G&R Tactical
Page 1 of 9 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 86

Thread: Narcan (Naloxone) Training

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Oh, Dah Nord Minnersoda.
    Posts
    1,270
    Feedback Score
    4 (100%)

    Narcan (Naloxone) Training

    Just received Narcan certification yesterday and they passed out Naloxone kits (two per person).

    This was all in a grant to help fight the Opioid Overdoses and help better the communities.

    Minnesota has had a standing order for Naloxone since 2015. So, it's available to anyone at a Pharmacy.

    I really think this is a great addition to my car bag. It comes with a bioshield for rescue breathing / CPR.

    I am BLS - Healthcare Professional Certified and felt like this free training was stupid NOT to get. Everything was free. It was easy.

    This isn't the exact kit I got, but the closest I could find to make it easy on me.


    Soooo, my question:

    Does this type of thing propagate the abuse and usage of Narcotics, specifically, Opioids?

    The reason I ask, is that was one person's rhetoric during the evening was very, blatantly, anti the rescue program. I mean, I get it. I don't like my tax dollars being used on the "War On Drugs" either, but it appears Naloxone, in the grand scale, is actually very useful for many cases of drug overdoses, even prescribed.

    Nonetheless, with all the stupid mofos driving around booting, shooting, snorting, and more while driving and in public, I added this to my daily grab bag. Added a couple bandages and a trauma pad to the kit to make it that much better for my uses.

    What say you? Viable training that any "Concerned Community Member" should do? Or, the program is enabling and dangerous as is? Waste of tax dollars/grant monies? I am interested in your opinions as I had no idea this training existed until last night before my wife and I signed up.

    As a prepper, I love having this stuff on hand. As a realist, I am hoping that my statistical need for this stays extremely low and it expires from non usage.
    Last edited by HeruMew; 12-01-17 at 08:20.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Barre, VT
    Posts
    7,122
    Feedback Score
    94 (100%)
    Our kits look easier to use. Open package, remove tip and push. Looks more like a nasal spray. I'm glad we have them too.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    "Real men have always needed to know what time it is so they are at the airfield on time, pumping rounds into savages at the right time, etc. Being able to see such in the dark while light weights were comfy in bed without using a light required luminous material." -Originally Posted by ramairthree

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Posts
    3,412
    Feedback Score
    19 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by HeruMew View Post
    Just received Narcan certification yesterday and they passed out Naloxone kits (two per person).

    This was all in a grant to help fight the Opioid Overdoses and help better the communities.

    Minnesota has had a standing order for Naloxone since 2015. So, it's available to anyone at a Pharmacy.

    I really think this is a great addition to my car bag. It comes with a bioshield for rescue breathing / CPR.

    I am BLS - Healthcare Professional Certified and felt like this free training was stupid NOT to get. Everything was free. It was easy.

    This isn't the exact kit I got, but the closest I could find to make it easy on me.

    Soooo, my question:

    Does this type of thing propagate the abuse and usage of Narcotics, specifically, Opioids?

    The reason I ask, is that was one person's rhetoric during the evening was very, blatantly, anti the rescue program. I mean, I get it. I don't like my tax dollars being used on the "War On Drugs" either, but it appears Naloxone, in the grand scale, is actually very useful for many cases of drug overdoses, even prescribed.

    Nonetheless, with all the stupid mofos driving around booting, shooting, snorting, and more while driving and in public, I added this to my daily grab bag. Added a couple bandages and a trauma pad to the kit to make it that much better for my uses.

    What say you? Viable training that any "Concerned Community Member" should do? Or, the program is enabling and dangerous as is? Waste of tax dollars/grant monies? I am interested in your opinions as I had no idea this training existed until last night before my wife and I signed up.

    As a prepper, I love having this stuff on hand. As a realist, I am hoping that my statistical need for this stays extremely low and it expires from non usage.
    Does this type of thing propagate abuse? I think 'yes,' but I don't know what the data say. My guess is a user will use whether narcan is thing or not.

    Am I going to add it to my bag? Nah, bruh. I am still too crispy over dealing with these people in EMS and in the ED. If I see them lying in a pool of their vomit and piss barely or not breathing, I will do the 'responsible citizen' thing and call 911 and move along.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    1,532
    Feedback Score
    40 (100%)
    A few weeks ago, I worked an accidental opioid OD on a diabetic who recently had back surgery. Took his insulin before breakfast, took his prescribed oxycodone, and subsequently went down from either being hypoglycemic or the opioids. Chicken or egg; but with pinpoint pupils, resp @ 6/min, and BGL 26, who cares. Regardless, he took a full 2.0mg plus another 0.4mg narcan IV to effect a change in respirations. The D50 that came after got him “back”.

