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Thread: what should i put in my bug-out-bag?

  1. #11
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    I was surprised to see canned foods mentioned. They are taboo and a serious no-go in the hiking world. Much too heavy for what they offer; there are many vacuum packed alternatives.
    Last edited by Leuthas; 07-22-18 at 12:55.
    Nobody ever got shot climbing over the wall into East Berlin.

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  2. #12
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    A tennis bag with an AR pistol and 8 loaded mags is all you need. You can shoot your way out of any trouble you find yourself in. You'll need an Aimpoint, Surefire.... wait what?




    What would you need for a night in a motel? Do you wear contacts? Need a spare set of eyeglasses? Medication? That's kind of where I start. The closest I ever got to "bugging out" was going through the Atlanta "snow-pocalypse" in 2014.

    I keep spare contacts, contact solution, spare glasses, basic pills (advil, benadryl, etc.), dental floss (ever had something stuck in your teeth for days camping without any?), protein bars and granola bars, cash in small bills, and my G19 with a spare mag or two.

    I really need to add some first aid stuff but need to educate myself more on that stuff.

    I rotate water bottles fairly regularly, and in the winter I add extra wool socks and jackets to the mix.

  3. #13
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    Just remember, weight is your enemy, even if a bag seems reasonable at home, a few miles in those extra pounds can really slow you down.

    Maps and a compass, GPS is nice but you need to keep extra batteries.
    I have a small solar panel that can attach to the outside of the bag to charge a battery pack or cell phone.

    Water filtration is a must, to keep weight down you can use tablets or go with a small filter. If you're going to boil water to kill bacteria a metal cup and portable stove will work.
    Fire stating devices as well as something to help keep a fire going. Lint from a dryer works well.


    A poncho, this can double as a shelter.
    Extra clothing especially socks, wet feet and long hikes lead to major problems.



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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by grizzlyblake View Post
    dental floss (ever had something stuck in your teeth for days camping without any?)
    Fishing line makes great dental floss as does the finer inner threads of para cord.

    All my SAKs (Swiss Army Knife) have a plastic tooth pick in the end.
    "In a nut shell, if it ever goes to Civil War, I'm afraid I'll be in the middle 70%, shooting at both sides" — 26 Inf


    "We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men, most of them radicalized to the right, and we have to start doing something about them." — CNN's Don Lemon 10/30/18

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by derekhann View Post
    I've working on practicing my survival skills and am currently in the progress of making a bug-out-bag (B.O.B.) for stuff like natural disasters like a pandemic, earthquake, hurricane, etc. I put the regular stuff in it like a first aid kit, and canned food, radio, stuff like that but I don't really know what else to put in it and I'm asking for your help thanks! also note that I live on the coast, should I have stuff specifically for that?
    There may be a few threads on that topic here somewhere....
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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leuthas View Post
    I was surprised to see canned foods mentioned. They are taboo and a serious no-go in the hiking world. Much too heavy for what they offer; there are many vacuum packed alternatives.
    Dehydrated foods packaged for backpackers are great but . . .

    They require water AND a fire to boil that water in order to reconstitute them. I can think of a few scenarios where one might be bugging out and not have the luxury of time, extra water, and or it would not be advantageous to alert others to their location by having a fire and all that entails. There is no free lunch when it comes to weight in a pack one is bearing on their person. However canned foods do not require extra water and fire to prepare. They are highly portable and are ideal for eating on the go, they store long, they are resistant to spoilage, etc.
    "In a nut shell, if it ever goes to Civil War, I'm afraid I'll be in the middle 70%, shooting at both sides" — 26 Inf


    "We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men, most of them radicalized to the right, and we have to start doing something about them." — CNN's Don Lemon 10/30/18

  7. #17
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    Yeah I don't keep hardly any kind of dehydrated foods around for emergencies. In every emergency event I've been a part of water is so scarce that you do not want to expend any on reconstituting food.

    Traveling: Beef jerky, granola bars, protein bars, sugary candies
    At home: Canned goods, peanut butter, and the travel type stuff

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moose-Knuckle View Post
    Dehydrated foods packaged for backpackers are great but . . .

    They require water AND a fire to boil that water in order to reconstitute them. I can think of a few scenarios where one might be bugging out and not have the luxury of time, extra water, and or it would not be advantageous to alert others to their location by having a fire and all that entails. There is no free lunch when it comes to weight in a pack one is bearing on their person. However canned foods do not require extra water and fire to prepare. They are highly portable and are ideal for eating on the go, they store long, they are resistant to spoilage, etc.
    Look up “no-cook backpacking food”. Backpacking, especially long distances like through-hikers do when hiking the Appalachian Trail or PCT, requires a pretty high caloric intake for consistently high levels of activity. Canned food is probably the best option for at home, but on the go, such as required for “bugging out”, there are better options. Peanut butter, Nutella, crackers, foil packaged tuna in oil, the list goes on. The key is rotating it out regularly so it doesn’t spoil, and securing it against rodents. The easiest way I’ve found to do this is to pack stuff that you would eat regularly or semi-regularly, and keep it stored in a metal ammo can. 24-72hr worth of food can fit in normal .30 or .50 cal sized cans next to/on top of/or even inside a “bug out bag”.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moose-Knuckle View Post
    Duct tape, well that and the $10K.


    You would be amazed at the number of imbeciles that don't even own one roll of duct tape. This is my preferred size and brand for a go bag, Gorilla Duct Tape To-Go seconded by Duck Brand Ducklings Mini Duct Tape Rolls.



    ETA: OP, there are a metric poopoo ton of "bug-out-bag contents" threads on this particular sub-forum and the Fieldcraft & Survival technical sub-forum.
    I bought gorilla EVERYTHING, that line of products is amazing. And don't forget superglue for closing cuts, forget stitches. And I'm serious. Read up.

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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffM. View Post
    Look up “no-cook backpacking food”. Backpacking, especially long distances like through-hikers do when hiking the Appalachian Trail or PCT, requires a pretty high caloric intake for consistently high levels of activity. Canned food is probably the best option for at home, but on the go, such as required for “bugging out”, there are better options. Peanut butter, Nutella, crackers, foil packaged tuna in oil, the list goes on. The key is rotating it out regularly so it doesn’t spoil, and securing it against rodents. The easiest way I’ve found to do this is to pack stuff that you would eat regularly or semi-regularly, and keep it stored in a metal ammo can. 24-72hr worth of food can fit in normal .30 or .50 cal sized cans next to/on top of/or even inside a “bug out bag”.
    Oh I have my fair share of dehydrated backpacking stuffs; Wise, Backpacker Pantry, Mountain House, etc. Also MRE's, canned foods, etc. The name of the game is variety so long as it is shelf stable. In fact in my BOB currently I have Mountain House Pro-Paks, the small profile pouches specifically made for backpacking.

    I'll look up the no-cook meals and add them to the stores.




    Quote Originally Posted by Pappabear View Post
    I bought gorilla EVERYTHING, that line of products is amazing. And don't forget superglue for closing cuts, forget stitches. And I'm serious. Read up.

    PB
    T-Rex offers up some legit products as well.

    http://www.trextape.com/
    Last edited by Moose-Knuckle; 07-25-18 at 16:04.
    "In a nut shell, if it ever goes to Civil War, I'm afraid I'll be in the middle 70%, shooting at both sides" — 26 Inf


    "We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men, most of them radicalized to the right, and we have to start doing something about them." — CNN's Don Lemon 10/30/18

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