G&R Tactical
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 27 of 27

Thread: Moving to Canada - teach me about cold weather

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    2,388
    Feedback Score
    0
    I think you can still bring certain firearms into Canada- such as shotgun or a bolt action.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    150
    Feedback Score
    7 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Clint View Post
    Are you actually serious?

    What about summer 10 months out of the year?
    If serious, he will enjoy fall winter 5-6 months out of the year.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Republic of Texas near San Antonio
    Posts
    1,059
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by 7n6 View Post
    I think you can still bring certain firearms into Canada- such as shotgun or a bolt action.
    “The Three Legal Classes of Firearms in Canada:

    Non-Restricted: Non-restricted firearms are ordinary hunting and sporting rifles, shotguns and airguns with an overall length of 660mm or greater. Many airguns fall into this class because they are capable of achieving a muzzle velocity of 500 feet per second. If it is a centrefire semi-automatic firearm, the barrel length must be at least 470mm to be non-restricted. These firearms must be stored, transported and displayed according to Federal regulations and you need a firearms licence to possess them. Provincial and municipal rules may further regulate these firearms (e.g., Ontario hunting regulations require that firearms being transported be encased at night). Certain firearms, although they meet the above criteria, have been classified as "restricted" or "prohibited" by order-in-council.

    Restricted Handgun: Restricted firearms include many handguns and other firearms which do not meet the above specifications. Some firearms are classified as "restricted" by Federal order-in-council. All variants of the AR-15 genre of rifle are restricted firearms. A transport permit is required to transport a restricted firearm from the location where the firearm is registered. Anyone with the appropriate firearms licence and a valid purpose can acquire this type of firearm. Hunting with restricted firearms is not allowed in Canada.

    Prohibited Firearm: Prohibited firearms include all fully automatic firearms, converted automatics and a variety of other scary looking firearms which have been classified as "prohibited" by order-in-council. Most types of prohibited firearms are "grandfathered" to their current legal owners (i.e., owners are allowed to keep them), but cannot be transfered to non-grandfathered individuals. Firearms converted from full-automatic to semi-automatic, and many handguns (barrel lengths less than or equal to 105mm, .25 or .32 calibre) fall into the prohibited class. If you do not already own prohibited long guns, there is generally no legal means to acquire firearms of this type.”


    http://www.firearmstraining.ca/classes.htm

    I cannot say for sure this is 100% accurate but looks to be a valid Canadien firearms training source...

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,549
    Feedback Score
    1 (100%)

    Moving to Canada - teach me about cold weather

    Vancouver is wet and cool in winter, not a problem. Driving on mountain roads can be more dicey. You need to be ready for sudden heavy snowfall, be able to stay warm and functional if stopped for several hours in a storm, have chains, shovel to dig out, and proper snow clothes. Snow there (mtns) can often be heavy and wet, but also dry and light. 4wd is very handy.

    Oh yeah, be sure to have temp stable powders, and learn to love hockey, and say "eh" at the end of sentences.
    Last edited by NWPilgrim; 03-15-18 at 06:23.
    It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! ... Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!" - Patrick Henry in an address at St. Johnís Church, Richmond, Virginia, on March 23, 1775.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,178
    Feedback Score
    4 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Hmac View Post
    I lived there many years ago before moving down to lake country. I still spend a lot of time up there on The Range and along the North Shore. Several of us were staying in Tofte in February '96 when the temps hit minus 60 (no wind chill). We snowmobiled every day. Biggest problem was getting the machines started every morning.
    Ain't that the truth. It's the worst part of not having a garage where I am at. But, hey, I drove most of the year this year with just front wheel drive Rendezvous.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hmac View Post
    minus 20 to minus 30 isn't rare around here. Temps that cold aren't an "event"...they're a normal part of winter in Minnesota.

    -in the winter I drive a 3/4 ton GMC pickup 4x4 - stock all-season tires. I don't own any chains or other such traction devices and can't envision a need for me to have them around here. (Minnesota is non-mountainous). My wife drives a Murano, same thing. My summer car uses 275-35/19 low-profile summer tires. Five consecutive snowflakes and that car isn't driveable. It sits in the storage garage on a Battery Tender from late November to mid-March. I've been stuck a couple of times in my truck, usually driving it somewhere stupid. I called AAA. I carry a 25 foot tow strap but have only used it occasionally to pull other people out.

    -anti-freeze...whatever comes OEM in the car. My truck is 50-50 AF/water. That's about as low as antifreeze goes and is probably good to about -40. Colder than that around here is pretty rare.

    -I've had block heaters on trucks several years ago. Generally IIRC, it's about a $65 OEM option and most of the car dealers around here used to just order their cars with them automatically. I'm not sure if my current truck has one or not. I think the only time I've ever been glad I had one was a snowmobile trip "up north" in '96 where the temps hit -60. I plugged the vehicle in that time. No issues. My GMC has a steering wheel grip heater. IMHO, that's about 100X more useful than a block heater.

    -our car batteries are whatever comes from the mfgr. No issues. Any battery with 600+ cold-cranking amps is fine.

    The only concession I make to the cold in the way of vehicle preparation has generally been to switch to some kind of synthetic oil with the oil change some time in the fall. I did put a ceiling-mounted heater in the garage this year and keep it around 55 degrees. That's sweet. It makes driving to work in the morning much more pleasant.
    I have never used chains either, but I would be lying to say we didn't have some days I knew I shouldn't have been driving without them.

    As long as you give yourself room from the next cars and drive defensively, it's part of the life.

    I just hate running my car at idle to warm it up slightly, or just freezing since the car is giving off the cold. It's crazy when you park in a heated parking garage and come back 2 hours later and you can see your breath when you get in the car since the interior air leached that much cold from the car materials.

    Nonetheless, I really like Dry Cell batteries, but I haven't had any issues with car batteries over 600 cold cranking amps that wasn't related to age or cheap cina batteries.

    I have never needed a block heater, but when I worked for a rental fleet, we kept our diesels plugged in to make sure no gelling would occur and assure good starts. Otherwise, if it's -60, I work from home, I don't go anywhere unless it's absolutely required.

    I get concentrated coolant that's rated to have high ratios. I mix about 60/40 gives me about -55* if I recall correctly.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,240
    Feedback Score
    8 (100%)
    I'll give you $50 cash money for all your guns, since you wont be taking them with you!

    Cold, cold, and COLD.

    Have fun storming the castle! Maybe you and the PM can be friends????

    justin-trudeau-759-pti11.jpg
    Last edited by RHINOWSO; 03-15-18 at 10:53.
    - Rhino

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Republic of Texas near San Antonio
    Posts
    1,059
    Feedback Score
    0

    Moving to Canada - teach me about cold weather

    Regarding tire chains, I used them several time when I lived in Montana and Alaska. I always had a set in my full size 4*4 vehicles.

    Used them mainly when I was doing some back road/off road type recreation, but on a couple occasions, I chained up to get traction to pull folks out of ditches. There were also times they were required (in, not on the vehicle) if I wanted to go past the highway patrol checking at the bottom of mountain pass. Not sure if they still do that.

    If you slide off the road into a ditch, they can make the difference between calling a tow truck and getting yourself out. Cheap $40 insurance...


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by BuzzinSATX; 03-16-18 at 05:39.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •