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Thread: Tips for a wet tumbler and SS media?

  1. #11
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    I ran a load of brass with half the pins. Couldn’t tell the difference in the brass but probably knocked 5-8 minutes off the separation/clean up time. I didn’t notice a difference in the primer pockets but I haven’t loaded them yet.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by markm View Post
    Hard water vs. Soft water. Phoenix area has really hard water. 19 grains hard at my house. (zero being soft water) So I ran a batch of brass with hard water, and a batch with soft. The hard water brass looked a little shinier. Almost like the soft water smoothed out the pin tumbling action too much. The hard water was a little harsher on the pin action, and made the brass cleaner.
    Yet another reason to continue to not put salt in my water softener

  3. #13
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    I stopped using the pins for my wet tumbling altogether (pistol and rifle brass). I got tired of having to inspect rifle cases either manually or with a magnet for the pins that would get stuck/left behind. I was using the Frankford rotary media separator too.

    I now use automotive car wash and wax soap along with lemishine. Like others, I also have hard water and if I allow my brass to air dry, water spots will get left behind. I use the Frankford brass dryer and I am satisfied with the results.


    My process now is as follows:
    1. De-prime brass, remove primer pocket crimps, and load into F.A.R.T.
    2. Run the F.A.R.T with car was soap and lemishine
    3. Drain water and brass into the rotary media separator to remove as much water as possible
    4. Load clean brass into brass dryer

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TxRaptor View Post
    I stopped using the pins for my wet tumbling altogether (pistol and rifle brass). I got tired of having to inspect rifle cases either manually or with a magnet for the pins that would get stuck/left behind. I was using the Frankford rotary media separator too.
    I grab 5 or 6 pieces of brass at a time and tap the pins out on the sifter, then drop them into rinse water. It's a pain for .223 because there's more brass and they're smaller. .308 and up isn't too bad.
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

  5. #15
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    I pick up ranhe brass after 3gun matches and there is a lot of dirt and debris, so I have to use the pins to clean out the dirt and such.

    How shiny are you getting your brass? I realize it doesn’t make much difference, but when I was using a Harbor Freight double drum tumbler the brass was much brighter than I get it with the FART...

  6. #16
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    I've noticed that brass fired through a gas gun with a suppressor doesn't come out very shiny. I'm running 3 hour cycles on average.
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

  7. #17
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    I too am using range brass. However the brass has not been on the ground/dirt for very long.

    I run mine for about an hour to an hour and a half and the brass comes out shiny enough for me. It does not look like brand new brass but pretty darn close. There is a company that sells a product called "Brass juice". They claim their brass cleaning product does not require the use of pins and that your brass comes out looking new. Once I use up my current car wash/wax solution, I may give it a try.

  8. #18
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    The shiniest stuff I've ever seen is from that brutal dry media with Jewlers' Rouge. That stuff is nasty, and stick inside the casings. I think sinister (here) thought it had damaged a barrel, and I believe it.
    "You people have too much time on your hands." - scottryan

  9. #19
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    With the FART, I also stopped using the pins and noticed that normal range brass comes out clean. Must be all the agitation from the bigger tumbler as I started out on a harbor freight model.
    Also, don't use to much Lemishine or within about six weeks or so your brass will tarnish.

  10. #20
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    The shiniest stuff I ever made was wet tumbled with SS media a touch of Dawn and lemishine. Rinsed then put into very hot water with a touch of lemishine in it. From there they went into a strainer were I tossed them until most of the water ran out, then dumped onto a towel and tossed around until dry. Not only were they ridiculously shiny, they stayed that way.

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