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Thread: what should i put in my bug-out-bag?

  1. #21
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    In all my vehicles, I have a Get Home Bag and can also be a Bug Out Bag. I live in the out skirts of Los Angeles and work in LA, so my equipment is more geared for the city. What I have in all bags:
    All this equipment in bold is in Maxpedition Beefy Pocket Organizer
    1. fire starter, either a lighter or fire rod.
    2. sawyer water filter
    3. Jones Stephens 4-Way Valve Stem Lawn Faucet Key
    4. a ZT or Spyderco 4 inch bladed knife
    5. 12 feet of duct tape
    6. compass and map of LA
    7. Olight flash light with 3 pairs of CR 123 batteries
    8. bandanna and Shemagh (In the
    9. medical kit with trauma shears in a Maxpedition First Response Pouch
    10. 6 cliff bars and SPAM packs (YUCK!!) in a Cannae Utility pouch
    11. 25 feet of Paracord
    12. 2 spare magazines for a Glock 17 and SIG P320
    13. pair of boxer briefs and pairs of sock
    14. 40 ounch water container
    15. Multi-tool
    16. hand crank radio

    And all this is in a Cannae Legion elite.

    extra in the car i have
    1. 55" X 90" pouncho
    2 .extra pair of pants and shorts for my and the wife
    3. hiking shoes for both
    4. 2 pairs of underwear and socks for both

    may sound a lot but it fits in the packs and is right at 27 pounds. now if I would to move to more in the country or just to travel, my equipment will change.
    Last edited by El_Chingon; 07-27-18 at 10:57.

  2. #22
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    I pretty much follow the 6 C's, and tailor the extras to the need.

    Cutting Tool: A folder or multitool is a good second, but I would prefer a good 4-5" fixed blade which can be used for a lot of tasks and doesn't take up much room. I use a Becker BK-16, but there are a lot of other good ones out there.

    Cover: This means shelter. A poncho or small tarp will do. I have a .mil poncho from Old Grouch, but BCO makes some very nice ones as well

    Cordage: I keep 50' of paracord, which can be used for setting up shelter or other tasks. I also have a penchant for #36 Tarred Bank Line, which is lighter, doesn't stretch, takes up less space for length, and is nearly as strong (320 lb break strength).

    Container: A metal container for carrying water, boiling, cooking, whatever. Single walled. I use a Vargo BOT and/or a metal USGI canteen/cup/stove combo

    Combustion: A way to make fire. Preferably several ways. I keep a ferro rod and Zippo with butane insert.

    Communications: Signal mirror, radio, whistle, VS-17 panel, take your pick
    "Man is still the first weapon of war" - Field Marshal Montgomery

    The Everyday Marksman

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by El_Chingon View Post
    In all my vehicles, I have a Get Home Bag and can also be a Bug Out Bag. I live in the out skirts of Los Angeles and work in LA, so my equipment is more geared for the city. What I have in all bags:
    All this equipment in bold is in Maxpedition Beefy Pocket Organizer
    1. fire starter, either a lighter or fire rod.
    2. sawyer water filter
    3. Jones Stephens 4-Way Valve Stem Lawn Faucet Key
    4. a ZT or Spyderco 4 inch bladed knife
    5. 12 feet of duct tape
    6. compass and map of LA
    7. Olight flash light with 3 pairs of CR 123 batteries
    8. bandanna and Shemagh (In the
    9. medical kit with trauma shears in a Maxpedition First Response Pouch
    10. 6 cliff bars and SPAM packs (YUCK!!) in a Cannae Utility pouch
    11. 25 feet of Paracord
    12. 2 spare magazines for a Glock 17 and SIG P320
    13. pair of boxer briefs and pairs of sock
    14. 40 ounch water container
    15. Multi-tool
    16. hand crank radio

    And all this is in a Cannae Legion elite.

    extra in the car i have
    1. 55" X 90" pouncho
    2 .extra pair of pants and shorts for my and the wife
    3. hiking shoes for both
    4. 2 pairs of underwear and socks for both

    may sound a lot but it fits in the packs and is right at 27 pounds. now if I would to move to more in the country or just to travel, my equipment will change.
    I took my pack on a 4.4 mile hike, and damn, I am out of shape. i need to start walking with my pack again...and to remove some items. has anyone gone for a little hike with your gear?

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by El_Chingon View Post
    I took my pack on a 4.4 mile hike, and damn, I am out of shape. i need to start walking with my pack again...and to remove some items. has anyone gone for a little hike with your gear?
    What does your gear weigh? I shoot for no more than 30lbs. I should hike with it more no doubt.
    - Will

    General Performance/Fitness Advice for all

    www.BrinkZone.com

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    “Those who do not view armed self defense as a basic human right, ignore the mass graves of those who died on their knees at the hands of tyrants.”

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillBrink View Post
    What does your gear weigh? I shoot for no more than 30lbs. I should hike with it more no doubt.
    my pack weighs ~28 lbs. without water. 31 lbs with water. I haven't worked out as much for 4 months do to injuries, but I am planning to go on a 5 mile walks with my pack every other day with hills included to get back in shape. can't believe how fast you can get out of shape do to an injury or just busy with life preventing you from working out.

  6. #26
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    Ear plugs.

    In 2004 I evacuated hurricane impact zones three times in Florida, usually going at least 400 miles to find available hotel rooms. In every single instance, the ear plugs I had in my first aid kit were of tremendous value as no matter how far away you are from the disaster area, motels/hotels are full of fighting adults, screaming children, and barking dogs that are upset to be away from home and often intoxicated.

    Ear plugs.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by hatidua View Post
    Ear plugs.

    In 2004 I evacuated hurricane impact zones three times in Florida, usually going at least 400 miles to find available hotel rooms. In every single instance, the ear plugs I had in my first aid kit were of tremendous value as no matter how far away you are from the disaster area, motels/hotels are full of fighting adults, screaming children, and barking dogs that are upset to be away from home and often intoxicated.

    Ear plugs.
    that is interesting, and thank you for you input. something I have been missing and will add to my BOB/GHB

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Defaultmp3 View Post
    Toilet paper and/or baby wipes.
    +1 for this post.....and tweezers.
    Good night Chesty...wherever you are.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffM. View Post
    The scenarios you listed are fairly localized and relatively short term regarding pure survival. Katrina is the big one that we can look at in the US. A little water, food, and clothing appropriate for the weather will keep you alive. Beyond that, items that would help you A. leave the area, 2. secure shelter once a safe location is found, and D. continue living a somewhat normal life while displaced and/or facilitate returning home to do the same. A reliable vehicle, a good pair of boots & socks, and a good multitool are a good start for “bugging out”, past that, cash is king. $10k might be a bit much, but isn’t far off the mark. You should think about having enough for 1st/last/deposit on a place you could stand living in for a few months, a set of clothes appropriate for job interviews, fuel/bus pass and groceries for a month, and a bit extra for other incidentals. Copies (or originals/certified copies) of important documents that would be necessary to gain housing and employment like Social Security card/Passport/ID card, insurance policies for ease of starting the claims process for recovery/rebuilding/relocating expenses, etc. Those are solid items for any realistic bug-out scenario.
    Clothes for job interviews? Are you talking about bugging out or moving?

    Canned foods are a terrible idea if you’re on foot. Buy some MREs, they don’t have a crazy long shelf life but they’re perfect for what they were made for. And building a bag without a plan is just wasting money. Come up with some reasonable scenarios, pick some locations that you’d actually move to if able, and they figure out what you’d need to get there. And if your location is 10 miles always but you can’t walk more than two miles without a break, nothing you can buy is going to mean shit.


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    Sic semper tyrannis.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wake27 View Post
    Clothes for job interviews? Are you talking about bugging out or moving?

    Canned foods are a terrible idea if you’re on foot. Buy some MREs, they don’t have a crazy long shelf life but they’re perfect for what they were made for. And building a bag without a plan is just wasting money. Come up with some reasonable scenarios, pick some locations that you’d actually move to if able, and they figure out what you’d need to get there. And if your location is 10 miles always but you can’t walk more than two miles without a break, nothing you can buy is going to mean shit.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I guess it depends on your perspective and what sort of "bug-out" scenario you're preparing for. Jeff's list is probably spot on for someone who has had their home destroyed by a hurricane, wildfire, etc.

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