Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23

Thread: Noob owner seeks guidance re: making my Colt range-ready.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    56
    Feedback Score
    1 (100%)
    Personally when I get a new AR I just wipe down the chamber and BCG with a microfiber clothe and then apply oil to BCG and Chamber. I like metal on metal to be separated by oil, probably just something I do from mechanic/car work. I donít like metal on metal moving parts. Personally donít clean the barrel on a new rifle, it canít hurt though.

    Usually ARís seem to come with this new factory oil on everything. I donít know what it is but it smells the same even when I buy ARís from different manufactures. I guess its some anti corrosion/rust type lubricant.

    Ultimately itíd be fine right out of the box.

    As some others have suggested iíd pop open that Colt owners manual and take some time to read their directions on cleaning the rifle. Some manuals suggest breaking down entire BCG for cleaning but I find this to be a bit much for moderate range use, hell, what do I know though. I think thorough cleaning is best done at higher round counts, 500, 1000, etc, I donít know though

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    20
    Feedback Score
    0
    I run a patch down barrel. Lube Bcg and shoot it like ya stole it.

    I did have an uncle touch off a brand new Weatherby 30-378 wrath mag. The barrel had sumthn in it. Turned it into a blossomed barrel.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    317
    Feedback Score
    0
    I overclean new guns, but that's just me. I view the oily substance as more of a preservative than a lubricant, though I'm sure it works well enough for a maiden range trip. I run a patch with a couple drops of whatever (Hoppe's/CLP/Ballistol) down the bore then follow with a dry patch. I make sure that factory oil is wiped clean off the inside of the receiver, hammer, and BCG. I even pop the extractor pin out and clean under there.

    Like I said, overkill, but it can't hurt. Your Colt will likely work if you don't clean it at all before the first trip, but why treat it like that?

    Oh, and definitely don't do anything to the gas tube.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    118
    Feedback Score
    0
    Shoot the bloody thing and don't worry. Firearms are not at all complex, shooting and maintaining them is easy.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,154
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)
    To clean AR, new in box or 20 years old:

    1. Scrub well with Hoppes and a GI toothbrush. Patch out the bore. Clean the chamber with a pistol rod and a .38 caliber brush and patch.

    2. Blast with non chlorinated brake cleaner. $2.50 a can at auto parts stores. Wear a glove on your left hand, and eye protection.

    3. Blast dry with compressed air.

    4. Lube the locking lugs, cam pin, bolt body, and piston rings generously with Breakfree LP. Lube the firing pin and everything else lightly with Breakfree CLP.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    260
    Feedback Score
    26 (100%)
    Quote Originally Posted by MWAG19919 View Post
    I overclean new guns, but that's just me. I view the oily substance as more of a preservative than a lubricant, though I'm sure it works well enough for a maiden range trip. I run a patch with a couple drops of whatever (Hoppe's/CLP/Ballistol) down the bore then follow with a dry patch. I make sure that factory oil is wiped clean off the inside of the receiver, hammer, and BCG. I even pop the extractor pin out and clean under there.

    Like I said, overkill, but it can't hurt. Your Colt will likely work if you don't clean it at all before the first trip, but why treat it like that?

    Oh, and definitely don't do anything to the gas tube.
    This is me too. I like to break the gun down all the way and clean everything with Hoppes No. 9., I don't like brake free. BCG, bore, chamber, barrel, both receivers, and even the buffer spring assembly, then re-apply my chosen lube or oil very thinly in the receivers, a drop on the safety and trigger, very thin coat in the barrel, and a slather on the BCG. None down the gas tube. One of the added benefits is cleaning and oiling it thoroughly like that also give me a chance to inspect every component for serviceability.

    I normally run clean weapons anyways, but even if I didn't I wouldn't want to grind the factory grease into all the nooks and crannies of my new rifle, so I take the time before hand to really clean it up nice. That said, I've run a brand new Colt before cleaning it in the past, and it did just fine. I've also run about 250 rounds through a completely dry BCM before realizing I forgot to oil the BCG, and it too did just fine with no failures of any kind. so others aren't wrong to advise just shoot it, it depends on how you like to treat and run your guns.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    351
    Feedback Score
    0
    Many thanks again for your helpful replies, Gentlemen. I very much appreciate your time and the great suggestions.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Posts
    4,200
    Feedback Score
    49 (100%)
    Jerry Miculek on breaking down and cleaning an AR15:


  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Posts
    4,200
    Feedback Score
    49 (100%)
    A little bit from Tu Lam on setting up sling/stock:


  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Posts
    4,200
    Feedback Score
    49 (100%)
    Garand Thumb on carbine setup:


Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •