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Thread: What axe are you folks using?

  1. #31
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    Wow, surprising to me how many guys have axes. They are an important tool to me as I heat with wood. All of mine are probably at least seventy years old, all are what I consider to be family heirlooms (except the handle-less one I found in the middle of the road recently).

    I grew up using axes and the first time I needed a new handle I was shocked to learn the awful truth-- curved handles and double-bit axes are no longer done and I still am not sure if that was a family thing or something that fell from favor but ever double bit axe I have or have used has a curved handle. It make so much sense: one side is for roots or anything else that might tend to dull the edge-- a piece of barbed wire grown into a log or what have you. You can easily tell by the feel of the handle which edge you're using and actually switch to one or the other on the back swing. So, the one edge is kept max sharp for best cutting.

    When I broke a handle a few years ago it was such a surprise to find they don't make these and then I did remember Dad re-handling one maybe 15 years ago and he had to modify the curved handle to fit the eye of a double bit axe. Anyway it is a most worthwhile axe format. I have a few single-bit axes but seldom use them. The hammer side is not something I ever need but a second edge is something I often need.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ned Christiansen View Post
    Wow, surprising to me how many guys have axes. They are an important tool to me as I heat with wood. All of mine are probably at least seventy years old, all are what I consider to be family heirlooms (except the handle-less one I found in the middle of the road recently).

    I grew up using axes and the first time I needed a new handle I was shocked to learn the awful truth-- curved handles and double-bit axes are no longer done and I still am not sure if that was a family thing or something that fell from favor but ever double bit axe I have or have used has a curved handle. It make so much sense: one side is for roots or anything else that might tend to dull the edge-- a piece of barbed wire grown into a log or what have you. You can easily tell by the feel of the handle which edge you're using and actually switch to one or the other on the back swing. So, the one edge is kept max sharp for best cutting.

    When I broke a handle a few years ago it was such a surprise to find they don't make these and then I did remember Dad re-handling one maybe 15 years ago and he had to modify the curved handle to fit the eye of a double bit axe. Anyway it is a most worthwhile axe format. I have aw single-bit axes but seldom use them. The hammer side is not something I ever need but a second edge is something I often need.
    All the double bit axes I've seen have a straight handle. I can see where a curved one with a dedicated bit-side would be advantageous. In my youth we used wood heat as did most in the community. I busted up many a cord of wood back then. I sure miss the heat from a wood fire today.
    I expend tremendous amounts of energy and time merely to be normal.

  3. #33
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    untitled.jpg
    I find I use the Gransfors Scandinavian Forest Axe the most, especially at work. The one in the pic is a new replacement for one that was stolen from my ruck. That Council Hudson Bay I picked up on an impulse when buying some bar chain oil. Not shown is a Husqvarna Multipurpose that's in my locker at work and a couple of old heads (Plumb and Collins) that I need to hang. My next purchase will probably be a Gransfors Splitting Maul.

    Oh, here's the Snow & Nealley the command got each of us for Christmas:
    christmas present.jpg
    Last edited by Tortuga; 01-03-18 at 17:44.

  4. #34
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    Man, lots of good info in this thread.

    So where do you gents recommend getting a good hickory handle for a hatchet or axe? I spotted this fellow on ebay:

    http://stores.ebay.com/Hickory-Handl...p2047675.l2563

    Anyone else have someone they recommend?

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeriousStudent View Post
    Man, lots of good info in this thread.

    So where do you gents recommend getting a good hickory handle for a hatchet or axe? I spotted this fellow on ebay:

    http://stores.ebay.com/Hickory-Handl...p2047675.l2563

    Anyone else have someone they recommend?
    They are good to go. I mentioned them in my my post above. House Handle is also good to go - https://www.househandle.com/. Make sure you put in the notes you want the handles unfinished.

  6. #36
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    Ah, thank you very much, I missed that. I'll check out House Handle as well.

    Do you just use linseed or tung oil on the handles? Any advice you can offer there?

    And truly, there is something very satisfying about restoring an old tool to working order, and passing it onto the kids or grandkids.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeriousStudent View Post
    Ah, thank you very much, I missed that. I'll check out House Handle as well.

    Do you just use linseed or tung oil on the handles? Any advice you can offer there?

    And truly, there is something very satisfying about restoring an old tool to working order, and passing it onto the kids or grandkids.
    I like boiled linseed oil. The hickory handle on my council tools hudson bay took about 6 or 7 coats before it stopped soaking in, but it sure looks and feels good. You're exactly right about old tools. I picked up a single bit at the flea market from an old gentleman who had done an excellent job on the re-handling. It just looked and felt good in the hands.
    I expend tremendous amounts of energy and time merely to be normal.

  8. #38
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    Anyone know the best way to make a handle collar or handle guard? Leather, rubber, etc? Anyone ever made one of these? Please teach us (me) how!
    I expend tremendous amounts of energy and time merely to be normal.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeriousStudent View Post
    Ah, thank you very much, I missed that. I'll check out House Handle as well.

    Do you just use linseed or tung oil on the handles? Any advice you can offer there?

    And truly, there is something very satisfying about restoring an old tool to working order, and passing it onto the kids or grandkids.
    Yep - I use boiled linseed oil. 4 or 5 coats on a new handle and then a few coats in the fall and again in the spring. If you store your axes inside let them sit out overnight to let the handles pull moisture from the air before you use them.

    If your on facebook checkout the group axe junkies. Lots of good info there.

  10. #40
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    I like to use pure raw linseed (flax seed) oil. Great results without the rest of the nasty chemicals, penetrates and works fine without them. Added plus, It is also great for seasoning cast iron cookware.

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