G&R Tactical
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Results 61 to 67 of 67

Thread: Injured by a ND, Wanted to Share Thoughts

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    363
    Feedback Score
    0
    Dionysusigma, first and foremost I just want to say that as serious as this was, I'm very glad it wasn't any worse. Before I forget, I wish you a speedy recovery and one that comes as close to full restoration of mobility as possible.

    Thank you for having the courage to share this with all of us. It is no small step for a man to admit a mistake of that magnitude. As many have already said, NDs aren't as rare as they definitely should be. I won't bore everyone with the details but I'll admit I've had one. The important part in my case was that no one was injured and the only thing that was damaged was my pride, some sheetrock, some exterior siding and one board on the deck in my backyard. Oh, and my hearing. Suffice to say, no one wants to know what 5.56 sounds like in a 10'x12' room. If you do want to know, don't find out for yourself just ask me.

    I have to say that I agree with Mistwolf. There isn't a need to create more rules regarding safe gun handling. Just follow the established ones. They really do work. NDs don't happen because we forget what can happen or because of distraction alone. They happen because we stop actually thinking about what we are doing. Many of us here can literally field strip and reassemble an AR in zero light conditions by sense of touch alone. It can seem like doing it without thinking about it, but it really takes a great deal of concentration and thinking about each step. It's not really difficult. It just requires familiarity and focus.
    ~Rightful liberty is unobstructed action according to our will within limits drawn around us by the equal rights of others. I do not add 'within the limits of the law' because law is often but the tyrant's will, and always so when it violates the rights of the individual.
    Thomas Jefferson

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    366
    Feedback Score
    5 (100%)
    Much respect for sharing.

    It may prevent someone else from making the same mistake.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    860
    Feedback Score
    1 (100%)
    Update (apologies for the delay):

    Had more xrays done on Feb 21st (one month after the event), though to my untrained eye they still look about the same. Seems a lot of the pain from the area was from swelling extending into the bone itself, what with marrow displacement into the muscle and all, but that's subsided. The exit wound finally stopped draining and sealed over after about three weeks, taking a lot longer than I expected. The detached, 90-degree-rotated fragments are still in there, and I can feel them if I prod at the skin lightly, since there's not much between the shin bone and surface. Kinda weird. Got cleared for "limited weight bearing," and had been managing with my grandfather's cane instead of a full leg brace and crutches.

    The majority of pain now comes from between my calf and ankle, but around the entirety of the leg (not just the back). Specifically, the tendons and smaller muscles that control balance and movement of the foot itself. There will be times when the whole lower leg aches something fierce for about half an hour, but goes away with just sitting and non use - I remember hearing something about wound channel healing and having to rebuild/redirect blood vessels after trauma, which makes sense if blood can go down, but has trouble coming back up. Moderate swelling (sometimes a little discoloration) appears and dissipates concurrently with the pain, but nothing worrisome.

    As the next couple of days passed, driven by the past month's boredom and disability, I got bolder with pushing my limits. The disused exercycle in the garage, shocked at having someone try it out again, became a regular fixture as I'd spend five, then ten, then twenty minutes on it at a time, distracting myself with mobile games and articles. The cane became less and less of a necessity, now mostly used in the first hour of the morning. Recovery time decreased steadily, and gave driving a shot yesterday afternoon, and felt just fine after casually cruising around town for an hour as my dad's chauffeur. I finally faced my biggest apprehension last night: stairs. Going slowly, one step at a time and using the rail, I managed a complete descent and ascent to/from the basement, which admittedly kicked my rear end, but felt... empowering? to do.

    I'm not at 100% just yet, probably not even 80%, but am self-sufficient to the point I'm certain I could go grocery shopping without any big worries. I'm still a bit wobbly when I stand up, but with my boots on (and the ankle support they inherently provide), that passes quickly. I plan to return to light duty next week, probably just ordering parts and filling out paperwork, until I'm cleared by the base's medical personnel - and I haven't a clue how long that will be. I actually miss it, and having income again will of course be appreciated. My supervisor even joked a few times "so I heard you've got a .45 for sale!" when I'd update him on my progress, but I offered him my custom P220 - there's no way in heck I'd sell my USP Expert I don't really shoot the Sig anymore, and it'd take the edge off my medical bills, so no biggie for me.

    There's a lot I've learned from all this - Safety and safe handling, obviously; initial stabilization and first aid; the importance of communication, and highly-trained and well-disciplined medical personnel; what even an FMJ is capable of, wound-wise, from first-hand experience; that wound healing (including bone) is the easy part of recovery, and learning to walk and muscle rebuilding/use is the longer, more painful aspect; and while all this is going on even simple tasks like getting food and... hygienic activities are stupidly difficult.

    I got damn lucky in almost every way - wound location, services available, support from family and friends, occupational resources, financial stability to cover some costs and good insurance to cover the rest, and am healing quickly on top of that. And of course, if I'd simply followed the Four Rules, and complied with safe clearing procedures, none of this would have happened!

    All in all, an illuminating experience, but not one that I'd ever recommend.
    Sent from the future using Squid Telepathy

    Quote Originally Posted by MistWolf View Post
    If we could control all the variables, we'd just put all the bad luck on our enemies and stay home.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    860
    Feedback Score
    1 (100%)
    Epilogue:

    Finally back home. After getting settled in, I did a little amateur ballistics calculation and was able to find the bullet - apparently I had slowed it enough that it penetrated the carpet and pad, but deflected away when it hit the hardwood floor beneath, causing no damage to the wood. After digging it out with a pair of needle-nose pliers (the garage scene from Terminator 2 came to mind, heh) I snapped a couple pictures:









    The case pictured is from the bullet. I don't collect brass, and it was sitting on my desk (presumably placed there by my room mate). Think this might be something I hold onto... maybe get it put in an acrylic paperweight or something, as a visual reminder to what happened.
    Sent from the future using Squid Telepathy

    Quote Originally Posted by MistWolf View Post
    If we could control all the variables, we'd just put all the bad luck on our enemies and stay home.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    97
    Feedback Score
    0
    Damn man you are lucky and I wish you a speed recovery. I keep my HD gun in a nightstand safe with a round in the chamber...but I am OCD with making sure all the safety rules are followed.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,704
    Feedback Score
    0
    Thank you for sharing.

    Sad to say, I think nearly every serious gun owner has a moment that teaches them the importance safety. For me, it was almost shooting a college buddy right before graduation. I was explaining some FTF issues I was having with a new 1911. I dropped one in the chamber and let the slide slam home, and then realized it was pointed squarely at his chest. Thankfully, nothing happened. But I always remember.

    I'm still religious about clearing any weapon before I handle it. Drop mag, lock slide, inspect chamber and mag well for any loose rounds. Every now and then, though, I still find myself feeling complacent.
    "Man is still the first weapon of war" - Field Marshal Montgomery

    Owner and author at The Everyday Marksman Blog

  7. #67
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    720
    Feedback Score
    41 (100%)
    Thanks for sharing your experience. Hope you are recovering well.

Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •