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Thread: .357: ruger gp100 or Smith 686?

  1. #11
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    I have the lock on many revolvers. Where over 2000 rounds on most of them and I have never had to lock engage.

    As a comment/aside to the 1911 comment:
    I have had 2 Kimber 1911s. Both were unreliable. I have phoned Wilson, and Brown, gun crafter and colt without issues though.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  2. #12
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    It sounds almost like flip-a-coin between the two. I'll just see what's available and what the prices are.

  3. #13
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    I was in your shoes about 4 months ago. I bought the Ruger Match Champion. The stock trigger wasn't great but it wasn't bad. However, with a 10 lb hammer spring and 10 lb trigger return spring it rivals any of my friends' S&Ws and I don't have to worry about longer firing pins or using Federal primers. My vote would be Ruger.
    Quote Originally Posted by RichDC2 View Post
    That rifle has won trophies for its game face alone!

  4. #14
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    Rugers are built like a tank and those heavy lugs really tame recoil, but Smith's have better triggers.

    Ruger triggers can be made almost as smooth as a Smith if you consult the Iowegian's Book of Knowledge.

  5. #15
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    It depends on how many rounds you intend to shoot. L frames will shoot loose just like a K frame, it just takes longer. If your volume is going to be typical, it will do just fine. If you intend to shoot a lot of rounds you'd be better off with the GP100. As others have said they are built like tanks and have a much better cylinder locking system. Their triggers can be worked into a perfectly suitable action but the one thing it will never match a S&W on is lock time. Also you have the transfer bar that must be overcome to hit the firing pin hard enough. After shooting Smiths for so long I just couldn't get over how long it took for that hammer to hit. Note: I was shooting DA in USPSA matches. For bench work the Ruger will be fine. I ended up selling both of my GPs but they are good guns. Have you considered the N Frame?
    Last edited by shadowrider; 06-28-18 at 01:11.

  6. #16
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    I went ahead and got the Smith. $125 difference. I'm not going to be shooting a steady diet of red-line loads. Probably load up fairly mild most of the time.

  7. #17
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    Good choice. The Smith will hold up for as many years as you can hold a pistol. I can't remember the last time I shot full patch magnums in mine.

  8. #18
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    Thanks for all the suggestions and comments. I haven't fired it yet, but just handling it, it feels pretty awesome. If Dirty Harry'd had a girlfriend, she'd have carried the six-inch 686. This is going to be a range toy and reloading platform. I've been shooting for decades, but this is the first revolver I've actually gone out and purchased. It's in a different orbit than the plastic striker fired 9mm.


    Bullets and brass are on their way.

    So here's what I'm thinking:

    Lubrication on this should be much lighter than on a semi-auto, no? A drop of CLP goes a long way?

    I should fire a couple hundred jacketed bullets first, to smooth the bore, before getting into hard-cast lead?

  9. #19
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    I've never opened up my revolvers for lubrication. Not even ones from almost a 100 years ago. And some have definitely been worked hard. They're still working fine.

    Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk

  10. #20
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    Revolvers withstand neglect well but not abuse. I'll go 2000+ rounds between cleaning with my Colt government but I lightly clean and oil my revolvers after every shooting session. The side plate should not be opened unless one knows what one is doing. I use Balistol and Mobil 1 as my go to oils. Use clean burning powder as unburnt powder can build up between the forcing cone and front of the cylinder and bind up the action.

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