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Thread: What is the Best Magazine for Shooting Prone?

  1. #31
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    Amen
    Quote Originally Posted by jackblack73 View Post
    Does it really matter how it shoots when prone? If I could suddenly buy standard capacity mags Iíd buy a bunch of 20s and 30s regardless.
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  2. #32
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    Had a bipod and 20rd NHMTGs until an instructor suggested I try one of my PMag 30s and no bipod, and did just as well as before. Ditched the bipod and lightened the rifle, and gained ten rounds in the process.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MistWolf View Post
    If we could control all the variables, we'd just put all the bad luck on our enemies and stay home.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dionysusigma View Post
    Had a bipod and 20rd NHMTGs until an instructor suggested I try one of my PMag 30s and no bipod, and did just as well as before. Ditched the bipod and lightened the rifle, and gained ten rounds in the process.
    This is exactly what I am thinking now. Even in California a 10/30 mag is legal (30 round sized blocked to only accept ten rounds). No other support would be necessary.

  4. #34
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    I like the 20 rd pmags

  5. #35
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    I know that using the magazine is a common way to get support but Iíve found I get better follow up times when shooting as low to the ground as possible with my elbows spread wide. This position doesnít let me use a 30rd magazine, and I have the wing span of an ostrich (honestly).

    It should come as no surprise, either. Having a wider, lower shooting position is going to be inherently more stable than one propped up higher (even with that third contact point) . Id be curious to see comparisons first round time on target scores as well as split times for a bunch of people using both methods. If there was a concensus it would allow us to answer threads like these with some knowledge instead of arguing with each other.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eurodriver View Post
    I know that using the magazine is a common way to get support but I’ve found I get better follow up times when shooting as low to the ground as possible with my elbows spread wide. This position doesn’t let me use a 30rd magazine, and I have the wing span of an ostrich (honestly).

    It should come as no surprise, either. Having a wider, lower shooting position is going to be inherently more stable than one propped up higher (even with that third contact point) . Id be curious to see comparisons first round time on target scores as well as split times for a bunch of people using both methods. If there was a concensus it would allow us to answer threads like these with some knowledge instead of arguing with each other.
    There is considerable differences of opinion on the bast prone position. Some like the "leg hiked up" position because it allows the shooter to breath without seriously affecting the sight picture. Some like a lower position with legs straight back and ankles of the ground because it is more stable (lower center of gravity and wider base). The majority of people, however believe that ones support arm should be as close being directly under the weapon forearm as possible to achieve the best and most stable support. Also, if one is shooting a cal .30 rifle and they don't get their support arm tucked in tight, they most often have their support arm elbow slip outboard in rapid fire and their shots will string toward the support side. I personally like to also put my shooting arm in fairly close to my body in order to ensure that I pull the trigger directly rearward. As one's wrist bends, it becomes more difficult to ensure a rearward trigger pull. Just my two cents worth.

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