lose is time and money.
    I agree with you in part. Local cryotherapy is usually used for acute injuries, such as sprains / strains, tendinitis, edema, pain or fever after surgery, just by using an cryotherapy machine. At the same time, cold therapy can also slow the inflammatory response by reducing the release of inflammatory mediators. Therefore, it is a physical therapy method that can be used for acute and chronic pain.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    14,395
    Feedback Score
    5 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by MarMark View Post
    I agree with you in part. Local cryotherapy is usually used for acute injuries, such as sprains / strains, tendinitis, edema, pain or fever after surgery, just by using an cryotherapy machine. At the same time, cold therapy can also slow the inflammatory response by reducing the release of inflammatory mediators. Therefore, it is a physical therapy method that can be used for acute and chronic pain.
    It can also hinder your progress in the gym, so per usual, used for acute injuries etc, may may have value, but many do it regularly for general recoup and that may be a bad idea. Also, the entire icing of an injury during the acute phase has been called into question recently, though it's still being debated:

    https://www.cramersportsmed.com/firs...-question.html
    - Will

    General Performance/Fitness Advice for all

    www.BrinkZone.com

    Performance/Fitness Advice For the Tactical Community

    www.OptimalSWAT.com


    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    8,053
    Feedback Score
    4 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by MarMark View Post
    I agree with you in part. Local cryotherapy is usually used for acute injuries, such as sprains / strains, tendinitis, edema, pain or fever after surgery, just by using an cryotherapy machine. At the same time, cold therapy can also slow the inflammatory response by reducing the release of inflammatory mediators. Therefore, it is a physical therapy method that can be used for acute and chronic pain.
    The mind is a powerful thing. If it makes you think that you are feeling better then that's a good thing, right? As long as such homeopathic nostrums aren't used in place of concepts that have level 1 evidence behind their efficacy, and as long as they don't cause any harm, then most doctors that I know would just shrug and say "go for it".

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Posts
    5
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by TAZ View Post
    Anyone have any experience with cryotherapy system? Ive done some reading and it seems like it might could work to alleviate some chronic aches and such due to inflammation. I have a messed up left ankle, no right ACL, banged up left MCL, arthritis in the left knee, couple of compressed disks, torn anterior labrum and a bunch of other smaller injuries from my younger days. All of that means that after exercise I am finding that I need to do more and more icing or popping NSAIDs or both to manage symptoms. I am wondering if something like cryotherapy could help with managing inflammation more efficiently or help minimize the NSAID need. Any words of wisdom are appreciated.
    A study from a trusted source found that cryotherapy significantly reduced pain and was well tolerated in patients with arthritis. In the course of my shoulder recovery, I have recommended this type of physical therapy throughout my life, and I have also done so, which has proven to be effective.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •