Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21

Thread: Cerakote vs Nitride

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    9,639
    Feedback Score
    1 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by VIP3R 237 View Post
    Nitride is harder as it’s a chemical surface conversion, however cerakote is one of the best at corrosion resistance and you have the option of colors.

    Cerakote over Nitride is a great option, but you have to sandblast the surface in order for the cerakote to adhere.
    If your desire is to put a color over the surface treatment, wouldn't manganese phosphating (parkerizining) be a better solution?

    Generally I think most spray-on products state this in some form or another, this is from Norrell's Moly Resin:

    Moly Resin will adhere to all properly prepared metal surfaces including aluminum, stainless steel, titanium, copper, silver solder, and Parkerizing....the original Moly Resin coating was initially developed in 1980 for aluminum AR-15/M-16 receivers and stainless steel sound suppressors.

    Answer to a FAQ: Moly Resin is made to be applied directly to fresh clean blasted slightly textured metal, over Parkerizing or other surfaces that are not polished or slick.

    Use fine grit sized media to remove existing finish to get to fresh clean metal or place over degreased/cleaned Parkerizing. 40 psi for aluminum and 60-80 for steel.
    Patriotism means to stand by the country. It does not mean to stand by the President... - Theodore Roosevelt, Lincoln and Free Speech, Metropolitan Magazine, Volume 47, Number 6, May 1918.

    Every Communist must grasp the truth. Political power grows out of the barrel of a gun. Our principle is that the Party commands the gun, and the gun must never be allowed to command the Party Mao Zedong, 6 November, 1938 - speech to the Communist Patry of China's sixth Central Committee

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Northern UT
    Posts
    3,968
    Feedback Score
    66 (100%)
    Parkerizing is good for corrosion resistance but nitride also increases the surface hardness and reduces friction.

    Moly Resin is decent and many AK builders use it but I like how thin you lay down cerakote (1mil dft) and it’s better with corrosion resistance.


    Quote Originally Posted by 26 Inf View Post
    If your desire is to put a color over the surface treatment, wouldn't manganese phosphating (parkerizining) be a better solution?

    Generally I think most spray-on products state this in some form or another, this is from Norrell's Moly Resin:

    Moly Resin will adhere to all properly prepared metal surfaces including aluminum, stainless steel, titanium, copper, silver solder, and Parkerizing....the original Moly Resin coating was initially developed in 1980 for aluminum AR-15/M-16 receivers and stainless steel sound suppressors.

    Answer to a FAQ: Moly Resin is made to be applied directly to fresh clean blasted slightly textured metal, over Parkerizing or other surfaces that are not polished or slick.

    Use fine grit sized media to remove existing finish to get to fresh clean metal or place over degreased/cleaned Parkerizing. 40 psi for aluminum and 60-80 for steel.
    I paint spaceship parts.

    Quote Originally Posted by Failure2Stop View Post
    Stippled Glocks are like used underwear; previous owner makes all the difference in value.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,487
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)
    The salt tests for Cerkote are deceiving - if the paint is scratched through it will rust - its bare metal. Nitride penetrates the surface.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    445
    Feedback Score
    2 (100%)
    I had an engineer cringe when I told him that some people were reapplying Tennifer/melonite after mulling to parts that had already had it applied. He said to avoid that. I didn’t ask for a break down but it has made me skeptical of doing it.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Black Hills, South Dakota
    Posts
    2,927
    Feedback Score
    0
    Well then let's hope that the company Primary Machine is using for nitrocarburizing understands what needs to be done to re-nitride a part.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    723
    Feedback Score
    10 (100%)
    Comparing my cerakoted ATEI'd front serrated G19.3 with a stock G19.5 MOS, I prefer the gritty texture of the cerakoted slide much more.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,487
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)


    Had my once painted PreB redone in Nitride - like this better than Cerkote every day of the week, and it will wear better.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    7,706
    Feedback Score
    0
    I have just about all my weapons Duracoated (except handguns, go figure). My good friend is a Lauer-certified Duracoat applicator. I am not into camo patterns, just have them Duracoated to match the underlying color, i.e. "Colt Gray" for parkerized parts and matte black for anodized parts. That way if a scratch happens it won't show. I realize that Cerakote is a "tougher" product but my main goal is corrosion resistance, and Duracoat fits the bill nicely (and no shipping guns either, just drive over to my buddy's!).

    Whether it be Cerakote or Duracoat, to coat a slide after having it milled you will most likely remove the coating from the newly machined dovetail as you tap the sight into place, since it's obviously such a tight fit. If it was, in the case of some of the newer Glocks for instance, finished at the factory after the dovetail was milled there is obviously no issue. But since a dovetailed sight is such a tight fit I would guess either Cerakote or Duracoat would be scraped off installing the sight.
    11C2P '83-'87
    Airborne Infantry

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,916
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)
    No background with nitride except for what's on the new M&P pistols (Shield and Compact 4") I just acquired, so we'll see how that holds up.

    As for Cerakote: I live in one of the more humid areas of the US (PNW) and all my firearms except my Remington 700 rifle are either stainless, cerakoted, or both. Cerakote has a 100% track record for me on several firearms, so I can say it has done the job in VERY humid/wet shooting conditions. Most recently, the Cerakote on my C&S 1911 9mm Commander has been impressive and held up to a lot of use. There may be some detailed studies showing the technical differences between nitride and cerakote, might be worth searching for those. I have to assume S&W started using it on their M&P's for a good reason. Honestly, if you get a good Cerakote or Nitride job done by a reputable place, either one is probably going to do the job.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,487
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)
    The technical difference is simple: Nitride is a treatment of the steel that penetrates the surface, hardens it, and provides a good level of corrosion protection as well. Cerakote is paint - maybe the best, and if applied correctly, provides better corrosion protection than most if not all other paints. Perhaps better corrosion protection than Nitride.

    But nitride can get worn through and still provide protection. When ANY paint wears through, it is bare metal, and the metal will corrode as bare metal will.
    Last edited by m4brian; 06-08-19 at 21:36.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •