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Thread: Realistic AR home defense scenarios--things to think about

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron3 View Post
    Lets say your targeted by four guys and a driver/lookout.

    They do just a little surveillance. Like drive by, learn the cars, the general area, if you have a dog, and where the master bedroom is. (often the last place with lights on at night)

    They decide to attack as you sleep. (instead of say, while your transitioning from work to car or car to home, etc)

    When they think your asleep they drive up and go to the door they want to enter (and have a back up entry plan) Preferably something glass, or perhaps they go though two entrances at once. How much time will there be from the first alarm (security system, your ears, your dogs ears, etc) to when you can observe, orient, and act? (Grab a weapon) They might even be entering the master bedroom itself from outside though a window, french door, or an opening just adjacent. How much time will take them to get to you if your the primary target? 3 seconds? 20 seconds? if they attack your master bedroom it's closer to zero seconds.

    It's not much time. Given this scenario, such a crew would have at least some long guns and very possibly armor. What are your odds? Not good. It's just the reality of such an attack.

    Just something to keep in mind. This plan only requires a BG with an average IQ and no training to consider.

    If it is the local SWAT team with the wrong house they should be good enough to take your place and have you in cuffs literally before you know it. If not, they suck, and will likely get hurt or killed while the home owner is also killed. That's just how that usually goes. (I sure as hell wouldn't throw my hands up just because someone with a gun and a flash light in my house yells, "police!")

    How would you attack your home with a few guys? How about someone you know? Think about it and see what you come up with.
    Already discussed in the above link.

    I actually live in a very safe gated community, so break in's are not a big concern. We have not had a single one in several years.

    I'm more worried about retribution for my career choice. So I would expect 2-4 guys with rifles and/or shotguns. If they are smart the will just hit me with a guage through a window after spotting me through crack in the blinds or something. If they go the smash in the front and back door at the same time route, i'm gonna get 1 or 2 before they hit the kill switch, more if I have time to bleed out.

    Either way, if I'm deliberately targeted I'm a goner, but the cops better find me in a pool of blood and brass.

  2. #22
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    I'm guessing an argument can be made, if they breach your exterior wall, you're already behind the 8 ball. Instead of having enough weaponry to supply a battalion in Fallujah, what about hardening your exterior defenses, so you do have to go on offense? Doors that have a steel beam on the inside of the jam that swing out that won't give to a battering ram, windows that have bars, exterior lights, motion activated cameras etc?

    Granted I don't have any of that, we live where we don't even take keys out of the ignition, I don't think our house doors even have keys. I'm glad I don't live where all that's needed

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  3. #23
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    Realistic AR home defense scenarios--things to think about

    Iím going to share this, itís a little embarrassing but also helps me sleep better at night. I use the cheap alarm sensors from Harbor Freight on all my exterior doors. Iíve had them for over a year and they have worked great. If someone comes through a door at night I will definitely know it. If you canít afford a real alarm system consider giving these a try. Theyíre just a little alarm you stick on each door. A sensor on the door side and the jam side and if they separate the alarm goes off. You have to turn each one on manually (we only have 3 exterior doors all on the same end of the house) It also has a chime if you want. We originally bought these for peace of mind knowing our toddler couldnít sneak out once he started sleeping in his big boy bed. Early on I did have one side of one of the sensors fall off in the middle of the night one night and wow, talk about getting your heart pumping. I jumped out of bed and grabbed my Glock off the shelf in the closet right next to my bed in a split second and stepped into the hall. At the same time my wife grabbed her phone and was in the process of calling 911. In the process of all this I remembered that the sticky pad had come loose earlier that day and I had stuck it back on. Thatís all it was but it felt like the real thing and was a great practice.


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    Last edited by aclawrence; 11-07-17 at 07:33.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclawrence View Post
    I’m going to share this, it’s a little embarrassing but also helps me sleep better at night. I use the cheap alarm sensors from Harbor Freight on all my exterior doors. I’ve had them for over a year and they have worked great. If someone comes through a door at night I will definitely know it. If you can’t afford a real alarm system consider giving these a try. They’re just a little alarm you stick on each door. A sensor on the door side and the jam side and if they separate the alarm goes off. You have to turn each one on manually (we only have 3 exterior doors all on the same end of the house) It also has a chime if you want. We originally bought these for peace of mind knowing our toddler couldn’t sneak out once he started sleeping in his big boy bed. Early on I did have one side of one of the sensors fall off in the middle of the night one night and wow, talk about getting your heart pumping. I jumped out of bed and grabbed my Glock off the shelf in the closet right next to my bed in a split second and stepped into the hall. At the same time my wife grabbed her phone and was in the process of calling 911. In the process of all this I remembered that the sticky pad had come loose earlier that day and I had stuck it back on. That’s all it was but it felt like the real thing and was a great practice.


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    As embarrassing as it can be, it's great advice.

    Sounds like you both sprung into action in that situation, good for you both.

    Practice is always a good situation. Especially working through the adrenaline dump.

  5. #25
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    Yes itís hard to replicate that genuine adrenaline dump. Not something I want to experience too many times.


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  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeriousStudent View Post
    And equally important is a car that is sterile on the inside. How many have a garage door opener in the car, and also an insurance policy, tire warranty or auto repair bill with your name and address in the glove box?