    That is the only legitimate accidental OD I’ve worked, but have heard of a few others from my coworkers. Particularly due to polypharmacy with elderly patients.

    As for the street drug kind? On the clock and off are two different things. I’m with chuckman in that on my own time, an OD is not my emergency and I’m not going to make it one. Call 911, put them in the recovery position, and let Jesus take the wheel while I go about my day.

    Junkies will get their fix regardless if narcan is available.
    Last edited by GTF425; 12-01-17 at 09:06.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Oh, Dah Nord Minnersoda.
    Posts
    1,270
    Feedback Score
    4 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by usmcvet View Post
    Our kits look easier to use. Open package, remove tip and push. Looks more like a nasal spray. I'm glad we have them too.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    They showed us 4 different kinds. The Ezvio Auto-Injector looks the easiest, but is about 345 dollars unless I use my insurance, than it's free... And, not doing that for something random. The FDA approved snap-packs look so simple. Those are about 40, but are free at many times and places across our area.

    The vials/needles are by far the cheapest, but hardest to administer for most, plus I would rather not deal with anything close to an addict's veins/blood as a non-medical professional. The luer-lock is easy, but in a rush could be hard. But, I have a good feeling I could use it effectively at this point.

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckman View Post
    Does this type of thing propagate abuse? I think 'yes,' but I don't know what the data say. My guess is a user will use whether narcan is thing or not.

    Am I going to add it to my bag? Nah, bruh. I am still too crispy over dealing with these people in EMS and in the ED. If I see them lying in a pool of their vomit and piss barely or not breathing, I will do the 'responsible citizen' thing and call 911 and move along.
    I can understand that. I suppose I am in a bit of a privileged spot to not have to encounter situations and people like that often. I know that I wouldn't put myself in danger for someone in that situation; but never know what I might run into out there.

    Quote Originally Posted by GTF425 View Post
    A few weeks ago, I worked an accidental opioid OD on a diabetic who recently had back surgery. Took his insulin before breakfast, took his prescribed oxycodone, and subsequently went down from either being hypoglycemic or the opioids. Chicken or egg; but with pinpoint pupils, resp @ 6/min, and BGL 26, who cares. Regardless, he took a full 2.0mg plus another 0.4mg narcan IV to effect a change in respirations. The D50 that came after got him “back”.

    That is the only legitimate accidental OD I’ve worked, but have heard of a few others from my coworkers. Particularly due to polypharmacy with elderly patients.

    As for the street drug kind? On the clock and off are two different things. I’m with chuckman in that on my own time, an OD is not my emergency and I’m not going to make it one. Call 911, put them in the recovery position, and let Jesus take the wheel while I go about my day.

    Junkies will get their fix regardless if narcan is available.
    That was my biggest concern. Percentage wise, statistically, I figured legitimate situations due to prescribed are on the very rare side of things, while ODs due to abuse are the main reason for this being in Standing Order.

    Thanks for all your feedback. The input and conversation is very much appreciated.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Lowcountry, SC.
    Posts
    1,621
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)
    In my area, Iím a bigger fan of cops, first responders, and firefighters that know how to properly use a BVM. Not that Iím knocking naloxone, I just see a lot of people not able to do basic stuff. I have seen Narcan administered inappropriately a few times FWIW.

    The nasal (MAD) setup is the way I would reccomend.

    Eff treating junkies off duty.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    15
    Feedback Score
    0
    I agree. I have only worked a handful of actual accidental ODís. I donít call shooting smack accidental by the way.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    52
    Feedback Score
    0
    Having just gone through our refresher, make sure your partners can use it on you. A lot of these opioids absorb through the skin, which is no bueno. Make sure you've got good gloves too.

    Having at least two people there when you push it is a must (my policy requires it). If you give too much they'll come up swinging. Our paramedics usually give enough to save them but they're usually at the border of conscious and unconscious to avoid combativeness.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    1,532
    Feedback Score
    40 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Budget View Post
    Our paramedics usually give enough to save them but they're usually at the border of conscious and unconscious to avoid combativeness.
    Absolutely.

    Titrate dose to respiratory effort, not LOC. “Sleepy and breathing” is the goal.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    769
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by 1168 View Post
    In my area, I’m a bigger fan of cops, first responders, and firefighters that know how to properly use a BVM. Not that I’m knocking naloxone, I just see a lot of people not able to do basic stuff. I have seen Narcan administered inappropriately a few times FWIW.

    The nasal (MAD) setup is the way I would reccomend.

    Eff treating junkies off duty.
    ^
    This.

    The proper answer to “not breathing” is airway adjunct and BVM. BLS before ALS. If opioids are t the problem you haven’t helped anyone.
    Former LEO (12 years)
    Paramedic
    B-TOMS
    TCCC
    TECC

Page 1 of 9 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •