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Thread: Flinching with both pistol and rifle

  1. #11
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    Dry fire practice drills is what you seek.

  2. #12
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    I agree with what’s been shared. Ear plugs with muffs, and lots of dry fire practice with a dime on the muzzle.

  3. #13
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    Ball and dummy drills....
    " I can't walk with gum in my mouth...It makes it to where I can't breathe"-The Wife Unit

  4. #14
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    Whether it be with a rifle or a pistol, focus on pulling the trigger SLOWLY and SMOOTHLY. Think of yourself as ROLLING the trigger back. Also, focus on pulling the trigger back as STRAIGHT BACK as you possibly can. These things sound small, but they can make a huge impact on your accuracy.

    Do dry fire practice pulling the trigger in this way...just like 10 proper pulls a day, and then apply it at the range. Your flinching should go away, and your accuracy should be pretty solid.
    - Michael C.
    (hotlinks in signature lines are prohibited - stop bumping old threads to promote your website)

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by MisterHelix View Post
    Here's my suggestion. It sounds kinda silly, but it worked for me.

    Get yourself a .22, and put a couple thousand rounds down range with it. Then when you go to shoot your center fire rifle or pistol, pretend it's a .22.

    I know it sounds silly, but doing that, (or alternatively muttering to yourself that "the recoil cannot hurt me") works.

    I don’t flinch, I over anticipate recoil..... I’ve gotten to shooting a lot more 22, in rifle and handgun. I used to do more dry firing, but haven’t much lately- but I think I’ll go back to more. To me the are like building blocks.

    That, and with my son I tried to get him to not do fake recoil when he was playing guns around the house with - Pew-pew with a finger or an unloaded nerf gun. Why use all that trigger time and build bad habits?

    With my son and I both shooting now, blowing thru 9 and 556 gets expensive. A couple of hundred rounds of 22 helps to soften the blow a bit.

    I also try to focus not on the recoil, but getting the sight picture/dot back.
    I just did two lines of powdered wig powder, cranked up some Lee Greenwood, and recited the BoR. - Outlander Systems

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  6. #16
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    All the advice on dryfiring, double ear protection, ball-and-dummy drills is excellent, but there is one additional "mental" tweak to add.

    When you take up the trigger slop or first stage, and are about to break the shot, think about adding half the pressure required - not all of it at once - and then another half of what's left, and again, until the shot breaks.

    The guy who told me this says that by trying to not fire the shot, your body will not be anticipating recoil or trying to 'get it over with' - and will remain stationary.

    As long as you are only trying to add half as much pressure as it would take to break the shot, over and over, until it breaks "unintentionally" you will not have a chance to twitch and screw it up. Clearly your shooting is intentional, you're trying to put the round into the X-ring or you wouldn't be on the firing line, but if your mind thinks "Now!" all sorts of movements follow, throwing the shot out into the 8 ring or worse.

    Geez when I decide to post this I was sure I could say it clearly, now not so sure...

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Professor Gascan View Post
    Greetings all, long time lurker infrequent poster. I just recently joined my local range and have been shooting quite a bit. I've noticed that I can flinch from time to time with a handgun, at least 1 shot out of every magazine will be a good bit lower than the group.


    With a rifle it's a different kind of flinch. If I try to shoot with just one eye I'l blink hard before the shot, but if I shoot with both eyes open it doesn't happen at all. It's not a big deal, and I can shoot both eyes open with a red dot out to 200yds without focus problems. But past 100 with open sights it's hard to focus(20/20 vision) on the front sight with both eyes open, I see it fine with just my dominant eye up until the point I pull the trigger, but then I flinch.


    Any tips, tricks, or drills, to help this or is it just something that diminishes with trigger time and rounds down range? TIA

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