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Thread: Muzzle dip

  1. #11
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    I find it is better to film.observe from the other side when looking at grip. Do you by chance have any video from the other side?

    I attended a class by Rob Vogel, World Class Pistol Skills and decided to begin using his grip and working out with grippers as he advocated.

    First, let me caution you not to go too hot and heavy on grip exercises, I developed tendonitis and had to quit for a while, then resume much lower.

    I was already doing some of what he advocates, but one thing that made a huge difference was thinking about the difference between what he calls 'monkey grip' and a pinch grip.

    This is a good video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45QhpvY9LZc

    I think Vogel is a good teacher. Like most instructors running a one-man show I felt his class size was too large, but he made a concerted effort to give individual attention to each shooter.
    "If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said a faster horse." - Henry Ford

    “You are responsible for your actions, but the world doesn’t turn around you, so it’s important that you find something bigger than yourself to work for, a way for you to make a difference.” - Drew Dix, MOH VN '68

  2. #12
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    Ok- Proctor’s advice about pinching at the back is good- never did that (or know to go foreward or back), so Ill experiment.

    Vogels grip is noticably better, but inconsisntency(maybe above issue) caused intermittent failure to lock back.
    Also working on focusing on locking wrist (ring and pinky fingers tight) and general grip strength. Also noticed im not rotating elbows out (used to, dont know why I stopped?) Thanks a lot, guys.
    Last edited by MegademiC; 09-25-18 at 19:54.

  3. #13
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    Alright, new video from the left side(camera look up slightly).
    Went for “big” grip, especially with support hand, and rolled elbows out/top of hands squeezing in.
    Forgot to “lock” ring and small fingers, but I still think its an improvement. Agree or is there still a lot of room for improvement?

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/i3iiqevhd2...20PM.mov?raw=1
    Last edited by MegademiC; 10-01-18 at 07:10.

  4. #14
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    I’m still seeing a lot of bounce. The round is fired and the gun recoils then it dips low then back above the line and back on target. Admittedly video replay is new for me but all that movement seems like a lot.
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  5. #15
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    Well, there’s always room for improvement, for all of us.

    The gun appears more stable and looks to return to the same, neutral point after slide cycles.
    Proof’s in the pudding; were your hits better?
    Try the ring/little finger pinch as well.
    Your form looks better.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaijin View Post
    Well, there’s always room for improvement, for all of us.

    The gun appears more stable and looks to return to the same, neutral point after slide cycles.
    Proof’s in the pudding; were your hits better?
    Try the ring/little finger pinch as well.
    Your form looks better.
    Not a direct comparison as this was more like .3-.4 splits at 25yds, but I didnt see the dip I was seeing before (watching the dot)
    I feel like Im heading in the right direction now.
    Last edited by MegademiC; 10-01-18 at 07:11.

  7. #17
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    FWIW; I've shot pistols/"Three Gun" for 35 years, was ranked "High Master" in Action Pistol/Bianchi Cup and "Master" USPSA- in the pre "Grand Master" days.
    Although it has been years since I've formally shot competitively, I shoot regularly and do one on one tutorials- selectively. I am still a competent shooter.

    The point? I STILL need to mentally rehearse the basics I tend to be weak in- before I shoot; "BIG" grip (control the gun), sight picture, trigger control, watch the effing reload IN the gun, etc...

    The art of shooting is more a journey than a destination.
    We all have goals we'd like to achieve; surviving a gunfight, placing first in a sectional, being a competent 1K yd. shooter- whatever. Goals are great motivators.
    For me, this about steady improvement. I have yet to see anyone attain perfection.

    Find a mentor/sensei. Perfect practice makes perfect.

    Keep working, enjoy the journey.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaijin View Post
    The art of shooting is more a journey than a destination.
    Very true; and if it's a destination, you don't get to stay there for free if you get there. I've found shooting to be very much like any other sport (like weight training), where you might obtain a certain level of proficiency (or strength) at a certain point in time, but need to work to maintain it.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by militarymoron View Post
    Very true; and if it's a destination, you don't get to stay there for free if you get there. I've found shooting to be very much like any other sport (like weight training), where you might obtain a certain level of proficiency (or strength) at a certain point in time, but need to work to maintain it.
    Most certainly. Shooting, to ones full potential, is a perishable skill.
    Last edited by gaijin; 09-29-18 at 16:51.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaijin View Post
    Most certainly. Shooting, to ones full potential, is a perishable skill.
    ...and your full potential can always become your sub-par performance.

    Im not looking to get complacent, I focus on whatever my weak point is, and Ive IDed grip as a current one.

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