    Bust a window, get the opener and address, and waltz right into the house via the garage door.

    Treat the door from the garage to the home the same as your front door. Garages are not secure in the least.

    Quote Originally Posted by Defaultmp3 View Post
    Why do you want to be quiet? Why are you trying to ambush the intruder, instead of simply hunkering down, calling 911, and holding the door? From what I've been told, singleton room clearing, even in your own home, can be quite difficult; is it really worth all that risk over some property? Movement from your own room will almost certainly be necessary if you have children, yet I don't see much point in being quiet in that, either. Assuming they're altered, they still have the disadvantage in trying to move in unfamiliar territory, possibly without much lights, so I'm not seeing the benefits of being stealthy outside of trying to punch your CONUS kill card.

    Also, consider staging ear pro with your firearm, especially if you have active hearing protection that can arguably improve your hearing.
    My answer would be, because there are kids somewhere else in the house, so I'm going there.

    But with the big dogs and the alarm I shouldn't have to worry about being overly quiet.

    Quote Originally Posted by aclawrence View Post
    I’m going to share this, it’s a little embarrassing but also helps me sleep better at night. I use the cheap alarm sensors from Harbor Freight on all my exterior doors. I’ve had them for over a year and they have worked great. If someone comes through a door at night I will definitely know it. If you can’t afford a real alarm system consider giving these a try. They’re just a little alarm you stick on each door. A sensor on the door side and the jam side and if they separate the alarm goes off. You have to turn each one on manually (we only have 3 exterior doors all on the same end of the house) It also has a chime if you want. We originally bought these for peace of mind knowing our toddler couldn’t sneak out once he started sleeping in his big boy bed. Early on I did have one side of one of the sensors fall off in the middle of the night one night and wow, talk about getting your heart pumping. I jumped out of bed and grabbed my Glock off the shelf in the closet right next to my bed in a split second and stepped into the hall. At the same time my wife grabbed her phone and was in the process of calling 911. In the process of all this I remembered that the sticky pad had come loose earlier that day and I had stuck it back on. That’s all it was but it felt like the real thing and was a great practice.
    Those things are great. I used them years ago when I lived in an apartment.

    And I had the same thing happen. The sticky failed on one side of the alarm that was attached to the living room sliding glass door. Good luck going back to sleep lol



    Related: Those are handy for travel, as are the door stop alarms (put inside hotel room doors along with the usual).
    Last edited by Warp; 11-07-17 at 18:52.
    The Only Thing Necessary for the Triumph of Evil is that Good Men Do Nothing

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeriousStudent View Post
    And equally important is a car that is sterile on the inside. How many have a garage door opener in the car, and also an insurance policy, tire warranty or auto repair bill with your name and address in the glove box?

    Bust a window, get the opener and address, and waltz right into the house via the garage door.
    Way back, I used to work at a grocery store, and it would be normal for workers to leave their belongings in the break room lockers (which almost no one would bring a lock for).

    One day a guy came into the store, walked up to the break room and pulled a purse out of one of the lockers. He used the remote key clicker to press the lock button and find the car in the parking lot. He then drove the car to the worker's address (he had her drivers license with home address in the purse).

    He loaded the car up with as much as he could from the house, and I don't remember whether they found him or not.

    My question is, what do you suggest as far as insurance policies etc in the glove box? I agree that it's a lot of info for someone with bad intentions, but where do you keep it if not in the glove box? I guess one could just carry it everywhere they go.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by w3453l View Post
    Way back, I used to work at a grocery store, and it would be normal for workers to leave their belongings in the break room lockers (which almost no one would bring a lock for).

    One day a guy came into the store, walked up to the break room and pulled a purse out of one of the lockers. He used the remote key clicker to press the lock button and find the car in the parking lot. He then drove the car to the worker's address (he had her drivers license with home address in the purse).

    He loaded the car up with as much as he could from the house, and I don't remember whether they found him or not.

    My question is, what do you suggest as far as insurance policies etc in the glove box? I agree that it's a lot of info for someone with bad intentions, but where do you keep it if not in the glove box? I guess one could just carry it everywhere they go.


    That's a good question. I'm open to suggestions for securing valuables/information that are kept in your vehicle.

    I like having various things in my vehicles since they are often accessible to me and I am only willing/able to carry so much on my person. A little bit of extra cash, maybe an ID card or old drivers license (every now and then I manage to forget my wallet), registration/insurance and the like...

    Though as noted I personally have always treated the door from the garage to the house the same as every other exterior door (though with a garage opener you could attack that door for forced entry without being seen), and would never leave a house key in the car (or under the mat or under a rock or under fake dog doo on the porch)
    The Only Thing Necessary for the Triumph of Evil is that Good Men Do Nothing

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by w3453l View Post
    My question is, what do you suggest as far as insurance policies etc in the glove box? I agree that it's a lot of info for someone with bad intentions, but where do you keep it if not in the glove box? I guess one could just carry it everywhere they go.
    My wife and I scan them and send them to our phones.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Glockster View Post

    And what is a set of realistic scenarios?
    Three most common scenarios to be prepared for:

    1) Break-in at night while in bed.
    2) Home invasion.
    3) Return home to robbers in your house.

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