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Thread: What To Do With A Busted Garage Door Opener?

  1. #1
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    What To Do With A Busted Garage Door Opener?

    You replace the sprocket shaft bushing then weld the sprocket back onto the shaft. Slap together some brackets to keep it off the ground and then you staple on 10 points.



    I've made quite an assortment of movers but this is my first motorized one. Will have some set up and take down time involved but it'll be neat to have the target coming in and out of cover/No shoots. It's definitely not fast but plenty of No Shoots in the mix will make it interesting.

    Can have it reverse almost anywhere since I'm just using a piece of cardboard clipped to the chain to trip the eyes.

    I started working on a trolley that would support a target frames weight but trashed that and went super light weight on the frame instead.

    Your movers.....I want to see them.

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    That's pretty cool. Would be good for our indoor matches.
    Brian
    IDPA #A22224
    Navy "Lifer" 23 years., the polar opposite of "Operator"

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mx5rcr View Post
    That's pretty cool. Would be good for our indoor matches.
    Thanks. It was surprisingly easy to fab up the parts needed to convert it over. If it burns up I can just buy another opener kit and move my brackets/gizmos over.

    I was worried that I would be stuck using it only where power was available. I've got a small 600 watt /1200 surge inverter that I ran it with today. With a 1/2 HP I'm only surging a little over 700 watts at start up. I'm mobile!

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    What To Do With A Busted Garage Door Opener?

    I like that! I think my dad has an extra one lying around at his house that I may hit him up for!

    But I'm going to need a little more details on exactly what you did. I don't comprehend sprocket shaft blah blah blah. LOL Thanks.
    Last edited by officerX; 04-04-17 at 16:14.

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    Awesome, idea, I see myself setting that up at my up North place, thanks.

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    Way to go McGuyver!

    At further distance would be a challenge, especially if working to keep the rounds in a defined zone, like with an IDPA traget
    * Just Your Average Jewish Redneck *
    Participant in Gun Fighting Training Program
    Civilian Marksmanship Program competitor - M1 Garand, IDPA competitor
    Part-Time Sales at National Firearms Retailer

  7. #7
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    I can't emphasize how simple this was to set up.

    3/4" square tube with 1/4" dowel bipod on pulley side.










    3/4" tube 'cage' bolted to factory hangers. Lower section is a male/female joint with a pin to make install and removal easier. Simple brackets for the eyes.





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    Quote Originally Posted by officerX View Post
    ....

    But I'm going to need a little more details on exactly what you did. I don't comprehend sprocket shaft blah blah blah. LOL Thanks.
    The unit had worn out the chain driveshaft bushing. This cocked the drive sprocket for the chain at an angle putting extra force on the driveshaft. The shaft has an internal shear pin (ground down section) that is designed to break under heavy load. I made a new bushing and welded the shaft back together.

    A new unit, or less worn unit, wouldn't have this problem.

  9. #9
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    What keeps the target upright?
    Last edited by officerX; 04-04-17 at 17:48.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by officerX View Post
    What keeps the target upright?
    Will get a picture tonight but I'm using thin wall tube about 1 1/4" in diameter from a patio umbrella. It too has a male/female joint so that the main portion of the mast is removable. This joint allows one to remove the trolley (part with the pull string/handle that releases a door from the track) from the track if need be.

    At the top of the mast is a simple metal bracket with a target stick lag bolted down. Then the vertical sticks are just screwed to the horizontal stick.

    This keeps it light to minimize wear/tear on the track and motor. The target will slightly leans towards or away from you due to slop in the track but the lean isn't what I would consider excessive.

    I was working on a trolley that ran along the ground with the motor pulling/pushing it. That would make target weight almost a non-issue but the current set up seems to work just fine.

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