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Thread: Turning Point for Remington 870

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeriousStudent View Post
    My search fu is mighty today, I found this:

    DECODING REMINGTON SERIAL NUMBERS
    Model 870 LETTER PREFIX
    1950 TO APPROX 1968: NO SERIAL NUMBER PREFIX
    1968 TO PRESENT: LETTERS USED (IN SEQUENCE)
    S-68, T-74, V-78, W-84, X-90, A-91, B-94, C-97, D-01, AB-05

    Model 870 LETTER SUFFIX (DESIGNATES GAUGE)
    V 12 GA. (2 3/4”)
    M 12 GA. MAGNUM (3”)
    A 12 GA. “SUPER” MAGNUM (3 ½”)
    W 16 GA. ( 2 ¾” )
    X 20 GA. “HEAVY FRAME” (DISCONTINUED)
    N 20 GA. “HEAVY FRAME MAGNUM” (DISCONTINUED)
    K 20 GA. “LIGHT WEIGHT” (“LW”) (ALSO INCLUDES M/1100 “LT”)
    U 20 GA. LW MAGNUM (ALSO INCLUDES M/1100 “LT”)
    J 28 GA.
    H .410 BORE (2 ½” OR 3”)

    Model 1100 LETTER PREFIX
    1963 TO APPROX. 1968: NO SERIAL NUMBER PREFIX
    1968 TO PRESENT: LETTERS USED (IN SEQUENCE)
    L-68, M-74, N-78, P-85, R-90

    Model 1100 LETTER SUFFIX
    SAME STRUCTURE AS THE Model 870

    Model 1187 LETTER PREFIX
    1987 TO PRESENT: “PC” 12 GA., 1999 “TL“ 20 GA.,
    2000 “SM” SUPER MAG.

    LETTER SUFFIX
    NO LETTER SUFFIX ON THIS MODEL

    Then look on the left side of the barrel near the receiver and look for a two letter date code stamp and follow this chart with the first letter being the month and the second being the year the barrel was made;
    Month
    B - Jan L - Feb A - Mar C - Apr K - May P - Jun
    O - Jul W - Aug D - Sep E - Oct R - Nov X - Dec

    Year
    M - 1921 N - 1922 P - 1923 R - 1924 S - 1925
    T - 1926 U - 1927 W - 1928 X - 1929 Y - 1930
    Z - 1931 A - 1932 B - 1933 C - 1934 D - 1935
    E - 1936 F - 1937 G - 1938 H - 1939 J - 1940
    K - 1941 L - 1942 MM - 1943 NN - 1944 PP - 1945
    RR - 1946 SS - 1947 TT - 1948 UU - 1949 WW - 1950
    XX - 1951 YY - 1952 ZZ - 1953 A - 1954 B - 1955
    C - 1956 D - 1957 E - 1958 F - 1959 G - 1960
    H - 1961 J - 1962 K - 1963 L - 1964 M - 1965
    N - 1966 P - 1967 R - 1968 S - 1969 T - 1970
    U - 1971 W - 1972 X - 1973 Y - 1974 Z - 1975
    I - 1976 O - 1977 Q - 1978 V - 1979 A - 1980
    B - 1981 C - 1982 D - 1983 E - 1984 F - 1985
    G - 1986 H - 1987 I - 1988 J - 1989 K - 1990
    L - 1991 M - 1992 N - 1993 O - 1994 P - 1995
    Q - 1996 R - 1997 S - 1998 T - 1999 (*) U - 2000 (*)
    V - 2001 (*) W - 2002 X - 2003 Y - 2004 Z - 2005
    A - 2006 B - 2007 C - 2008 D - 2009 E - 2010
    F - 2011 G - 2012 H - 2013



    And this:


    http://www.rem870.com/2012/01/19/rem...number-lookup/
    I'm bumping this one up because I have an 870 that was a new model for 2009 (gunmetal grey powercoated Tactical, that finish was complete and utter shit BTW, it literally peeled off in sheets), with an AB serial number prefix, and the barrel has a June 1994 date code.

    Just to highlight why using the two letter barrel date code is not a really good idea when dating when the gun was made.


    As to the fact that Battlefield Las Vegas claims the 870 has a short lifespan because a known wear part (ejector spring) wears and breaks after many thousands of rounds, don't even bother trying to replace (or have a gunsmith replace) that known wear part, and simply scraps that 870 and goes around calling the 870 a consumable... that's just beyond retarded honestly. Do we scrap an AR15 every time an extractor or cam pin wears out?

    That 2009 870 I have broke the ejector spring after well over 10 000 rounds last year or the year before, the spring wore down at the ejecting claw that rubs on the bolt and finally broke when there wasn't enough metal left to keep it rigid. When that happenned, I took some cable cutters, snapped the spring off in half, tucked the remaining riveted part in the ejector cavity, and the gun ejects fine without the spring...
    Last edited by Artiz; 12-03-18 at 13:58.

  2. #42
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    "Do we scrap an AR15 every time an extractor or cam pin wears out? "

    No, but replacing those doesn't involve

    (1) working with rivets
    (2) spending time working with said rivets on a Remington POS

    I think they have a good handle on what repairs are economical for them. For an individual user with tons of free time - especially a broker user - doing the work makes more sense.

    However, they're probably saying the 870 has a short lifespan because they're comparing them to various Benelli models.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by boltcatch View Post
    "Do we scrap an AR15 every time an extractor or cam pin wears out? "

    No, but replacing those doesn't involve

    (1) working with rivets
    (2) spending time working with said rivets on a Remington POS

    I think they have a good handle on what repairs are economical for them. For an individual user with tons of free time - especially a broker user - doing the work makes more sense.

    However, they're probably saying the 870 has a short lifespan because they're comparing them to various Benelli models.
    If you know what you are doing 5 minutes for the spring, without replacing the rivet - probably 15 for me because I have to find the rivet cutter and walk to the drill press.

    https://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-t...r-prod368.aspx

    The ejector requires a little more time, probably less than a half hour. This involves removing and replacing the rivets along with the ejector and spring. This is without milling the rivets flush and re-doing the receiver's finish -which isn't necessary on a police/combat shotgun with a side saddle.

    Remington doesn't teach this any longer in their factory armorer courses, but it is easy to get them working again - as long as you aren't demanding the receiver be refinished.

    I don't know what Battlefield Vegas pays their armorers, but I'd be willing to bet it isn't enough that it is cost effective for them to replace a shotgun, versus an armorer spending less than an hour overhauling it.
    "If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said a faster horse." - Henry Ford

    “You are responsible for your actions, but the world doesn’t turn around you, so it’s important that you find something bigger than yourself to work for, a way for you to make a difference.” - Drew Dix, MOH VN '68

  4. #44
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    A relative and I went to a sporting goods store so she could purchase a home defense gun. She got a new in box Express 20 gauge. When we got it home, racking the slide a few times locked up the action tight. We took it back. The sales person took another one out of a box. Racking the slide on that one promptly locked up the action. We got a refund.

    I understand that the police models are still built to the spec. I will never part with my old Wingmaster. Express is junk.

  5. #45
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    There are too many police trade in 870 Police Magnums at reasonable prices to mess with buying a new one. I was in GT Distributors awhile back and they had 10 Police Magnums with Speed Feed stocks in the rack and they were $189. Why would you buy a new one?
    "When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own house, his possessions are safe." Luke 11:21

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